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Hutchinson News: Thursday, April 10, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - April 10, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                HUTCHINSON DAILY NEWS: THfBSDAY MOHNIN&, APBftL 10, lb90. BABY'S GREETING. My mamma a&yu this to your blrlbdaT, Anil tclbt mn to wf*h papa, dear. Just nil the good thjog* 1 can Uilnk of, To bleaa him through ell tbo long year, I Uilak you're, the very best papa That crffr & little boy/ had. And wber. 1 get biff I'll be Hko yon. And nrv� ttoihingn that are brul. fto papa, dear, please klwt my dimpled, And hear while 1 whisper to you The loving-wt wUh to your birthday 1 find In my baby hekrt. tnn>. Yoti we ovary nlnKt ere t (dumber. When tired of frolic and play, I fold my small bandit hi my mamma's, And look In her brown eyes and pray: "May God talto roiaI caro cf my |tapa"- And thon inamtiia kfsscw my cheeks; Her Hps part and softly she nrnnuunr. "Qod, hear what the baby voles i-prakal" And so I now pray to the angels To guard you wherever you main, And brfuic back my darling yountf P�pa To baby and mamma and home- 1 hope that each year we'ro together May tench w new lessorm of joy-That I may grow old with my paim. And you may grow young with your boy. -Chicago H'Tald, FKIEDKL Clone by tho edge o' the bealh, whfTf' tue little rivulet which rose in the neighboring forest began to widen its ImkI, wo* situated a mill, called the field mill. Day and ntgbt Urn wheel rovolved as If it would never stop, and Its monotonous clatter increased the fooling of solitude. If the lovely boy playing quietly before tho door of tho dwelling house had not attracted the attention of the visitor, one could well have believed the field mill was served by an invisible l>eing. The miller canto out of tho house, and, stooping over the lw->y, passed his hand through his flnxen ringlets. "Now, Friedel," ho said, "where is your mother I" The oh lid, scarcely 4 yearn old, raleod his laugh in;? eyes to his father and cried: "Why, there, there I in tho garden." And with that ho pointed otf across tho yard, which was bordered with stables. "Hun and get her; I wish to speak with her," wtid tho miller, and taking the hoy up ho pressed a* kiss on his brow and then let him spring away. The miller Gerard, with an old servuut, At-tended to the mill, which he inherited from his father. For yean; 11 faithful wife had �bared his Joys and sorrows with him; for not always had thoy Been good times. When bad harvests occurred, or a hnil storm destroyed tbe fields of the industrious peasants, there was but little work and small profit. Then for many days the Held mill stood still, and tho miller went through his'possesslous with care ladened heart. In ono such hard time God gave them a son, who, at his baptism, received the name of Gottfried. With him happiness und contentment came back to the field mill. And as tho miller was a true hearted, honorable man, his customers remained loyally with him, and after tho hard times, as before, brought lheir grain to the mill. As sunshine followed rain, so good times followed bud. Friedel grow visibly. Ah amusing boy, ho sweetened many h mrs for bis parent*;. He also koow how to appear well witli ohl Nero, tho watchdog, lit* never tcaKed any animal, and ho was very sorry when tho cat played a long timo with a mouse or rat l>et'ore she killed her prey-which was her nature, you know. Tho bright flowers in tho garden were his dearest companion*; from them ho wound nosegays und wreaths with which he ornamented tho windows and pictures. Thus tho little son entered his sixth year, and tho timo drew near when they must take him to school. Friedel rejoiced greatly at that, for, from the talk of his good mother, school must IV) a wonderland in which one saw and learned a thousand new things. The way thither was long; tho village with which tho field mill In-longed Lay a league--an hour's \imo-distant, and although Friedel had lieon over tho road u few times, tho land und people of his native surroundings were quite strauge to him. i Now tho great day was come. The wagon stood ready beforu tlm door, mid within, hi tho little room, they drew on thy boy's overcoat; for just at Ilrnt, winter ugain bade farewell to humanity, whirled about yet jnauy times, and shrieked with anger because it must go at last. j "Come, come! tha horses never stand," called the father to the loiterer. Out. of tho door stepped the mother and her little -on and got into tho wagon. Tho father took 11U place upon tho front seat and away thoy wont, in the eurly morning. That was a day full of events. First Friedel was led, with mauy other children, into a great room in which a crowd of people sat. Then ft gentlmnau, dressed in dark clothes, with a long, 11 owing robu and a wldto run", had come in, had grouted every child in a very friendly manner, and had spoken much of the dear God and their parents; also saying that tho place where the htUo children would now coiih) in daily was a very sacred pUco, uhuroouo was really ivMisiblo of tho omnipresence of God; therefore they must, by great industry and cunstunt attention, always cause God nnd their teacher to n-joieo. But tho greatest pleasure had arisen when another worthy gentleman hud, all at ouoe, brought iu a great basket which was heaped full of paper corn eta of sugar, and tho largest-yes, the largest-had come to Friedel. Truly that was n delightful place- the school I The good impression which tho school mads on Friedel that first day was never effaced. Tho uaUler'e child - was the darling of the teacher and tho pupils.  In grasping and re-taiutng Ideas, Friedel wan tho best scholar. iAnd bo would, moreover, always have caught 7: tho bust ideas in all .branches of study, bad not on inaliuatioa to Inattention hi-hit own Vrojgs&Qon to him undoubtedly unlawful. ^SflffiBW%>tfity>*Mthe old village chorister >id to Friedol'H father, "that tho iTM,T|SS�aoh levity." _ JtWitf bfld done no good, and, iuoiv-^j^/thO k^her and bis parents were not Uy to,that. njjlfcwtll ubsddo even yet," the miller of ten . tfi$L\ 'Vnousness comes with years." Q * "Hlpil wax not the coso with Krlcdel. The t^-older ho gTew, the gayer aud more wanton bo appeared. lie sang and leape^l about all tlie day, wrestled with \\U coinrodta�t school climbed tho highest trees, waded through / swamps und brookii where thoy were tho (le&pest, and bad rash plana of a thousand kinds Mi Jils head, Nevvrt-helete, ho was a good feolfng youth, who perform*! his tasks punctually. They passed so easily through Lis hand that ho used only a short time for those over which many another pupil worked lanjr hours. Friedel would always learn only wow thjugs; for the old he knew by heart. ' *"B# hi a double allowance," the ina*ter ofiUm tttid( "he i� a vocativel" That was bis favorite name for the pupil who very often voxad bUo,-and even that could not ex* press it. A singlft � �tU|>lfl trick became juotnentous forLtbfl frJfoloua boy und his anxious father, A Jit tie pond wnptlod iU water into the brook that supplied the field mill. This pond ; vas tho proportiy of tbe Ktewaj-d, who hod mada tberein a place'tor brooding fish. One isroiing Frtodfil stood on tho uluieo th rough wbicli the water flowud otf, and puked with a irtlc^ in tho grating of tho gato, which was stopped up with grass and earth. "That would make a flno waterfall. If only it would let out more," thought the boy. A . pltuz field the sluice gato at sufljaient height 4ik&v* th� mirror Ilka surface of the poud. ' t(6Ae can certainly put that *>raewh�t :jOW*r;',Hj�ad Friedel, pulling at tho pluje, jsMfiU^wiaff it. At last, frojn.tfto hole. v vJBftr�*o"K�-� was too heavy for the boy-Ibfrod which joined the lower board with j^tniwatepBg odg* fall out of tbe tram- Dnng nann. tii�-,   ........ wauei- (food niRhod through tho now opened outlet. Although tho boy at first sprans; back terrified; he moved nearer again, and rftjotoed at the newly created, ilrtpetucrun, foaroifig waterfall. Theevll results which fonstiol-low his thonghtlcw deoit he did not comprehend, elfe ho would have gone hastily for help. For Home lime yet. he watched the 1m-poniiiK Fpeotacle, then hastened away. Milter Geraid had just been called to supper, wln'ii tho servant, hurrying nftcr him, came and told him the wat*r was rising remarkably fast. The wheel could hold out but litt'tt longer. Surely an opening must have Imhju made somewhere. While tho as sistant was sinking, a hiVing and roaring force! it* way to the miller's ear. With two or three ImhiiuIh he was in th* mtll. Tho wheel revolved as frantically as if it would grind iwdf to powder, aud the wator poured In ii; streams through tho lock, so that the whole llo*)r was covered. "God help us!" cried tho miller. ''.Stop the wheel, shut the upper gato and open the outlet pipe." The servant, as alarmed as his master, hurried out, and tried with much labor to give the wildly rushing waters another course, and at lust partially succeeded. Somo sacks with flour fn them, readv for ubo, were soaked through and through; others, containing corn, lay overthrown hi tho water. The wheel stopped at last. The miller could not explain U> himself this ex'^slve water-Uow. He hastened to put tilings in order that be might go to the foundation of this serioii-s all'nir. Gerard stood btill, sweating over the unlucky situation, when a man burst in at the door, rushed furiously at the amuzi'd miller, ami breathlessly exclaimed: "What pos�*Ks "ii do itl But only wait, it jdiad cost you dear-dear I What is lost to me in the pond, that you count out to mo in cash, us surely us I am the steward!" "Sir steward, you here!" cried the aston-isht.il milter. "Hut 1 do not understand yi>u, truly 1 tin not understand," ho continued. ''Thesluleo opened* It Heaven verify me; I have enough, yen, too much water; I need no dtduge. But there, wo for yourself what injury 1 have sulTered,M and he motioned the gj>ouk('i' into tho meal room. "Indeed, iudettl! Who could it have been, then I11 asked tho -steward. "A knavish churl, n madman," cried the milter, "who,must have escaped from ths bouse of correction, t>r from"- "And my ilsh," int�rrupto-'**- /.�d black acro*s4 her Jx'auty's wrwk- Voov wrf*'ik, that may net diet - tJes dead the flame she could not check, Nor can revivify. So, wan nnd writhen in despuir. So. frozen Mack hi stone, 'fliey He-the awful semblance thi*ro Of lives that I have knmvu. -Charles K. LuminlK In Frauk l>slle*H. A Startling; Prophecy. Nothing in tho future* appear* mure? probable than that within tin* lifetime of persona now living the industrial hii-premncy of Great Hritnin will pawn nwny with tho exhaustion of her eonl fields. Switzerland. Italy nud tho Scandinavian peninsula are destined to become tbe great manufae! tiring districts i>C Europe This extraordinary industrial revolution will be brought about by the transmission nnd distribution by elo.^trieal moan a of the inexhaustible nnd permanent water |k�wer in those countries. More than a year ago in .Switzerland 11 woolen manufactory with JJfl.OOO spindles, with the usual complement of uuxiliary machinery, was operated wholly hy electric power conveyed from :� distant stream, deriving its never failing supply of water from tho melting of Alpine snows. In the new era the Swims republic may not improbably become the foremost industrial nation of Europe.-Electrical Engineer. Condition of tlaytl. The country is naturally rich, but not rich enough to support the hordes of shameless, self seeking politicians anxious for their own enrichment. The cause for their appearance in such nuin* bora is easily explained. Tho many revolutions, with their cotiromitant murders, pillages and conflagrations, havo de-Htroyed industry and labor, and havo clewed all tbe avenues to tho attainment of a competence by honorable pursuits. Of what use is it to the peasant to plant cane or to cultivate coffee when at any moment tho genernLof the arroudiRse-ment may force him to abandon his crops to bear arras in support of someone who, in tbe set terms of the usual proclamation, has "raised the standard of revolution against the most odious of tyrants?" -Cor. New York Post. How Stnnley PunUlied a Traitor. One anecdote told by Mr. Stevens of the way in which Stanley disposed of the Egyptian officer who was convicted of having plotted tn hand the expedition over to the Malidi, is worth repeating. Stanley, who was suffering with acute gastritis, "had himself carried in a chair outside the tent. Turning to the incriminated ofticer he said: "Wo havo come through a thousand difficulties to save you and yours. Meanwhile you have been plotting to destroy us.   Depart to God." Saying these words, he pointed to a Iwugh of a tree, whefe justice was done after the fnsbi.m of Judge Lynch.-Pall Mall Gazette. was nsllvely nnd'healttiyan eviTtltwir atiTfier* was in the state," said a prison official.   "Ha had simply been playing tbe ftoap tricfe." "What's tbatr "Gating soap. The effect was to bleach his skin by producing a dearth of blood, or rather by changing the corpuscle*-increasing the white and diminishing the rend. There are no serious consequences following tho usn of soap, and when discontinued tho man rapidly gets well. "Governor Hendricks, naturally enough, was much chagrined over this deception and made an entry in this offioo to the effect that It was never safe to pardon a man merely because ho looked sick. Men In prison will do other things to excite sympathy and make it apjwar thut they are dying cf consumption, "Now and then a fellow will ntrike himself in the throat, or even cut himself ivltkln the throat or under the tongue. Then he will spit blood in the presence of tho physician, walk feebly, talk in a whisper, iiometimes they eat dirt, which stops digestion, and this Is followed by a falling off In flesh. "A short time ago a request was made for the pardon of a notorious criminal in the Southern prison on the ground that he was dying. Ho was upon that showing placed In the hospital, from which he escaped, but was captured four days la tor. "-Indianapolis Journal. Cannibal Dwarfs of the Congo .Vurest. Nelson had a curious aoeount to give of the dwarfB of the Congo forest. He describes them an the ugliest and most depraved Fpecl-mens of humanity he ever heard of. "Tu�y struck me as the dark and forbidding creatures of a bad nightmare," ho said, "rather than actual human beings," when hefirstsaw them. "Oh, they're a bad lot, I toll you. Somotlmea we struck a district where they poemed a trifle loss wild, or more confident, and they used to come in swarm9 to tho camp. They, of course, had never seen a white man before. "The most disagreeable thing about them was their guilty, sneaking expression. They are cannibals, of course, and It always seemed to mo that thoy came into our camp for the purpose of feasting their eyes on us, as a pack of hungry dogs might gaze longingly at a log of mutton. They could never look us In tho face. I havo felt their baleful game on me as 1 sat at my tent door, and tho moment that I looked all eyes would instantly be dropped. But I have detected them sizing up the others, and fairly licking their chops. It used to make my flesh creep. They used to pay more attention to Jepbson than any of us. Wo were uouo of us overburdened with brawn in thoBO days, but Jephson is of plumper build than any of tho others, hence his popularity with these impish cannibals. They admired Jephson because they saw at a glance that he would cut up into moro steaks and better rib roasts tlian we others."-Cor. New York World. Curing a Horwo by Faith. A curious instance of the effects of Christian science occurred nt Enu Claire, Wis., re-contly. There is quite a large circle of Btu-dents of the science in the city, nnd they hold regular meetings for the discussion of methods and cases. One of the number, a goutie-ma u who resides just out of the city, had a sick horse ou his hands. The veterinary surgeons could do nothing for tho animal, and the local Christian science experts failed also. Thereupon tho owner of tho hor*e, having plenty of time and not caring for tho expense, went to tho telegraph oflico and wired au account of the cam to a Christian science professor in Chicago. The Byinptoms wore given in the telegram, und tho Chicago ex-jiert was asked to treat tho case by the usual method. The horse was at that time apparently on \is last legs. Tho Chicago scientist wired back that he was treating the horso to the best of his ability, aud was thinking hard. Within five horn's tho horse was well aud eating oats. Tho caso was duly reported nt the next meeting of tho circle, and tho members are pursuing their experiments with renewed faith in tho science.-Chicago Herald. Thirty Day KING'S Sale of Carriage^ � Don't forget it. WiU'also sell Furniture cheaper than ever, buy until you*get my prices is all I ask. Have moved to 319 North Main street. Don't J*. KZIlTGr. Has been sold out. We have bought that elegant stock ofBoots and ShoeB, aTd costs ua 80c on $1. There is $15,000 worth of the best mattes of Shoes in the United States and every dollar's worth of tliein will.be sold for just t their former price within the next 60 days.  Come and buy good Shoes cheap while you can.     __ K. WEINBERG. Palace Shoe Store. 19 and 21 East Sherman Street,*! DOES A GENERAt TOB PRINTING Book Making CircuniKlnurrs Alter Casei. Northern Man (down in Florida)- "What's the price nf that orange grove? Native-Ten thousand dollars, mister. Mad the consumption long? "Consumption! I haven't consumption." "Just weak lungs, maybe?'' "My lungs are sound as a dollar. I am merely looking for a good place to locate; doesn't matter to nio whether it's north or south, east or west." 'Oh! Well, I'll let you have that grove for 9250."-New York Weekly. What Foes Signify. Night or morning fogs, or in winter persistent fogs, often signify a> culm, and settled condition of the air and the prevalence of fair weather. Heavy dews, especially in the autumn, likewise portend tine weather, but usually of shorter duration. Fogs appear usually in one of two conditions-either tho nir is noawy saturated up to a considerable height,or elye is unusually dry, except in a stratum iiuinediutely above the ground. -Exchange. Adulteration nf Food. The total food consumption per year in tin? United States amounts to 4,000,-000,000. It is estimated that 3 per cent, of thisH adulterated, or $90,000,000, of which 00 per cent, is harmlessly doctored. If the estimate be true, then there is an annual output of food containing poisonous adulteration to the amount of $0,000,000, while tho portion that is harmless reaches a total of $81,000,000.- American Grocer. Au Ancctloto uf King Gitorge. Que day, a hundred years ago, a benevolent looking man. clad like a farmer, meandered tuto a factyy, Tho men were taking their noon. "My lads," usked tbo stranger, "what aro you doing?1' "We're doing nothing now," answered tho men, "but presently wo shall be eating our dinner of bacon and beans." "Goodl" exclaimed tho stranger. "And if you have no objections 1 will eat bacon and beans with you." Tho furmor like stranger was his majesty George III, and ever sinco that day, in commemoration of that event, tho second Saturday in July is celebrated at the arsenal. Thero is given what is called tho "bean feast," and folk Kathor from all over tbo kingdom to participate therein.-Chicago News. China's Imperial Itaveane*. The Chinese Times, ot Tien-Tsin, In on article on tho revenue of tho central government of China, estimates it at &4,03J,UOO toels, or about *T 100,000,000. Tho main items avi 15,-&00,000 tiels from the foruigu customs and the same amount from sundry duties; 12,850,-000 taels from tho salt revenue, I'J,850,OO0 from tho likiii, or inland, transit duties, 10, 750,000 from tho land tax, 7,'JOO.OOO from opium, 4.0'X),000 from inland customs, and smaller turns from other sources. But, tho writer says, nt least twico this total sum is actually collected from tho jtcopUt "tho half of which is unaccounted for, beinr" ansorbed by tha provincial officials, a fraction only bo-iug applied to any local public purposes." Selecting Teas. * "As regards- educating tha sense of smell," writes a tea dealer, "I am strongly of opinion that it is possible, with eoustaut practice, to value teas ns correctly by smelling tbe infused leaf as by tasting. I have bought thousands of chests lu public sale by smelling the infused leaf ouiy,aud have constantly valued public Bale teas on the same plan. Nevertheless, for blending purposes it is absolutely necessary to taste,"-Pall Mall Gazette, Forgot UlmteUT. American Heiress-Gradoiul My hair is coming down. Won't you pleat*) puna that bunch back into its place and hold it while 1 fatten itl Count De La Fayerte Mont Moreney-Cer-tainoW'Ug, meea. Dair, eet ees iin.**h. Next! -Nuh York Weekly. The inhabitants of the earth number about 1,000,000.000; of these about &\,000,000 die every year, nearly one each second. Tbere ar�il,0o4 languages spoken, and there are more than 1,000 religions. The number of men is about equal to the number of women, and tho average of life la about thirty three yaws. _        _ Ur, HI Weir Mitcholl Is said lately to havo received a curious present from a young womuii whom he bad rescued from nervous Invalidism. It was a cord of white oak chopped down and taw4d by her own hands and sent as evidence ot her strength and health. Among tbo books in Governor Hill's library at Albany are "The Art. of Nuriing," "To-baooo�dnd AWohol;" "Ctott& &r^lTj^r&, all bfwbm books ha hu road and reread. W3ed� That Travel. The thistle and some other weeds have winged seeds, and these not uufrequebtly travel 800 miles in a day In a' passenger car and by rail,,are swept out at the end of the journey, find a' suitable habitat, take root and grow. Thero are plants growing in Kirk wood between the railroad tracks which are only found iu Kansas, the seeds being brought on the railway trains.-St. Louis Republic. A flood Memory. 'How far back can you remember, Bobby?" Ubked his undo. "Well," said Bob, "I can remember when I didn't know how to play mar-nles." "No further buck than that?" "Oh, yes; I can remember when 1 wouldn't remember at all."-Harper's Bazar.___ A Prog tfbat Dies of Old A^e. A frog in Nicaragua, colored red and blue, fearlessly, hops about in tho day time. It has perfect faith in its turning color. No bitake or bird will touch it, tor it is disgusting to the taste, and the doonerit is recognized tho better.-Cath-olio Woxl-;. Trlcljs.of CouvloU. Henry Bout^iguto was oueof tho men en-^nged in rob plug the Indiana National bunk iomo years ago in wh*t was knovyn as the "oraugo box robbairy,** the box being used to ntand upon wht'o the thief ranched over the ;lass framework upon theeouut�r and lifted 'jutsoveral thousand dollars 'in bank notes-it was, 1 think, #20,000 or ftSUS.OM. BouthgutoV friends pressed an application tor pardon ou the fpvundtha�.ha>waa dying o, consumption. Governor Rondricka believed hlu story'and pardoned him. "In a ve^y VAiQCt time fift�r_bi& rol&a� 6finttUEA.te Kat Before Sleeping;. Han, by long practice, will train himself to sleep on an empty stomach, but iz is more the sleep of exhaustion than tho sleep of refreshment. He wakes up after such a troubled sleep feeling utterly miserable until bo has hud a cup of coffee or some other stimulant, ami he has so injured the tono of his stomach that he has Uttle appotite for breakfast Whereas, one who aUowi himself to sleep after a comfortable meal awakes strengthened, and his appetite has been quickened by that preceding indulgence.-American Analyst.   '___ Ue Uaa Left School. Mrs. Griggs (meeting an bid friend)-And what Is your son doing? Mrs. Ronkiu-Oh, bo's a doctor. "Indeed I  Of what school!" "No school at all. He graduated three yean ago."-Harper's Bazar. Another Case. "What did you say killed Johnson!"  "Electricity." "The alternating cunentf' "I can't say; but it was that kind that the exports say won't kill."--Vankee Blade, He Took Nd Chances. "And what is tho lady's name," asked tha Jeweler, as he finished engraving in the ring "Augustus to"-- "Well, 1 don't know just yet. But I'm going to find out to-night and I want to take the ring along to show that I mean business. At tbe Bame tin"* you understand 1 don't waste any chances. The blank can staud till some* body's eatisOed to nil It. "--Philadelphia Time*. A Farewell Song. How hard It Is to say f-ood-by | How slowly come* the parting word) How stoutly clings each tender tie! How many saddening thoughts are stirred! Cut debta there are that must bo paid] Releutless fate ere has her wlU. Too long, alas, have 1 delayed-* Good-by, my sweet ten dollar bill _Washington Post. A w-alse Alarm. Mr. Blinks (entering where there are set era! ladies}-I am sorry that X am late, but bad to attend a rat- ' Chorus Kit Ladies (jumping on chairs, tables, �tc.)ii-0�horrorsl WheroUttt Mr. i Bhpk�"(oontiimitt8>^ A ratification meeting.-Lawrence American. -AND- me HSIIII! Ml MRU Journals, Ledgers, Balance Books, Minor Abstract Books, Blank Books of all kinks, Land Examiner's Books Loan Kegisters, County Eecords, Manilla Copy Books, Ward Kegistration Books, White Paper Copy Books, Scale Books a specialty Real Estate Contraot Books, Attorney's Collection Registers. The above is only a partial list of the goods we oar--' ry and the work we are prepared to execute promptly. We are making a specialty of Magazine Book Binding! and we bind Magazines and Law Books in all styles and at lowest prices. We wish the public to understand that we are ready and prepared to execute any kind of Printing or Book Work I Have stock forms, but can make special forms to order. We guarantee all work and solicit patronage. Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention. � Address, NEWS PRINTING AND PAPER GO., * "jHutchlnson, K&s. 30   

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