Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Hutchinson News Newspaper Archive: April 6, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Hutchinson News

Location: Hutchinson, Kansas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - April 6, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                f     rr J    1 ^ ' ,     (, v v    .-A bill was passed increasing to eleven the membership of the board of managers of the National Home for disabled volunteer soldiers, and making the following appointments: ..Edward N. IJerritt of Kan sag, for the unexpired term of office of John A. Martin, deceased; Alfred L, Rearson of Pennsylvania, for the unexpired term of office of John F. Hartraf t, deceased; Win. �5. Franklin of Connecticut, John O. Black of Illinois, Augustus lA^'arnham ot Maine, and G. W. Steele of Indiana, for their terms of eltlce commencing on April 31,1890, to fill vacancies occasioned by the expiration of terms of office and by the incrense provided hereby. On motion of Mr. Boutelle of Maine the house went into committee of the whole, Mr. Butterworth of Ohio in the chair, on the senate joint resolution for the removal of the naval magazine from Ellis Island, N. Y. harbor. The resolu tion authorizes the secretary of the navy to take Immediate measures for the re-, moval of the uaval magazine from Ellis Island. Seventy-five thousand dollars is appropriated to enable the secretary of the treasury to improve KIllo Island for immigration purposes. After a long de bats the committee rose and the joint resolution was passed with unimportant amendment which will necessitate its return to the senate. . The hour of ii o'clock having arrived yjmblio business was suspended and the tbouse proceeded to pay tribute to tha Xmemory of Newton W. Nutting, of Nev� Tfork. After eulogistic addresses by Jlessrs. Paine, Blanchard, Peters, Sherman, Henderson of Illinois, and others the house as a mark of respect to the memory of the deceased adjourned. To Regulate Elections of Keuil>ers, -Washington, April B.-A conference of the Republican members of the senate' committee on privileges and election was | held here to-day as a result of which Chairman Hoar was requested to prepare a bill to regulate elections of mem-! bfltt of congress. It is understood that themeaaure to be proposed, will provide for the appointment of national supervisions for every district In -.vhlch a certain number shall petition therefor that the supervisors shall watch, and count, and make a statement to the board of Canvassers, who shall thereupon Issue certificates of election to candloates receiving the highest number of voteB and these certificates shall be used by the clerk of the bouse in making up the roll of members elected. Petitioning for '�wo Harbors, Lawuenok, Kan,, April 5.-The Farmers' Institute of Douglas county In session to-day passed a resolution petition Ing congress to establish not less than two harbors on the Gulf of Mexico, one of tbem being as nearly centrally located between New Orleans aud Galveston as practicable, which would be at tho mouth of the Colcascuri river, and the other at Galveston. Representing that such harbors would be of great advantage to the farmers ot the country between the Missouri and the Rockies' for the moving of the crops of all tbe northwestern states. Election of Officers. Lawiitjnob, Kan, April 5.-The Kan saB principals, at their first annual meeting here to-day, elected the following officers for the year: President-Principal Larimer of To-peka. Vice-President -Principal Clar* of Minneapolis. Baeretary and Treasurer-Prinoipal May of Lawrence. Executive Committee-Principal Geo. Ryan of Leavenworth and Principal Jones of Abilene, 11 No. 201 ne involved In a quarrel and jgjjoot Biirgiu, The cap failed to I .nd Burgin fled to a saloon jiwas followed by John Sloan, a , James. There both Burgin j,91oan drew revolvers and fired jtxpusly and both fell dead. Sloan &,!o one of the best families in SgDorhood and the tragedy has f'ich excitement. })KQ TO STK.1I, A BROKE*.  . ThW PJ tici Koi am CO! tbn agel Jol Phi acol in om rivi coi 1 phj Mi sail ooj ch( 81 thj wej re^ th  three detectives.  His. business tt ead the robbers to the safe and to igress. The decoy did that part itilly.   No watchman interfered titn.  The doors were open and - wan speedily reached, hy held the candle while the itroku open the safe and secured 'iplets and the drawings. ,As they iming out of the door suddenly :en confronted them with pointed !!>, and one of the armed men K-l guess we'll take these things ^iSB and you with them." In the a of the men were found the jY.t and the plans. There were Bn:efore Justice Bourne and held in Vhe Gltlgena Voreecl to Vacate Their BomeH and Keek Higher Quarters on Aeernnt of the (sudden Blue-The Negroes In a Pitiable Condition-A Family Poisoned at ChloRKo-Mnvder In Oklahoma-i he Bfettman Murder- A Convict Kgcapes- Fire at Watertown, New lorlc. Gbbbnvillb, MIsb, April B.-The levee which bas so long been In great danger of breaking at Catfish point, near the Connelly plantation in Bolivar county, about twenty miles by land above Gveen-vllle, gave way Friday, and from the latest reports the crevasse is from 1,700 to 1,800 feet wide and still increasing. The levee there is very sandy and the wash will be bad. The water reaohed Greenville about 8 o'clock this morning and up to this time has risen one toot an hour in the streets and is still rising. Tie water is making its way over sidewalks into stores. A great many people had to vacate their residences to seek higher quarters on account of the sudden rUe. Bouses of all descriptions and fences in long sections are easily carried away by the terrific current, and every kind of household goods are floating down the river. Stock and worldly effects that can be transported are now being hurried to the high lands. In the neighborhood of Salpwlth tents are badly needed by the colored people. At every step the colored laborer, hie family and his all are found destitute and arrayed in garments that altjrd them no protection trom the howl log winds. If no assistance comes to them many will die from exposure. The gjvornment officers have done a great deal of good in that section, but as mere are localities v.liich are now showing signB of approaching distress their .nouns have to be divided. The Lake Washington country and its highest points on the banks of the beautiful lake are also entirely disappearing out of sight, a thing which has. not been known since 1854, the outlook ia not hopeful for the planting of the overflowed region before May. Just as soon as the water subsides sufficiently the breas: will be temporarily closed so that the crop may be protected against any future raise this season. THE BACEj. The Canteen System. WAearaoTON, Aprils.--In the senate to-day Mr. Hall gave notice that he -would propose the following amendment to that section of; the army appropriation hill to establish the canteen system In the' army: providing that no alcoholic liquors, including beer or wine, shall be gold or supplied to the enlisted men in "any canteen, or In any room or building 'at any garrlBoa or military post." This amendment was rejected by the house. Confirmations. WasotnutoW, April 5.-The following confirmations were made to-day: 0)ar-enoe D.Clark, associate justice of thesu-prfifo court pf Wyoming; John G. . JJiUfiell/pension agent at Columbus, O.; Edward E. Harvey, pension agent at De troty. ojr y> ~ DieeuealnA* the Mirer QuasUosi. ^.W^^ramOTOM, April 5. - About ?- /- jlkjrdi of the fiepubliean sen ^ftw"**tt;W�tf*�w* -JhvalgM .�t She Rhode Island LeglKleture. Nbwvoiit, R. I., April 5.-The supplementary election to-day for first and fourth representatives resulted in the election of two Democrats, William P. Olfctk, by 78 majority and Andrew K. Quinn by 33 majority. It ib possible that the election is not legal as it wbb held under the old voting system under the provisions ot the new ballot law. If the house is Democratic, as it probably is, the Republicans may appeal to the supreme court to decide as to their legality. Formed a Conferenoo of Bis Own. Dks Moines, Ia, April 5.-Bishop Bowman who was locked out of Trinity thurch by the trustees and whom the Des Moines conference of the Evangelical church refused to recognize as its presiding officer yesterday organized a conference of his own and transacted some business. The session was held at the bishop's rooms at his hotel. A presiding elder and a trustee of the northwestern college, of which Bishop Bowman ia president, were elected. Steeling Adjourned. CmoAOo, April 5.-The committee appointed at the special meeting ot railroad presidents last week to report a form of agreement adjourned to-day until April 15. This will probably be the end of the movement to reorganize the Interstate Commerce Railway Association as the Missouri Pacific la evidently antagonistic to the muvement and the other roads will not enter into an agreement in which the Missouri Pacific is not a party._ Irrigation Meeting. Cohonado, Kan., April 5.-[Special J- The irrigation meeting advertised to convene at Leoti was largely attended by prominent people from all over this judicial district. The object ot the meeting was to devise ways and means to irrigate western Kansas and it was finally decided that the Beaver and White Woman would furnish sufficient water to thoroughly irrigate the counties through which these Btreams run. Minister! Bebuked. Nbw Yoke, April 5.-At the Methodist Eplucopal confeience today Bishop Goodsell ia his address said ministers should not sit on the fence waiting to make up their minds which way to go. Politicians were expedient, they said one thing .and meant another. Methodists had no business to resort to such meat-urea. The liquor trlffie was roundly de* Bounced,- � - . A Kentucky Bhootingj, SoMbbto**, Ky, April 6.-Lost night James SIoa* while making a settlement at Greenwood with B-Btirgln, a colored At Washington. /iimoTON, D. O., April 5.- 'hea wao a large crowd in attendance th- Bennings course to-day. The itkr was beautiful,the traok fast and ruing good. n; race-Purse $500, divided for 3->ds, five furlongs: Captain Wag- �ond. Time, 1:63. ti race-Gentlemen riders' purse, )ne mile: Jim Murphy won. 53^. tt race-Purse $500, divided, sell-ao, eight furlongs; Manhattan won, K-arns second, lime, 1:17. byter ionbj conae At New Orleans, jw OM.banb, April 6. -The new j�uu& Jockey club, spring meeting, bti clear and pleasant; attendance |f .ie meeting; track lumpy. �t nee-Selling purse $250, six fur--kobelofE won, Llda L second. 113^. ' ion: race-Purse $300, for 3-year-jfpu furlongs: Katuna won, Ferri-icead. Time, 0:51. I race-Morris stakes for 8 year-n! upwards: Bonnie King won, ttl*/ Becond. Time, 1:46&. race-Purse $350: Alphonzo Pa I Mall second. Marchburn third. P^.._^__ Sullivan Wilt right. , April 5-John L. Sullivan pH night that be was willing to He desire of J. M. Oorbitt, the i-olsco heavy welgnt, to box him ppuids, and that he would contract |Crbitt to sleep in that time. Sul-ail: "If I succeed I am to get I I don't he gets the money." an M. J. Blattery, of the Gladstone |t Providence, who was present at Sterview, said that the club would Kp.rse of $1,000 for the contest, if nldbe arranged for April 23. ' Billy |ej and John L. are desirous of ^'ci a match between Jaok Mc-til Patty Kerrigan, and will back fe, tor $3,500.__ ^      Favor* Revision. Hi, Kaa., April 5,-Solomon pres-nich 1b In session favored rovU-�B vote of 2 to 1. They recommend '.Ivo action, u POISONKD THE FAMtXT. A Servant Girl tfuspected of Administering- Itongh-on-Kats. OinoAoo, April 5.-George E. Noonan and hlB wife of Englewcod died suddenly this morning and their daughter is seriously ill from the effects of poison given last night. A servant gill named Emma Stork is suspected, she left this morning for La Torte, Ind. The police hove been telegraphed to arrest her. Frank Newland, a groT?n up son was also poisoned and, although very sick, it is not thought that his life is in danger. The maid servant hud been in the service of the famliy only one day and no cause can be assignddfor her commission of the crime if she in fact committed it. Yesterday afternoon she complained that she was sufferiag from toothache and the daughter, Miss Grace, aged 16 years, gave her money to boy medicine to relieve it The supposition is that she boughtrough on rats which Bhe administered to the family at Bupper in some canned corn. Mr. Newland was a well known citizen, a retired real estate dealer, and lived in an elegant house in Engle wood. i. This evening a woman answering the suspected servant's description, waa arrested at the Park theatre. She denied all knowledge of the poisoning, or of the Newland family, though positively identified by a number of persons as being the suspected girl. The prisoner said Bhe was a variety actress under the alias of Delia Foster and that her real name was Mrs. Star. Wm. R*y her husband from whom she was living a part, being a bill poster in Ft. Wayne, Ind. MAKES SPECIFIC OBABOKB. twenty of which were residences. Tho Are originated in tfce store of F. N. Peck, which was closed by the sheriff last evening. There was a furnace in the building and as there had been no fire In the stove for some time it is '.bouulit the lire is the work of incendiary. The village has no fire apparatus and help was called from thle city, the steamer and firemen arriving too late to be of much assistance. The WM lossis about $135,000 � e. OVKlt A WlFK'.-t HtoI.KS AFFEOTIONS A OleTeland Dry Ooode Merchant Want* (85,000 From a Prominent Phyilolan. Cleveland, O., April 5,-Geo. Sinclair, a dry goods merchant of this city, has today sued Dr. D. B. Smith for $35,-000 damages for alienating his wife's affections. Sinclair alleges in his petition that Dr. Smith has been intimate with his wife since June, 1889, Mrs. Sinclair having been a constant visitor at hia office. Sinclair engaged two detectives to shadow his wife and surprised them at the doctor's office last Saturday night Nc action for divorce against Mrs. Sinclair accompanied this petition, as the husband is said to be foolishly fond of hi* wife in spite of the discouraging developments. Dr. Smith, who 1b one of the best known physicians in the city, declares hiB innocence of any wrong doing. Sinclair is losing the sympathy he had when he knocked Dr. Smith into the gutter after the denouncement Saturday nigut, by reason Of his hiring private detective and the haste he displays in trying to make money out of the affair. Dr. Smith's party organ bitterly opposes hiB reelection to the echool board for per aonal reasons, which has also somewhat turned the tide of sympathy in his favor, over a game of oabds. One Gambler Fatally Shoota Another at Kingfisher, 1. T. KiNOFisHEii, I. T, April 5.-Jake Pe-l-corri shot and fatally wounded Jake Oline during a quarrel over a game of curds this afternoon. Pecorri Is a gambler and came here from Wichita, where he is well known. He w�i, kuown here by the name of "Italian Jake." Ollne was also a gambler. He will die from his injuries. Pecorri had a record as a deBperate man, having killed two men at Joplm, Mo., several years ago. Another Aceoant. Kihokibhkb, I. T., April 5.-Jacob Cline waa shot aud killed by Jacob Pecora at 1 o'clock this afternoon. The hooting occurred on a publia street, Both were gamblers and the trouble came from a diagreement over a ehell game. Ollne has a family in Wichita and Pecora is single. The murderer waa arrested and is iu the custody of the military. This is the first murder occurring at tills place. ?orpedo Bocte Ordered, i. April 0.-The government has 1 tje construction ofthirty torpedo > private yards. The Weather. otoTON, April 5.-Forecast till 8 ifiday.-For Kaaau: Fair; fol threatening weather;, light fcooler; variable vrinda. Formal Complaint Blade- Against John Mettman for the Murder of Hie Wire. Kansas City, April 5.-A special to the Star from Leavenworth says:. Marshal Doane made formal complaint against John Mettman this morning. The com plaint charges him with the willful, malicious and deliberate murder of hia wife, Theresa Mettman, on tho night of her disappearance. Mettman's examin alien will be held on Monday next at 3 o'clock. To-day a woman named Mrs. Williams, who lives on the edge of the military reservation, reported that on the night the murder is supposed to have been committed, that she heard two pla-tolBhota at 11:30. The reports Beemed to come from the direction of the Mettman neighborhood. Her husband is provost guard at the fort, on duty during the day. He also heard the shots, but supposed them to be a signal for a lire in the garrison, and consequently paid no further attention to them. This would seem to lend mpie ot a color of truth to the statement made in the letter written by the Pole, Geroofskosay. Stabbed Him In the Back. Abilene, Kan., April 5.-A special to the Reflector from Manchester, in the north part ot Dickinson county, says This morning about 8 o'clock Pat Bud kins, section boss of the Santa ft, and Tteo. Wiler, proprietor of the Globe hotel, became engaged in an altercation when Budkins stabbed his opponent in the back. The wound Is a serious one and he is not expected to live. His as gallant has been bound over (or trial, a Destructive Fire. " Watbbtows, N. y. April 5.-The business section ot the village of Therea about twenty-five miles from tbisoity was entirely destroyed by fire, thi* morn' tug, forty-two buildlugt were burned, ducing wounds which are fatal.. It lg surmised that bis depression was due to the recent death of his favorite daughter, the wife of ex-Mayor Carter 11, Harrison. Mr, Stevens was one of tho leading members of the board of trade and leaves an estate worth perhaps $1,500,000. A JTJBOR ARRESTED. For5teullnsr�n Orerooat Be 1� Sent to the JSnfA.** ft? Clo�-��flf,l�u Boston, April 5.-A number of the jurors of the iwcond session of theum'>.-rior cHl court sat in their seats abi-ut 0 o'clock yesterday waiting to be ewocri In. Among tho others was John W. kUlght.a man about 45 years of age, who wore a most- inoffensive and innocent expression on hta face, A i'ew minutes before the time for tho swearing in of the jury Special Officers Watts and Blockly of Division 3 entered the court room, aud after a whispered conversation with Hsight the three retired to the hallway. The officers had arrested the juryman on a charge of larceny, he being accused of stealing an overcoat from the office of Mr. W. P. Duncan, No. 173 Washingtsn street, on March 18. tl sight denied all knowledge ot the affair, but on being searched four pawn tiokets were foundln hiB pockets, On beiug or dered by the officer to do bo, he wen with them to the pawn shop of a Mr Pago on Salem street, where the overcoa of Mr. Duncan was recovered. They then all went back to the municipal court, where Halght was tried and sentenced to four months in the house of correction. At one time Halght wnt a clerk in the street department at City hall, with a salary of $1,400, and was also a leading politician In ward Seventeen, where he formerly lived. He has been drinking very hard for the last few years, it is said, and so lost his position at City hall, and also many of hlfl /riends. He owes many people, It 1b claimed, and in one of his pockets was found a written agreoment with a Mr. Waldron In which, for one dollar, he assigned all hie forthcoming wages as juror for April, amounting to seventy-five dollars. Height has been in curtody before. GERMAN AFFAIRS. The Publlo Still Decline to Believe Bismarck's Retirement Final.  le party went down. The nan had a narrow escape, but the women were drowned. The Opening: One. Bt. Louis, April 5.-The Chicago and Cleveland- Players' League teams opened here today, and Cleveland won by hard hitting. Bartzen and Farrel and Gruber and Brennan were the batteries. Brown ing, MoAleer and Latham made home runs. The following is the Bcore: Chicago...........8 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0- Cleveland..........10111081 �-8 Drowned While Trying to Escape. ViCKBnauo, Miss., April 5.-A raft containing twenty negroes who wore try ing to escape trom the flood was capsized yesterday in the mouth of Bayou Fallitya, the rapid current having carried the frail orBft against a tree. Only thirteen ot the crew reaohed shore alive. Morr.Ee Marks Got a Message From Wife and Shot Blmsolf. New Youk, April 5.-Morris Marks, a commission merchant and Bilk importer, killed himself yesterday afternoon in the back parlor of his house, 67 EastTwelfth street, becruse ot the refusal of his wife, who left him two weeks ago, to return to him. Uia housekeeper, Mre. Carolina B. Elliot, went into the room to r>,ake a fire and found Mr. Marks stretched on the folding bed In his night clothes. He bad a pis tol in blB hand, and a wound back ot his tight ear. On hlB breast was a faded white roBe, which the housekeeper remembered having Been in the hand ot his little 10-year-old stepdaughter on Monday afternoon. The girl brought the rose and some message from her mother. Nobody in the house knows what the message was, but it made Mr. Marks gloomy. His wife was Mrs. Lotts Beosley, a widow, when he married her in October last. They lived together in apparent happiness until two weeks ago, when they disagreed and she left him. He had been assiduously trying to get her back, and he frequently remained away from his place of business, during the day, hoping that she would return. He came home at noon yeBterday from his place of business, 86 Spring street, lowered the folding bed and undressed, The housekeeper says she did not hear the report of the pistol. He had been dead an hour when Bhe found him. He was 88 yearB old and a native of New York. He belonged to several Hebrew Bocietien and was well-to-do. WIUj IT bs fulfilled? High Water in Mississippi Points to a Realisation of the Flood Prophecy.' New Obl2anb, April 5.-A dispatch received from Rolling Fork, Miss., at a late hour last night cays: The water in Deer creek has risen four feet in the last thirty-six hours and is now running over its banks on tbe east side and ie still rising at the rate of a half lnoh an hour. Every foot of dry land in Rolling Fork will be under water before morning Passenger train No. 7 from Memphis due here last night did not arrive till this morning and could go no further. After remaining here for several hours it was turned around and ordered back to Le land. The train men Bay that It is Impossible to get back there with It as the traok between Panthurburn and Nitta Yuma floated oft of its bed after the train passed over it this morning. Aoonsed of Insnltlng; Women. New Yoiie, April 5.-A well-dressed young man with broad Bhouldera sauntered up and down Sixth avenue from Thirty-fourth street to Fortieth street last night and lifted his hat to several women. At 8:15 o'olock Policemen Per kins and Murphy walked up, tapped him on the shoulder and told bim ha l prisoner. They said that he had insulted women by grabbing their arms and running against them. The youug man wrestled wit*, the policeman, who were in plain clotheB. He called them bunco steerers. They took him to the Thirtieth street station. There he said he was Robert J. Irving, a broker, of 140 Duf field street, Brooklyn. He had $828 in hiB pocket. He denied the charge of the policemen and threatened to make things warm for them. He was held. Billiard Tournament. OnioAQO, April 6.-The billiard tournament at Central music hall iu which Shaeter, Maurio, Daly and otber celebri ties are to participate, opened to-n'ght before an audience of nearly d,000 people The evoninif was devoted to a game between Hlier>en and Catton, the former playing 500 points to Cation's 350. Bloc son played admirably and won with ease. The Emporvr Again Betases to Consent to ibo Publication of the Chancellor's Letter. t'tje Opening of the Belehstag- and the Iloyal Speeoh is Awaited With Interest-Home Politics Overshadowed by Colonial Affairs-Ths amptvror will Decline to Consent to the Adoption of any Colonial Policy Antagontstlo to England-Other Matters, Behlin, April 5.-{Copyrighted 1890 by the New York Associated Presa.J-The events of the week have indicated even more than the resignation of the chancellor of the new era in Germany. It is impossible that the emperor could have been an unaffected spectator of the unending tributes of adrnk-uion and respect that poured upon hia discarded minister. It la reported today that he has again refused to consent to the publication of Bismarck's letter of resigns' Uon. The public still declines to believe thtjt the retirement ot Bismarck is final, it being urged that he is by five years the junior of Gladstone, and may still count upon a decade of activity. Tbe opening of the Reichstag and the royal speech ie awaited with Interest. in vlewof tbecertalnty of a redistribution of parties the preparation of new military and colonial measures will probably be delayed until the beginning of Ma7. Herr Richter ie expected to resign from tbe Liberal committee In the Reichstag as he has already done from the Liberal committee of the diet hie personality bli.-cklng a mutuf.l npproaoh of the Liberal groups. Dr. Wlndtboi-p claims three indls-penolble concessions in retura for his support of the government. Jhe return ot all rellgiousorderstind relig'xus teaching in the Bchools and the removal of a discretional) revocable bh&iacte:;- ttca all concessions made to the Catholic paity. The Centralists are we.lawareot the strength of their position and intend to derive every possible advantage therefrom. According to the National Ztitung the new military bill provides for a permanent increase ot 18,000,000 marks in tho annual expenditure. For the moment colonial affairs overshadow home politics. Herr Von Der-heydt the financial backer ot the east Africa company recently declared in the Wochtnblatt that Prince Bismarck'b departure was the aigu of a new and an energetic colonial policy. Herr Belch-ardt, the explorer, in a lecture showed that it Is of the u-most importance to iiecure possession of Tabora, which place 1b further inland, and Nipawapawa in the dlreotion of Lake Tanganyika and the Victoria Nyanza, Thit> and the strengthening of the treaty putting in the German space of interest appear from tbe most diligent inquiries to be the tola object of the Emin-Wissman expedition. The talk of the recapture of Wadelai is baaed upon mere surmise. The exact scope of the expedition will not be known until the bill of supplies is before the Reichstag. What is certain, however, is that the emperor will decline to consent to the adoption of any colonial policy antagonistic to England. During the recent visit of the Prince of Wales, the emperor did everything possible to show the value he attached to a close friendship between the two powers. The emperor's solicitude regarding tho army la further shown in an imperial order published to-day, to the effect that in view of the reserve military officers system hitherto puiBued, which provides that officers must come from the ranks ot the military, must be extended to Include those who have done good service, shall feel anxiety about facing sacrifices which might seem incumbent upon them if they held regimental command. Incono'uslon the emperor desires that the habits of the aapirantB Bhall be submitted to him with those of officers who do not conform with a simple life an 1 that all officers ot rank must be of noble birth and ot good moral habits. The emperor further disapproves the holding of commissions,being dependent on the private Income of the aapirantB. The decrees that the pay of officers of rifles, foot, artillery and pioneer* shall be increased by forty five marks monthly. That ot oHoors of field artillery by Bev-enty-five marks and that of officers of cavalry by 150 marks. The Color Line In the Church, Cuahlkbton, B. 0., April 5�-The war in the Episcopal church here about the admission of negroes to the dleceaan convention is waxing hot. The elections for delegates to the diocesan convention are held Monday, and moBt of the congregations are divided into negro and anti-negro parties. A circular leeued today nominates a ticket for delegates to represent St. Philip's church, pledged to absolute separation of the races in the Episcopal church. The compromise party are seeking to admit the Rev. J. H. M, Pollard, the colored rector of St. Mark'B church, and to draw the line there. The slogan of the stratghtout anti-negro party, io"No negroes need apply." rl   _ liirlven Fnrthcr Ashore. New Yoiik, April 5.-Up to this afternoon the French steamer Panama, which run ashore at Jones' Inlet, L. I,, early Thursday morning, had not been gotten off, and the wind by shifting to the southeast t" day drew the vesrel further up on the aiiore, and it is now feared that the steamer will go to pieces. The cargo 1b very valuable trad it is feared will become a tots! iusa If not cocfefderably damaged. Several tugs are on ths scene ol tho wreck, and every effort ia being made to get the steamer off. Committed Suicide. OmpAoo, April 5^-B, 0, Stevens, one of Chicago's oldest and wealthiest tetl dents, attempted suicide at bis handsome raaldaniia �n �MU. 1 �ev*nwK>u memoert ;
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication