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Hutchinson News: Friday, April 4, 1890 - Page 1

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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - April 4, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                *a* THEY WERE IR RES IS TA BLE! We advertised that last week's prices on Dinneware "would be, and our immense sales on the THE BflOAOWAY PARADE A Pew MiMt Mmi ina Stmpplne bbttrlet und 111* fthOptx'ra. The Broadway ot tho promfnndefa is divlc'lei' into tliroo parts. g.)oc1n has proven the assertion1J^1?^" - �hopp*8 m*ict' to be true.  This week we will offer to our LAMPS AT COST! Also give you an opportunity to buy Chamber sets at the fol-_ lowing reductions: JDecorstpd Chamber Bets........................... 2 HI), reduced from $ ..............    8 06, ' Plain white 10 piece Chamber Beta. Choice Sets will not last long at these prices, bo make your purchase) before they are picked ever, lil'S CHINA HALL P. S.-We have recently increased our facilities so that we are now able to offer the wholesale trade some splendid drives.  Write us for quotations. FL0W.K11S USE)) FOli FOOD. VARIOUS  KINDS THAT ARE   EDIBLE AND   ARE   EATEN. 8tew�Ml I.lllea at � I-ndIM' Lnii'-lif-mi-I-o-i'iuI Klorrffr* IHp|MMl 111 llatt.-runil I'rlrtl In Oil--TIM TliMli- Family -A Komi Cak�-Cnmllfri IlloitMima. "Aniiimls ffed, man oats, but ilio (mm of intolli-ct ulone knows how to oat." So sayH ff. man versed in wisdom. Anil truly lie was wise, for tlit; "fato of nations depends upon how they're fed." Cooking is a scienee, and the author who declared that "the discovery of a new dish does more for the happiness of mankind (hull the discovery of a new planet," was evidently a philosopher, for all men ure Interested in cooking. Flowers! The very word is lhv; quint-cnsence of jwetry, fra^ranee and beauty A dinner, novel in the extreme, was given by an eastern girl, a wealthy debu Uinte. The dinner was served in great magnificence, and at it "stewwl lilies' was the most favored dish. It didn't matter at all that the "stewed lilies" resembled inferior greens or caul flowers in appearance, and as to taste- imagination fails to convey its awful wishy-wHShincss, if the anti|N)dal terms be allowed, yet every g\r\ at tlw table declared an she dipped her fork into tho stewed novelty that they were "perfect' ly delicious, you know," and they could eat them "every day." No pepper, no aalt, no aoupcon of butter defiled this purity of tho lily stow;, forbid, god of fashion,-perish the thought, oh, cnisin of (Esthetic foodl the lilies were stewed simply intact and eaten simply and witli tact. For no muscle of the tortured fashionable gourmunde's face betrnyed the fooling that she was eating u dish that was similar to washed out sunshine or the ghost of a stale spongecake. They wero stewed lilies all the same, and if eaoh partaker turns her head away at the sight of the flower in full bloom for some time to come, why inquire further- I tho raero fact of the effects of a first cigar to banish forever the habit of smok ing others? J A DIN'NEK OF 1-OCUSTO. 1  Not very long since an article in an eastern paper spoke of u clever woman's subterfuge in cooking in following uiun uer. "Tho latest novelty in the vegetable line is tho introduction of flowers, that is edible flowers.   The two which are said to tut thomof.1, .ndisfuctory belong absit (anon! to tho thistle family, and rejoice in the names raliigonum poly gonorde.s and hastia lulitlior.   The |mpu lur form of YiolU English and Kroncl seems somehow hard to eonijuer in if ease of these new dished, but doubtlei all will come, in time.   It is related of bright Boston woman that oni.'e \vliil-,i she was living in the country uhruuil, ii a spot where tho markets were extreme ly umvliitble, she was sui'pnaod one day by the arrival of several guests near t In hour of dinner. It chanced, as it usually does in similar eases, that her lard that day was especially pare; so she set to wor'.; 1 to ovetvo trees hi'i-i the i! and f prow uh:;|- r/ncier Charlemagne's reign the ilevices for cooking into which flowers were in sorted were several, w-hile in the Seven toenth century the women of the gentlest birth, greatest wealth and highest \Ktsl tiou in court took the greatest personal interest in their kitchen and its result) A favorite method of giving fish the taste of flowers at this time was to boil them in rose water. The flavor was so thoroughly impregnating that you would imagine the lieh was a rose itself. Tho mode of dining in this century was one of great magnificence. The rose as an article of food has a history which goes away liuek. It was well known to the ancient Greeks and Romans.-St. Louis I'ost-Dispatch. r.wits as her only assistants i.in' the dillleiilty.   The locust hi in full bloom, so she selected I i !;: (its. dipped them in batter I t':i-ui in boiling oil.   The dish . '. * iif>      ornamental one, the '.'.i..ry clusters being not of ''r.'i;�.'s, but it proved pal-. il, and if not very suhslan ; h > in �ou.-.idendile svay in tho i li'ome becau.e the center of rich :d every luxury of tho table, from wing locust iu bloom to tho os "St. John's bread" is said also to ies of wild locust, and there aro Id:.' I ' li..l. ��- nr:;;::\ Will': es "-lie h, the gn. ' trich. ;,bu a spi. V'lltci' methods of cooking in which they 'ntvo been used.   As for tho duiidelions. they am converted by tho skillful cook into the most palatable dishes,   'i'lioy f I aro also gnUieiwl with euro und made if into n healthful lea as well us into stewed if vegetables.'   The dandelion is sometimes f- termed not u flower, but it certainly is entitled and justly so to rlorul consideration, and belongs to the iloral family, BOMB EDIUI.K l'l.ANTti. 1 The nasturtium makes a most delightful aalad, the leaves being selected for the purpose as the most delicious portion. The jxtppury, peculiar taste tickles the taste of tlie epicure with its charms, and the nasturtium salad is a favorite dish on tbc bullet of the fastidious epicure. The seed of this flower makes a incut tempting pickle, and invite* by Its qualities an appetite tu the most juded palate and sUanaoh. l'he cactus in a plant that lias liecn used with effect by the Indians. When tbeSiOWt no IWiKdeflod tho govommout �nd wefp Jeft without, food or lipid, taW converted the cactus into u, nourishing vegotable. Beside* tliui, the liquid POtnW froiu them nerved iu the place of j Bomw bttve Klwfty* played an import- WfjaatUiaitl UUt Art of_OOOkillK. i A Clam Shell in the Ilen'a Throat. A Waldo county farmer, on goin; his hen house the other morning, saw one of bis favorite liens lying on her back, legB in the air and mouth wide open, with idl the appearance of being dead, but on examination found half clam shell stuck in her throat. He took the hen into the house, got a pair of pincers, pulled out the shell, and the hen camo back to life and laid an unusually big egg that day to show her gratitude, -Belfast Age. IMiiiitphorrecent Tnadalnole. Varieties of fungi, or toadstools, as they are popularly called, which give out light iu a dark place have been reported from Australia and other parts of the world. The api�earanco of this interesting growth, as seen in Brazil, isAle scribed by an EngliBh naturalist. One dark night, about the beginning of December, while passing along the streets, I observed some boys amusing themselves witli some luminous object, which I nt first supposed to be a kind of large firefly, but, on making inquiry found it to lie a beautiful phosphorescen fungus, ant1 was told that it grew ahund nntiy in the neighborhood, on the decay ing leaves of a dwarf palm.   Next day obtained a great many specimens, and found them to vary from one inch to tw inches and a half across. Tho whole plant gives out at night bright, phosphorescent light, of a pal greenish hue, similar to that emitted by the lurger firellies, or by the curious sof bodied marino animals. The light given out by a few of theso fungi, in a dark room, was miflicicnt to read by.-Yoiuh'; Companion. Wlieie rii'il Ou. The popular captain of Company G Twelfth Vermont- regiment, was strolling in the woods just out of camp one day during the war, when be eiune upon a inei:ibi'i' of his company sitting on thi: tump of a tree and looking us though lie had fought hi* laM light. "What' the matter. Hill?" said the captain. "Oli nothing," was the reply; "lain all right." You look as though you had a lit of homesickness." "No, sir," said Hill, with some resentment, "nothing of the sort Well, what aro you thinking about}" asked hisrjucHtioncr. "I was thinking said the Vermonter, "that I wished I was in my futher's barn!" "In your father's barn! What on earth would you do if you were in your father's barn':" The |>oor fellow uttered a long drawn sigh and said: "I'd go into the house mighty quick."-Salem Witch, lluuuer Iu Gliuuieii. Hy wearing too strong near sighted glasses continuously the nearsightedness may be very greatly increased and a diseased conditiou of the interior of the eye cmibcd, which may lead to very great ims of sight and even lotal blindness Then, in other cases, wearing an eyeglass may do very much harm, because wo frequently notice people with their eyeglasses tipped at various angles. In these coses that glass is acting as a prism, and is not doing thu work it should, but is causing " strain upon thu ucoomiuoda lion, which may be the starting point of a long series of nervous disorders. Again, the wearing of either eyeglasses or spectacles wit hunt rims may in some cases cause very annoying and injurious symptoms from tlie colors due to the prismatic uctiou of tho edgo of the glass. Medical Classics, A Ho/ Will Sliuw Ilia liel.t. (Schoolmasters of experience could, no doubt, tell of numerous cases of boys who have licen distinguished at school for nothing at all, except possibly general all round huduess, and who yet developed in later life into successful warriors, lawyers, clergymen, or author*. The usuul rule, however, seouas to bo that, if a boy is going to turn into u great uiau, hi* shows some signs of his fufuro iu lila early career. It is not necessary for tlicee indications to beiuuUautualt a youth endowed wiih thu exceptional physical vigor which is destined to carry kiiu to tho front, when lie attains mail's nutate way ue prominent at school simply fur lib athletic prowess,-l-ioudou Telegraph. Eighth street north Twenty-first, the second part utrctches from Twenty-livst to Thirty-third, and is the widely known "Tenderloin or Hoffman House dlstrist," and from Thirty third to I'ltrf'-mcond stretohes the "sou bretti-' parndo. There- is no other walk in this country to comiate with Broadway on a sunny day. It IwgiiiR tn fill up with shoppers as early as 11, but it is in the afternoon that it is at its brightest and best The shopping district is the least interesting to the men. The women who go there nre in n hurry. They aro preoccupied; they have, a mission to perform, They have heard that there is � place where they can get a piece of surah silk to match the stuff they bought last week at another place for fully throe cents a yard cheaper; and they are looking for I hat place. They take timo in their haste to look at each other, or rather at each other's garments. They also tako time to look ut what tboy themselves have on as they pass (he impromptu mirrors of the plate glass windows. If the reflection Is sluing one they will stop and walk tip to it, keeping up an appearance of deep Interest in what is displayed iu the shop window, but in reality seeing only their own pretty faces and bonnets. They are just as busy and earnest over their gloves and trimmings as aro their husbands and big brothers over their "puts" and "calls" down town. You see very few men in the shopping district. They leavo it to tho enjoyment of their feminine relatives and walk further up, From U to G o'clock the real promenade liegins on Broadway. It is a genu ine promenade, for the pedestrians are not there by accident; they walk there for the pleasure of walking and of seeing each other and Weing seen. Perhaps it would be more correct to say to be seen, and then incidentally to see others. You will see everybody who is anyi body on Broadway sometime if you wait long enough. But you will see very few of the swagger set, cither men or women They keep to Fifth avenue, and only strike Broadway where the avenuo crosses it. Broadway is only for tho less fashionable and perhaps less select citizens of Gotham. Tho women who are seen there are just a little too conspicuously dressed, and the men who saunter there stare at them more than is quite proper. This may be because all the actors and actresses in New York walk on Broadway in the afternoon, and the non-professionals are always on the lookout for them. They are frequently rewarded by the sight of .Sara Jewctt, who dresses overmuch on the etreet and looks, for some reason, shorter and broader than she does on the stage, and Pauline Hall in sealskin and diamonds, Cora Tinnie in black, with a black boa, and generally accompanied by her mother, who is said to be a real mother and not a hired "stage mother," and sweet Annie Russell, who sees no one, but keeps straight ahead with eyes "front." The men who haunt Broadway are as well known by sight as the Worth monument or the clock in front of the Fifth Avenue hotel, and they are quite as hardened to the curious glances of the pedestrians.-New York Evening Sun. ollctit Preparation. A young man well known in the city lately departed for Europe with the shortest notice on record. A few hours before the train left Buffalo that made connection with the steamer at New York he determined to join some friends on their European tour. He went home, told his family of his intention, and, of course, was met by the surprised queries: "How can you get ready? You have got to prepare for an ocean voyage. What are you going to do?" "Nothing, but black my boots," was the laconic reply. Who will assert that woman is superior to maa after such an incident?--Buffalo Express. nlTK-f* attention, nnn, on account ot rne scarcity at. rnin prevalent In that region, the fields wfre wnterod by canals led ic Trout mom and lakes. The people cultivated maiie, potatoes, and cotton, and hail quite an extensive commerce. The religious character of the ancient Peruvians Is an interesting study. They were much oiore developed In this respect than their southern neighbors, and while the worship of the snn seems to have bostt tho religion of tho people, their priests scoiii to have held the higher belief of a i�'rsoiml God, creator of the sun and other heavenly bodies. Human Racrlllcos were alniiwt unknown in Peru, and cannibalism is never found. Picture writing was used to a great extent, and a record of time was kept by a system of knotted strings. They had quite developed In poetry, and we have still some thirty or forty of their sxmgs, which were mainly upon their affections.-Philadelphia Ledger. LIGHT  AND  AIRY. Would Your Be Hand me! Wm It mj wrong? Ouitlitl torejoctiils lorsl Would Tout Did suah  rigid to hlui bekiagr I know bis lu'&rt Is stout ana true. Why did 1 evou dare to hums That be the daring dead would dot Kor could I At the timo express An angry protest. Bar, could rout He kissed mo. Henron hfdo the harm Our hearts lu Iota's triad meshes do. He leaned my head upon hit* arm. And 1-would you liaTQ kteseu him, tool -clilcairo Herald, Advance Sheets Unobtainable. "Papa, dear," said old man Tosty's eldoel daughter as suo bout fondly over lilm during his last illness, "forgive me for asking you, but what are you going to leavo your darling daughter when you diof "KatlierlossI" cried the irasclblo old gentle-roan as he rolled over with his face to tk( wall and kicked so bard that ho almost fractured the footboard.-Timo. '.'��� Dr. I,amerau*** BLOOD -HAND - NERVE Cures Indigestion, Liver Compf&ii Constlpa;ion of the Bowels, etti^? Periectly Sate and Reliable PJftfi live Medicine. Price, 50 centl(|�i bottle. *r WORLD'S CURE FOR PAIf| A never failing Remedy' (oma Aches and Pain.*, such as Rhedin tism, Neuralgia, Headache, To ache, Sprains, Biuises, etc. land Pharmacy, Agents. , The 1 supplied. m M  rf l misa ot' youraf Second Physician-Yes, ho paid me fifty doJJui-s on account yesterday. - Muusey'j Weekly. _ At the Club. Waiter (at the club)-There's a lady out-wdo who says that her husband promised to be homo early to-night. Ail (rihiug)-Kxcusemoa^omeut-Boston Budget. _ "Isove Uas a Beasou.*' IToad lover, well I know you're full of trouble; This la tho season when love proves a bubble. You tlud the summer maiden and the weather, By soum euuugtt magic, both grow cold together. -New York Sua, W. h. WID8LOW, Wwkgnaisatasd. 6, aonll Bait .trml Dan tin, Offlocfr lOOUl) BTSfi pnrsioLajra. 19 and 21 East Sherman Street,] Gv A. 8UPKA,*kJI. 1)., '  Dlsea.es of the Kjre, Bar, Nose? i Ihroat, Office No. 1. Norlti Main itreet. Seildsl Grace Church IteclDry. Office uoitra 9Jta lu:9tts. m.,ato4p. m. W. S.1 SIDUNGBH, Mtjslelan and Snifaon, OOesmtSlcainger'. drag store, OBu ptioaa, Hi residence M. DOES A GENERAL W. MoKIMNJSX Physician a&4 tture^on. Office oyer Do. SO, eontb Main ensst T. F. BUBBHTBOH, PhTBlolan and SorffeoM. Otass. rooms 8 and 8, orerpoetofltoe. J a.aULOOLM, Pbyafolen and Bure*eoB, (Honvaparhtc) Office, 118 let af  store. Bealdence No. 288 Fifth avenue west.    /" 0B PRINTING Book Making -AMD- ATTOBlf ajYft, rUTBLAW^eTHDMPIlKKY, Attorn (it. at law, Onto* orsr first National Bank.  Bctraace i Bherman street. ^THJTBStDB * OLSASON. .   .;� Attornwo nt Ianr, Office, noma 1, J, J, t, over No. 34 Booth Main 8> ^geOABTSTXT * WI8B. Attorney. �t lanr, tWos,Booms 10 and 11 Masonic Temple, ctnjj gar slain and Sherman. � glldUJ BHOABBS, lawyer. Office overHntNettonal|bank. h. nanam JJeWISfcFIBBC*, Attorneys at Law. ) HotchlMoa, Kansas. , Booms U sad II Ho  . KJikltnf, Coast/ A Koran.  and 4, tUdllnser block. r V. OLTMBB, A Sterner as law, OStes, eonthMaln nreet, near coort �TJSIO. MOt, a. H. OAKIS. 'twaakar of Piano, Organ, Violin, emtou Mneie stadia, room Mo. i'i. Hotel Bronrwl Second Avenoe asn  tut that of Mexico, about BOO years j>rior to the landing of Columbus, It i� uttribuled to jjtiualo, tha first JrVuvlao king of tht locas Uue, who es-tahlielied tho umpire on atirni busis. Ho connected the conntrj'by a numUor of atndght roads, of ten 100 InuWlii extent, ^nd all oonneoted with the eapitul. Aloiiij theso rood* were placed housas of rtipo** And �at#rWiiui(mt foy tb� Wn�> ow�erf,   4grioultujtj wslved A >'ow Verafou. Old Uothor nubborU, alio went to the cupboard, For boned for ber ilu# to looU, But wliuu eho got there. �ho found It quite bare} They'd ueon mlxod with tho hash oy the oook, _     - KxoUaaga. Uow.Uo Avoldui! SlarrlaKe. Tod-How is It you have kept from marry-Ing, bolug suob a ladiod' umnf Nod-By never Uiing iu lovo with lass than three gU-Ls at once.-Lifo. Tila Poat'. Couiollmens. Uorfaeo would stop a dock; Hut true, Kor 'lis a Iaco bo paasuu; fuir That evon tiw� uiust pauae to view The beauty thut'a Imprinted there. -MsvhaAjns. QuaUhea to Boar, Drummer (or riuurpus �& FlUtakla-MJgbty "fly" house that! "Ought to ba, Added  new whig aloot last ycar,'*-rW��' T^k ilaraid. ladeed She la. mankind Is twaa" i InjiHBsa "The nroHW fM/ �  �auoabl4 in Coubpatloo, ourlngand pre* renting fieaanoylugeoriuiaiut, while thersles ouinet ill disorder, cf tb.ui jioacb^arauWethe Bia  utaly tlis^wd�ess,do�e note^l here^ad tboss waOoaootrytBsmwUBao ihewUt^nUlsvala. able is M many w� th.t u�y wL'l aotEewU- n^MUs^Pr. Ourr^o^ll^P nSarter's UWe Urer nu. are very stanlM"* �a>| ssay tetaks.Ttaa or �� plU. roaJHSaC ttuji are ftrtf--- BCa^| MfVfSBl^ JmIA Jplfc MUk SPECIALTIES IN THE BOOK DEPARMIT, .uriials, Ledgers, Balance Books, Minor Abstract Books, Blank Books of all kinks, Land Examiner's Booka iau Registers, County Records, ' Manilla Copy Books, Ward Registration Books, White Paper Copy Books, Scale Books a specialty lal Estate Contract Books, Attorney's Collection Registers. SPECIALTIES II THE JOB DEPARMTEHT. fitter Heads, Packet Note Heads, Letter Note Heads, Commercial Note Heads, Small Posters, Large Postersand Bills, ay Statements, Bill Heads, all sizes, Statements, all sizes, Abstract Books, all sizes, Deeds, Mortgages, Leases, Etc ||afts, Bank Checks, Filing Cases, Deposit Checks, Counter Checks, Notary's Seals, Honker's Cases, Crushed Envelopes, Document Envelopes, County and City Warrant Books The above is only a partial list of the goods we car-rind the work we are prepared to execute promptly, are making a specialty of Magazine Book Binding] we bind Magazines and Law Books in all styles and || "west prices. We wish the public to understand that Wtare ready and prepared to execute any kind of Printing or Book Work! ptestookforms, but can make special forms to or4�V guarantee, all work and solicit patronage, MiiJIIOrderilReceiyeflPrompinAttention.  A44M ...  ... try-*       _     (    vt*r -4 >x:^f�'-*S^�>.' *V4*A' NEWS POINTING AND PAPE8 60., AtrK 48   

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