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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - April 3, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                � m al * T ill v T I sl?! it in i iw*w^mmmw i jid. i..........�i......mssfmammm AlWmmiS DAILY ffKWB: THlB8DAt MOHNttTO. APfcIL 8, iftOO. THEY WERE IRRES1STABLEI We advertised that last week prices on Dinnerware'would bet and our immense sales on the goods has proven the assertion to be true. This week we wi" I offer our LIMPS IT COST! Also give you an opportunity to buy Chamber sets at the fol lowing reductions: Decorated Chamber. Set*...........................* 2 81), reduced from f 8 Plain white 10 piece Chamber Beta. 3 00, 4 09, 4 85, B 75, 7 00, 7 88, 8 W. 10 1)0, 11 25, 1 25, 7 0 10 11 12 15 00 18 BO 3 35 Choice Seta will not last long at these pricee, ao make your purchasea before they are picked CTer. P. S.-We have recently increased our facilities so that we are now able to offer the wholesale trade some splendid drives.   Write us for quotations. INVENTORS' PRODUCTS. MODELS OF INGENUITY THAT TELL MANY SAD TALES. Memenloa ut ItrHln* to lit- Seen In � �>�>� Curloalty Simp-A tit omul it- Mm-hlne*, I'aln KlUem iinil Orpnn Attuclnnrnt*-('nfnrtu- On one n'deof tlio Kpucioii.t �''iirih utory oi Vho post office bulMiug art* wvt�r:il lar^tr r>>o�i.v Bet ujiart for tho um> "f tl�> clerks of the Unit'.-d ytat*� circuit court. A yrimblt: curiosity shop it is, ami tht�n> tbt> wTiiw recently spent an interesting- half tin)" �xamiuiiig, in company with Deputy ClTk flnul!-^', tint numerous cifiltvtiont*. I'ur then- niv >lorwl nearly all tbe models ami exhibits, tin' snN Joels of tnuuiiiorablt! patent i-mij�. iul.ju-lt-oated in Ihorircuit court siiw Us  -KiMi'-h-rwnit, nearly one htindmj y�':u> iv^>, TU� law providus Unit all tn>>il*-l- juiiI hiUls sliull l� kept in ih�- cn>i."!y o|' the clt;rk, mi loss they art' oiImtw i.->j disport of by order of tho court, and h�*iv, tiicrefori.' tbuy an*, with tlm excopiion ui a siuull pro portion wliicli bav� l>wr. si-nt to Wa^iiiiin tou, where an apprial iiua ln*.>n tnkrii from tho circuit court.'* iltM-iM-'i.. Some of the earlier inventions �r� ridiculously clumsy, fa-shiom^i to d '� of railroading. Yet oven them crude nmchiue, reveal in their s traction evidence that they are the parents o� tlio wonderful mechanisms of our day, and once in a while one is brought into court for the purpose of defeating a claim by showing that it anticipated all the claims of tho later invention. Here ore models over which litigation was hotf nU fierce fur yeui~s, arid which brought to the successful litigant wealth and riches and honor, and others, like the.u.itpruvsnieut in spindles for looms, which, had tho plain-tiffs been successful, would have brought to the latter millions of dollars in royalties. IlKJECTEI)      VICES. In a corner is a ponderous contrivance for tewing shoes with wire, which ouly requires the belt and pulley and the hand of the skilled workman to set it in motion, and it can do its work as handily as in the busy factory. Bide by side with this are the works of three or four parlor organs, which were used in a case which demonstrated that the tremolo attachment was a patentable invention, and although it is many years since the organs were placed here they give forth a creaking music as the foot moves the pedals and tha fingers press the keys. Near by are several little chairs for children, intended to l>e used as high chairs, or, by the operation of a lever, they can be converted into a, sort of perambulator. Standing upon u shelf near tho chairs is a time lock for safes, which is tlm subject of n suit commyucod many years i-liice, and -.till pending; tho works nutter the glass covering are still bright, and as tlio key was turned and the springs adjusted lliu tiny wliet-U sprang into motion and ticked away as though it wej-e but yesterday the work had been ilu- l fshed. ' J't.trt over this on a nht-lt, ilnngling from a bunch of dust covered paper*, is u set of iidhu teeth, brought into court for the purpose of establishing a claim to a puteitt on dental vulcanite. A huge pile of papers and printed lx>oks of depositions in one corner of the room relate to the claims of tho plaintiff in the once celebrated Woodbury patent planer case, which, hud the plaintiff won, would have been worth to him, It Is said, about 140,(100,000, but he lost the case. BOMK CUiUOUH INVENTIONS. Modern drees reform is recalled by a dusty package of women's undergarment*, which Laa lain undisturbed for how nearly a quarter of a century. Several large bottles of a greenish liquid bring to mind the fact that Isaac Adams established his right to the discovery of nickel plating and mode a fortune out of iL Several of the models evidence that the greatest tatout possessed by the "inventor" was cheek. Quo of these wanted pa ton ted an arrangement of die* for cutting leather soles, tho invention consisting simply in placing the dies side by side with tho bee) and toe alternating so that there wus tittle waste of materia). The court dismissed the invention for want of uovelty. Another person wished patented a somewhat similar arrangement of diojfbr cutting paper collars, but he failed. Still another sought to jKiteut u process for bronzing iron, which consisted merely in coating tho material with iinseed oil and baking it in an oven. It wus, strangely enough, successful in several of the inferior courts, but the supreme court of the United States decided against him, ami he celebrated the decisiou by blowing his brains out. One ingeuious muchino is to constructed that a hide thrown upou it is automatically measured and tbe number of square feet It contains is registered u|jqi. a dial, and the most singular /act about this invention it that two minds should have invented two such, maehiues as tbey are, iuteuded to do the same work, fend each so closely resembling tho other. It is a fact that great Incomes uuvu been derived /ram very hlmplo in volitions--for in-�t*uoe, *uoh as the combination of the spiral snfipK and a bird cage. Those two article* separately were familiar to everybody *nd iu gtmural use, but ouoday U enbered tbe mind of a fortunate man to ioia tbe two together; it "met a lung /oil woii^," Odd tbe courts decided (bat while nejtbes tbe uju-Lu^ nor the cage aloue was table, tbe combiuatiuu was, aud it fa etfjTri tbat tbe inventor reooivod from tbe in- many ywirsr n nor aurmg me entire iae ot the patent. Another simple ai'ticle, out of which much money was nuide, was the contrivance made by attaching a piece of brass or cteel, with a thin slot in the centiv, to a piece of elastic, the combination being used in holding up children's stockings,-Boston Glebe, UI lint Ail mln I ut ration In ItiiRHln. A certain oflicial, Iwasting of his power �it !i tho minister, made a wager that the umiohT would sign officially for him the Lord's Prayer. Ho wrote tho prayer out on an otlli'i:il pa|*T and inserteil it among number n| pajjers sent for tho inspection of the miriisii-r. In due ,timo it was ix'turned, duly signet 1 and sealwl with the great sea), proving incoutestably that the minister had never even glanced at the paper. The actual wording of the accusation against one youug man exiled to the wilds of Eastern Siberia was: "The nceused is suspected of an intention to cuuunii at some future indeterminate time an illegal act-'1-George Kcnnan's Lecture. It has been observed that the iriDaenaa epidemic in Sweden seemed more to follow the channels of communication than the atmospheric currents. Beginning in Stockholm, it followed the railway lines to the larger towns, afterwards spreading to smaller towns and country place*, and last of all reaching the isolated and remote 2?orrlaiid BIK1HDAY   CHARACTERS. If a girl inborn iu January she will be a prudent hou^wife, given to melancholy, but good tempered, and fund of tine clothes. In February, an affectionate wife and tender mother, aud devoted to dre^s. If iu March, a frivolous chatterbox, sometimes given to quarreling, and a connoisseur hi gowns and bounets. If iu April, inconstant, not very intelli gent, but likely to be good looking anil studious of fashion plate>. If in May, handsome, amiable, and given to style iu dress. If in June, impetuous, will marry early, lie frivolous, and like dressy clothes. If in July, possibly handsome, but with u sulky temper and a jwnchant for gay attire. If in August, amiable aud practical, likely to marry rJch and to dress strikingly. If in September, discreet, alfable, much liked and a fashionable dresser. If in October, pretty aud coquettish, and devoted to attractive garniture. If in November, liberal, kind, of a mil disposition, aud an admirer tf �r.ylish dre^s. If In December, well proportioned, fond of novelty, uiul extravagant and a student of dress effect.-Yenowine's News. TO  REDUCE  THEIR WEIGHT. Lillian Russell religiously avoids pustry and all food of a farinaceous nature. Fanny Davenport, the acinus, dieted herself and look lung walk* until she got thin. Mrs. Ogdeu Goelet is a great believer in vapor baths and btrict attention to her diet.. Mrs. \Y. K. Vauderbilt resorts to a Turk-jhh bath whenever she thinks she is gaining tlesh. Mrs. Henry Clews employs a trained nurse to give her a vigorous rubbing regularly three times a week. Miss Jeauno Turaure takes her walk every uiuruing immediately after rising, and also U very careful of what she eats. Stately Pauline Hall says there is nothing In tbu world like a live mile spin oo a bicycle to bring down a wumuu's flesh. Miss Cossfe Douglass, who is widely known as the Irish beauty, takes a three mile stroll every morning to aid her digestion and a Turkish bath three times a week. Imlk'llo Urquhart, of the New York Casino, practises every morning with Iudiuu clubs. HIio swings these aud al*o a pair of live pound dumb bells very well, and in this manner hardens her tlesh aud kee|hi her figure in pro|>er sua|>e.- Washington I'ost. Malcolm W. Ford Draws from His Own Experience. 80MK DETAILS OP  THfc  OA HE, Rales �r tho Ranntaft Urond Jump-Th* ImportMhoe ot th� "Tak* Off"-How to Knrlnwr Vow Stride - Tim fttanrilnt Jnmp- Jtimplnij with tTHBhtA. Tbe art of jumping to motrt people I* difficult to understand. Jumpers vary �> much in build that it In umlem to t*ay Ihnt a certain athlete can Bpriug well on account of having long legs, or that some other one can spring equally well bocause \\f> is short, strung and compactly built Gymnastic instructors oft*n theorize on this subject, but my experience has been that aby reason given for a certain athlete's excellence In jumping could he completely dispelled by analysing tho build cf some other pqunlly good jumper. Itisnafc to my that the secret of jumping Is none other than that attributed to nearly all ath-., letic games where activity is the predomtnat- | f iug feature. A wrestler before ho can bring about force sufficient to put his antagonist where he want* him muetconcentratecertaln muscles for an effort Juuipiug requires the same concentration, but it must Lte of quicker nctlon. There are many different kinds of leaping, but few men are good at more titan one or two Rtyles. The reason for this is that there is such a diversity oN action In the various jumping events, and few stylos of jumping will develop the muscles used in other styles. Broad jumping, which means clearing a distance, is the easiest to understand, although there nro fewer good performers at It than at high jumping. This Is because oShe dlffl cully in practicing hrund jumping, for b-,*-fore one can try, for instance, the running broad jump a level pluco, 75 or 100 feet long, tnuht bo found. High jumping needs only & space of 30 or 40 feet and can be practiced in a gymiiHAJum almost as well as out of doors. It is not so with broad jumping, for athlete to have confidence must land in soft dirt, mid even though there are gymnasiums with a clear space of 100 feet, u box of dirt for athletes to land in ten or fifteen feet long and n foot deep would take up too much space and bo too much of n general nuisance to justify its presence. It can readily be seen that when the facilities for prcoticlng high jumping are so much better than those given for clearing a distance, the latter game should have fewer good performers, even though it i* a simpler exercise. Broad jumping, however, is more of a test of a man's spring than hitfli jumping, for there is less science in it. Kunning broad jumping consists simply of an athlete running up to a mark on the ground and springing from ouo foot, landing iu soft dirt du� tip for the purpose so that there will bo no injury caused by a jat- from coining iu contact with hard ground. Tho athlete gauges liU run so that a certain foot will nl-ways lie at the takeoff, which is tho line from whero he springs. In this way the necvswiry mu&cles will bo developed in the leg* used to spring with: The only part in the jump that sbowB any gree of hcienct iu taking off properly, i'his means to get the foot on tho line whero the measurement is made properly, so that no distance will be lost by taking off or stepping i inarm Vrte JuRer mSianro" generally fun from'w) or 70 feet, mid get a certnin foot |nttHeirmark and IncroasB th^lr speed from that point, J. 8. Vnothocs, who formerly held th� IkwI American nmstfitir record at this gnmn of fp*\t 1% inches, couuncnerd running at a mark 80 foot 0 Itichc* a way from tbe take off. Ho leaped from his right foot, and wonld | start toeing the* HO foot mark. He ran to the takeoff with regular strides, measuring but 8 or 4 feet nt fintt, but near tho tako off roach-iug In the nelghtiorhood of 7 feet, lie was considered very good at tAktng off, and would lose no more distance by toeiiiR back nf tho line ihnn Is expet!ted of any good jumper. Vhe jump is measured from the; tako off, even though the athlete might toe a , foot back, so It Is to one's interest to get as Dr. Lameraux'8 clow to the edge as Is possible. When I made' acnp SnrflinR n.nicpq �tr MU tho pnwnt best amateur record of OS feet 8 ?Pra,ns' "C".;1�1 BLOOD -!UND - NERVE - Cures Indigestion, Liver Compl Constipation of the Bowels, eW Pertectty Safe and Reliable tive Medicine.  Price, 50 certW j bottle. ^ J WORLD'S CURE FOR PAlll _ A never failing Remedy' A*   - . . . ArtiM ot.H Pflitu such an Rh�itti ^>Ml*"�l"�*�'mt>M�*t�MMtWI^I I OMfttoWifW 0�� . _______ Aches and Pa �, sucn ' R*gfl�''�>   Brazil perforated stamps are worth #60. Five 1BW Cape of Oood Hope stamps art valued ut $200. Tbe im KuKtbth stamp, V. H. (black), with the lutters in the upper corners, will easily fetch $50 used attd $26 uuubed.-Loudon Globe. _ Do You Observe? itoui*b>'-I say, Qunto! heard the new schoine of Wanamuker'sf Uo dowu to thy postoIHce betwauu 13 aud 1 o'clock to-uiorrow aud you cau get thirteen two ceut stamp* fur a cent aud a quarter, UiuU>-You don't say so. I must lay iu � stock.  A cent aud a ijuurter, yuu say} Itumsby-Yes, a cent and a tpjurter. Ons uvttt aud twenty-nve cenU. Observe, van boy I Tat ^al-Cbutter, path. A ditch Is dug in front of tbe joist or on the side toward the direction the jump is mode. The rules say that this ditch shall be least 0 inches wide and 3 itidhesdeep. Its purpose is to prevent tho athlete from toeing over the line while jumping, for It can readily be Mjen that although one may encroach two rhree inches over the miniature precipice, any further getting forward would result in the foot slipping down iu the ditch while in the act of jumping, which of course would prevent e\eu an ordinary distance being leuivd. Tho place where the athlete laudd is dug up to the depth of nbout a foot. Its nearest edge to the lake off is about 14 feet aud its furthest edge 20 feet from the scratch line. The length of this trough all defends upon the cluKi of attdotes that use it. If an athlete jumps over 23 feet he should land In dirt dug up to a distance of 27 feet, so that there Is no possibility of his sliding as be lands in the soft dirt, and twiug stopped suddeuly against tbe burd ground. Accidents of this kind have happened which buve laid athletes on the Kheif for wine time with a sprained ankle or a strained tendon in a foot To explain the take off a little further, It may be mentioned that the reason of its present construction Is so that fouls can be easily judged. Tlie old custom was to have simply a whitewash line on the level path. If an athlete should toe over a quarter of un inch or so it would lie apt to cause a dispute. The suggestion of a ditch marking the scratch line would of course be considered Impracticable unless a square edge could lw maintained. Therefore u l>oard is sunk. AU jumps are measured from the edge of this board, which is also the edge of the precipice. If nu athlete touches tbe ground in front of this ditch it Is a foul, uud nx the excavation is 0 Inches wide no one can touch the ground without gutting almost the >vh<.!  foot in front of the take off on to the flat ground nven in front of the ditch, aud of course any judge would uolice that The joist is Hpecilled to be 0 Inches wide, because that dlutuiice is unllcieut to cover the bull of tho foot, if the board were wider it would interfere with the splken io the jumper's htel. A grout muuy athletes, when they llrst try a runniug bruud jump with spike shoes, show timidity in running up to lhu arwwh murk aud placing tbulr foot ou the board ou account of the feeling thut the spikes will stick la the wood aud throw them.  A few trials I BiiOQuraged I*!' at it, however, remove all fear iu this re- tUfflnald-You have so many suitors, Ml�� gard.  Another disagreeable feeling expori- Daisy, tbftt It almost deters uie from calling land Pharmacy, Agents. ^TheVtfa supplied. Oollft, CtautlK' wm� �     HL A. AM***, M.D,       I ^J^JZ*        �**JP' *"a * Ttt Gnrutm Oovnurr, 77 Murrvr Htreet, N. T. PROFESSIONAL CARDS, L. WIM8LOW, WnkgunnlMd. Olio*, It PBT8IOIAIW. The News PrintiDg & Paner Co., 19 and 21 East Sherman Street,1 a. suffa.'.m. D., DI.rau.orth. Kje, Ear, Koii.'M Ihnwt. �>� Offlce No, 1. North Main .treat. H�kflpi OtKf Church HecloTj. Offlce hoar. �,to 10!� m.,Sto4p. m. W g H. BIDLIKOSB, |v 'Phy�lolu mntl BnrsMMi    Pi;-.' OflMmiBIdUnRm'. Urng .tore. OUm DOES A GENERAL W. MaKINNKX Dffic or.r Mo. 90, .oatli Hain T. P. ROBERTSON, PhfiloUn and Bu|Ml, (Mm, room. Iwtl, oTMpoafciiacs. ' J �. MALOOLX, (Hotapathlc.) one*, 111 l�t it�M     , A. X. HUTCHINSON, M. D., Homeopathic phyalelan and Btugaiai ad BpaelaUat In rectal dlMant. Pl>*  Balance Books, Minor Abstract Books, Blank Books of all kinks, Land Examiner's Books Loan Registers, County Records, Manilla Copy Books, Ward Registration Books, White Paper Copy Books, Scale Books a specialty Real Estate Contract Books, Attorney's Collection Registers.; 4>1 J J V. OLTMAR, Attoraar at Law. OaW, aoulh Main atrwat, aau coirt ansae. paw. O. H. OAKH. SPECIALTIES IK THE JOB DEPUMTEIT. atuie ..SSITOaffiK Lettw Heads, Packet Note Heads, Second Av-raoa ami. AKCHITBOTt. D. T. DKl'RY, btandino bboap jump. (From au inatantaneoufl photograph.] grouad. Wlicu in the act of Bjiriiiglcj the atlilete will etnrt with bla arma at the aide and throw thuni up quickly, at the same time contracting the luutulea of liis log". The upward movement of the arms help* to propel the Ixxly. TlitTo ia absolutely nothing to learn in tun jump and an u lost of a man's .priii; It Ik considered unsurpusbod. Men who do not take part in utlilutio exer-cL*?, in Msulliig a jumping dlnpuU), will generally chouse lite atandlng broad jump on account of their knowing how to .do It. Jumping willi weighta i� an cxcvllenc all rountl exercjw. for not only the lug� but the arm. are developed, but aiuateure seldom uae tltla style, and have competition* decided without artificial old of any kind. Malcolm w. Fobs. Room B Vlret National Bank bnUdlnK, llaicl lnaon, lianaaa. T Fa*- GARTNUK, Architect, bnUdlng, Hatcbinaon, Kanaaa. Letter Note Heads, Commercial Note Heads, Small Posters, Large Postersand Bills.; Pony Statements, Bill Heads, all sizes, Statements, all sizes, Abstract Books, all sizes, Deeds, Mortgages, Leases, Etc Drafts, Bank Checks, Filing Cases, Deposit Checks, Counter Checks, Notary') aJ pATBNTfl. j Lathy & Baldbbson,      i\ -Solicitora of- kr ^ZL^^^^M* Cases, Crushed Envelopes, Kanaaa Cltjr, Mo, Sand Stamp for Oui Book,    ' .        ,      =ar County and Cily 'Warrant Books Document Envelopes, JtatAlnir Venture, laoming U�ve. Ear �yea aay ^ea,'* yet her llpa aay "uoi" 1 really tUlui I will dare it. The khw thut la atohm la >��W, and though Her eyes any "yea," yet bur Hps aay "no," And If .he be vexed with me, let it be ao; For the aake of the prize 1 can bear It. Hot eye. aay "yea," yet her Una aay "uo{" I really think 1 wiU don It. -V. U. 11. InSt. r-oulEya, auoed by novice* it cuund by Uio liability of the foot going over too tar, alipping down la the ditch brluglug about a wrenched uiujole or teudon. Acoideula ot thl. kind are lre-ijuent, aud only af tin' ooiiaiderable practice oap ai) athlete ruu up to the take off with full force and feel sure of not going over boo far. The method uiaid Uj moat athlete* Iu atrlk-lng the take off ryoj.tfly U luuiarkolT at aowe iUaUn.ce ba'+ a live on the paOi and atari! running from t|i�t poiut, utlng a fairly regular atrlde whlo>i brluga them to the take oil with to* proper (out Borne have their niarka 100 or 1S6 feet away from tho take off, while other* will have ou Indicator wlthlu 80 ar.sUaat.ot the takeeB. 'liiuan wlio hava upou you. However, I think I (hall com* Wednesday evening-if you give ma a little epoouragemenU laiw Dal*y (Impultlroly)-Indeed I will, Beglnajdl Ckime early tud avoid the ruth.-. Onse a yfvtli.    _ , A Oaud)d OUI. . fiayaaTOUjredpaatthe'caiitlyahop �' With tempting OaintlMtpreKdi Mba toeked unutteratikt thuiga, IkMuotawurdabeaaid. ,;J|� Ana- luaoaah rj|ght Uwc and then. Aud boujbt a pound-that man dldf He aeukl ret uae her nothing when Bar waoaar wa. to uawllad. > Rnffalft Qaurfav. CURE Sick UauUchf tvid njliov� �ii tl4 ttoablaa luoV dent to * hlilou* �tat� ol the *f*i*w, luob ee etlnf, Vein In (tut Bide, *o, WUU� tbtdr moitl fa-waiienlfl attoowae tuw been ebovn looarius SICK Htaaaoha, vat Oarter'a Little Uver Mil. are eaaell7  Vaola. i!r>� U tote; only HEAD Ana* the? wctdd bo almcatprloaUiato thoe* who -------^'lttluaotetraaamgpoJl*UaJntjhatt^rta*'' ' leaadoeano'" "------------ HdrfOodneaadoeanote'^lhera,aBdtho*t ___,_.J>ftbomni;i and thaaa little plllarala. ablalniwainy w�v�UiatUier will not be nil. a^totewltaovttW. 3ut after all atakoaad tlllk*l�*Vet- ao many Uvea '.feet hcu to wtare wfgkT.w^boaat Ovnilbiva^ltwSii.: *0�3art^Uftlf Uver ttllaa�evary ataall tnd ' ^taaptewW. Oueo�twopUlauia>�a,iI IVr aatlbiaV,! ttaatabla.aud doao* grli The above is only a partial list of the goods we oar* ry and the work we are prepared to execute promptly. We are making a specialty of Magazine Book Binding/ and we bind Magazines and Law Books in all styles ajw|| at lowest prices. We wish the public to understand thft^l we are ready and prepared to execute any land of Printing or Book Work! Have stock forms, but can make special forms to Qrt$$*\ We guarantee all work and solicit patronage, ^ /Ad NEWS PRINTING AND PAPER 111 81 8   

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