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   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - March 26, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                HUTCHINSON DAILY NKW8: WEDNESDAY MOBNIN6, MARCH 26,1890. THEY WERE IR RES IS TA BLE! We advertised that last week's prices on> Dinnerware would be, and our immense sales on the goods has proven the 'assertion to be true. This week we will offer our LIMPS AT COST! Also give you an opportunity to buy Chamber sets at the following reductions: Plain white 10 piece Chamber Beta.................    2 25| Choice Seta will not last long at these prices, so make your purchases before they are picked oyer. YOUNG'S CHINA HALL P. S.-We have recently increased our facilities so that we are now able to offer the wholesale trade some splendid drives.  Write us for quotations. 2 SB, reduced from %	8 50 8 00,          "	5 25 4 00,	5 50 4 85,	7 50 5 75,	!l 00 ^ oo,	10 50 7 08,	11 60 8 50,           "	12 60 10 �0,	15 00 14 25,           "	13 50 2 25,           "	3 25 ROMANCE AND INSURANCE. A PLOT TO SECURE $10,000 THAT WAS  FINALLY  EXPOSEO. LUCIA ZARATE. A   Tltljr Woman   Who Wmi  I'nme urn a MlilrrL. Lucia Zurnte, Ibe iniilgct, who iliod recently of gastrin fovr-r, wom one of tin* most wonderful freaks the world linn over Unowu. Site was tbo Klnallust wonmu in existence. Hot father ami mother were Ixttli above the average height. ' Tito former weighed 105 pounds, the latter 200. Lucia was born in Vera Crux, Mexico, on Jan. '.J, IWxI. At her birth she weighed three-quarters of a jioiukI and measured nine inches in length, iter mo- IVilllam Davldge Since 1830," in scrap noes, form. There are 1,099 different Voles recorded. Ho made an entry in Itis diary at the termination of each trip of tho number of miles traveled, it foots up 100.SSO miles In the same diary Is a memorandum of each letter sent. The postage account ligcregates 0,019.00. � Unqualified. LUOIA ZAHATC ther being obliged ta nurse her in one hand, .and was unable to maite her clothes smalt enough to fit her uutil shu was 12 months old. When she was ouo year uld she bad . :a*rowu three inches, and ouutmued to grow until she was 8 years of age aud had attained a height of twenty-six inches.   Then shs stopped growing. At the time of her death she weighed but four und throe-quarter pounds, and never at any time weighed over five pounds.  Her face was bright and Intelligent, but an enormous nose rather marred its beauty.   Her eyes were like two little black beads and very pierclug. Her body wus as fully developed as any Foniau's of her age could he; in fact, she was a porfect woman on a very small scale. She spoke four languages with ease, could talk intelligently on a variety of subjects, aud insisted upon being treated as a woman. At the time of her death she was malting SOU a n oek clear. Lucia appeared before all the royal house* of Europe, and accepted her homage from the crowned heads with that ease aud repose of manner which comes so natural to an American born woman. Clipper (the Jockey)-Sorry, boss, but I can't ride today. Owner-Sick I Clipper-No, sir; but I was .swipin' appl , �4, 28. Delicacy of Plana*. The other duy I saw a piano that had been returned from l city nearly 800 miles away because "something rattled In it," and the dealer, who had spent three duyu in trying to find the cause of the difficulty-finally attributing it to a defect in tho sounding board-returned it. Now there was nothing wrong about the sounding board, and tho piuno in good condition, but had been hurriedly shipped, and a screw in the swing desk attachment was not firmly imbedded.  This caused the rattle. Now it is just this kind of a trivial oversight that causes more than 50 per cent, of the trouble known as rattling I remember ubout two months ago in a place in Baltimore an upright piano had to be taken buck and taken apart aud a day spent over it to stop Buch a disturbance, which was caused by nothing more than a email piece of shaving about quarter of an inch long that got in under the pressure bar. It could not be seen and to find it cost a lot of mouey.-Musi cal Courier.__ Ualueky Thirteen. From tho fact af Christ's betrayal by Judas the latter is supposed to have been the original of tho unlucky thirteenth who brings disaster ujkhi a fcust. This superstition is very general, ami so strong bus it been in France in particular that in Paris there existed years ago, and may I The barber was discharged and he took very possibly now, a class of professional | the stand.  His identification was in- The Secret of rturm' Reappearance After He lln.t Keen Mourned Kor by Ills ties* Olrl The Doctor and Matilda Overshoot the Mark Attout eight years ago a man living in Pecfttonk'n, His,, who may bo called Burns for short, insured his life in the Provident Savings Life Assurance company of New York for $6,000. He made the policy payable to a yqung lady for whom he had developed a singular degree of fondness, but had never married. Shortly afterward ho took out an additional $4,000 policy in another company, and proceeded thereafter about his regular business. He was in good health, and one day in December ho went to tho river for a season of skating, declining any company. He .went skimming over the smooth surface of the river till he reached a point three miles from town, where he passed a group of men loading wood, shouted a greeting to them, and passed out of sight. They recognized him, and remarked on his grace as a skater, but they never saw him again. A CLEAR CASK. Burns never came back to town. His Pecatonica friends never saw him again and his loss was mourned bitterly. In a day or twoa groupof boyB catneupfrom tho country along the river, four miles from town, and said they saw a man whoso description answered that of Burns come skating toward them the moruing of itis disappearance while they were attending to some muskrat traps; that he was performing some marvelous gyrations nnd that ho suddenly disappeared in an opening In the ice. Burns* friends found tho marks of his skates from the very point where he bad put them on down to within 200 yards of where the youthful trappers had treed a muskrat Here they found a hole about ten feet across, formed by a spring, which prevented tho water from freezing. The skulo marks led to the very edge of the hole, nnd there were lost.    , It looked like accidental death, and Miss Matilda, the charming beneficiary under the policies of life insurance, asked that the money be paid her. But until the body was produced and ideutiilcatiou fixed beyond a doubt the soulless corporation declined to contribute. Along in April tile ice' was well out of the river, nnd the IkhI was dragged for the body of Burns. The body of a man was found some distance down the river. He had on Burns' clothes. Burns' skates -were on his feet, and iu one of the pockets was found Bums' open faced watch. The identification seemed complete. But cliief among those who examined and identified the body was Dr. Pills, who had passed upon Burns' application for insurance. He seemed exceedingly interested in tile case, making many trips to Pecatonica and comforting Matilda by almost daily visits. He cheered her so effectually that on the Fourth of July they were married, and tl(e girl laid aside her weeds the day she was wed, For some' reason the company still objected to paying the insurance money, and suit was brought to compel them. They found Burns hod made a will by which the doctor inherited all his little worldly wealth, and this, with some other facts, still induced Uicm to question the validity of the claim. The case did not come to trial until the following winter, and then the defendants' attorney asked for an adjournment until the following day. Was he going to offer a compromise? Next morning the court room was filled aDd every one was on tiptoe to see how much of the $10,000 Matilda secured. Bill Evans, a barber, waa placed in the witness chair by the defense. Were  you acquainted   with   John Burns?" he-was asked. "I was," he replied. "Is he living?' � "He is." "How do you know?" "Because I am looking right at him now!" WHY EUttSS TOEJiED UP. All eyes followed the barber's keen glance. Judge, jury, lawyers, witnesses, everyboy rose up and gazed iu horrified interest ut an apparition near the door. There stood John Bums sound and welL PURJL FUVDRltf EXTRACTC Peea 1,y the Catted States Government KnAorwa by the heads of tie GmtlTnlveWttite jart Fnbl'r t-'ood Analysts, as the StronnsL Purest and most Healthful. Pt. Price's Cre�i Baking Powder does noteontaln / mmonla, Lime or Alam. Dr. Price's Sellclmis Flavoring Jt�-racts, Vanilla, Lemon, Orange, Almond. Rosa, etc., do aot contain po&ODotis On* or Chemicals PRICE BAKING POWDKR CO..  Haw York.  Ch'.oatm.   m. iMitlm. diners out called Quulorziemes, whose business it was to be always prepared with a dress suit handy for summons to take the pluco of some recreant guests, and thus prevent un assemblage of the unlucky thirteen. In regard to.tho organization of "Thirteen Clubs" it may be observed that this superstition has never been considered to hold good except where the number thirteen has occurred ace dentally. The absurdity, therefore, of the formation of special clubs to meet on the 18th, to dino at 13 tables or to do anything else with 18 in it, becomes at once obvious. Such institutions do not fill the bill.-New York Herald White-la, IS*, S3, 27^81. Black to play and draw. BOLUTlOflg. Qaeckor problem No. 50-By J. Fyfet Blaok-S*, 6, 11*. White-13, U, 18. Block to play and win. Block. 1.. a to 7 6 to 18 8..18tol7 i.. 17 to m 6..vatoai 0.. 7 to 8 1.. SO to 81 8.. 81 to M �,801o88 10. .88 to 10 ll..lBtol5 ...... to Iff ia..,}?wio i.;:tifc ? �.. I tolt It.. 8to 7 17..H tol8 Vt.. 18 to U   . Gk^urofaJeia No. Mi I'.' White. 1..14 to 0 3.. 18 to 14 8..14 to V 4.. 8 to S 6.. 6 to � 0.. 8 to 8 7.. 0 to 10 8.. 10 to 14 0..14 to 10 10..10tol4 11. ,14 to 8 U.. 0 to 6 18.. 6 to 1 14.. I to 10 IB.. 4 to 8 10.. 8 to 4 17.. 4 to 8 Bwlus. Block. I,. 1C moves tt.-Pmat** Ait A�4W* tm�f Mao*. Flowers Iu Cairo. The famous bouquetleres (women bouquet makers) of Paris begin their training in the florists' shops by the arrangement of bridal bouquets, and after that they learn the mingling of colors. Paris cluimsto be tho home of flowers. They grow in the gardens of its surrounding countryside^-tho orchids ut Chatillon, thu roses ut Montrougoor Fontcnay, hyacinths at Boulogne and lilacs at Neuilly. The miuiosn, the tea rose aud some of the commoner flowers oouio from the south iu quantities. Tho costlier flowers are reared in Paris and its environs, and as a rule, are bought und worn there. Tho l'arisieiuie must have flowers In her box at the theatre, iu her drawing room, oil I lie muif, ill her huir, in the bodino of her dress and iu her attic window, Philadelphia ledger. A Itemed? for Uurni. The celebrated German remedy for burns comusta of IS ounces of tho best white gluo broken into email pieces iu 8 pints of water und allowed, to become soft. Then dissolve it by mean* of �[ water bath and odd Bounces of glycerine and 0 drachms of carbolic acid; continue the beat until thorously dissolved. On oooling this hardens fo ar. elastic maps covered with a ibtniug, parchment like skill, aud iuay be'kept for any length of time. When required for'uM it is placed' tor a few minutes in a wider bath'until1 sufficiently liquid aud applied by mean)-' of a broad brush, it forjus in about two nuoutea u shining, smooth, flexible aud nearly transparent skiu,-New Orleans Ptoayuna. stantaneous, complete, unquestioned. Even Matilda broke down and wept, though something more than joy ut seeing him may have moved her. Tho doctor grew white and red and white again, then fainted outright Burns told his story. He and tho girl and the doctor formed the scheme td get $10,000 from the insurance companies. He was young and careless, and willing to take some risks. The doctor was to take $2,000, the girl $8,000, and he was to have the balance. Then he was to marry Matilda, and with her leave the country. He passed the wood uaulen on the ice, and almost immediately after took otf his skates, went ashore and �truck off through the woods, which were bare of snow, and got u train at a station ten miles from houie, and went to Chicago. -Then he went up to Wisconsin and found work in a sawmill. He corresponded with the doctor, taking an assumed name. When the company demanded tho body the doctor wrote asking for his skates, watch and the clothes he wore on that fatal morning. He sent them, but saved the letter, which was now produced in court, and in which tho statement was made: "I have a good stiff about your size which I can use." Burns accidentally learned that Dr. Pills and Matilda were married, and he ut once returned to Pecatonica. He said that hu would not have cared if his girl hadn't married, but iter weakness and the doctor'* evident treachery led them to overreach. The sequel waa that toe doctor spent two years in prison for his share in the fraud. Burns got off lighter, and the woman was not prosecuted. But bow about the man whom the boys ai.w akate into a sink hole iu the river? ' Well, they simply lied.--Chicago Herald.       . The Peoples State Bank. Capital Stock $100,000. Southeast Cor. Main [and Sherman: Sts., Butchinp General Banking Business in all Branches Interest Paid on Time Deposits. I. I. BANDY, Freelunl. >. WILCOX, Vice-FrealduL r.n GHBisitA.it, Cashier JOHN CHAP* AH, Aes't Uft4l.lt A. J. Ldbx, President,      Foabx Vibcist, Vice-Fret.     0. H. Msnu, Cathie HUTCHINSON NATIONAL BANK! HUTOHIHBOS, KANSAS. OX.13EST NATIONAL BANK DST PrUTOmNSO* Orsanlawd Jan* IS, 1884- Capital 8tock Paid Strain* MSrOO&QO. up,      $60,000.00 AaUorlied Capital, WHtftOOM). fill do a General Banking Buiiacaa. Boy and Mil Domestic and Foreign Bx ahaafe. Oollactiofli promptly made and remitted for on date of payment, Z>rEUBK7X
                            

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