Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Hutchinson News: Wednesday, March 5, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Hutchinson News (Newspaper) - March 5, 1890, Hutchinson, Kansas                                flUTCHDTSON DAILY NEWS: WEDNESDAY M0BNIN6, MABCH 6,1890 Style "A" Single Door-Closed. Peerless'Ice Chest. Style 'C*-Double Doors. Our Style "D"-Side Board- Attached to either Style "B" or Style "C" Kefrlerator. Style "E"-Side Board. The PEERLESS Eefrigerator The MANUFACTURED BYI hinson Manufacturing Company HUTCHINSON, KANSAS. -A. CARD. We herewith show_you a few styles of our Refrigerators, and this advertisement will continue but for a short time, it will be well for you tp"make a note of this after reading, so that if you are not ready to purchase at once you will remember us when you are ready to look into the merits of the Peerless. You are well aware that it costs money to make honest goods, ard as long as the Hutchinson Manufacturing Company make Refrigerators they will be made that way, and if in course of time we find that our business is not appreciated we will discontinue to manufacture them, as we propose to make the best or none. So far our sales have been beyond our expectations, so much so that we are making a larger number now than at any previous time. Yoa will hear this Patent Refrigerator spoken of, and that with removeable lining, etc., so as to be cleaned. Use common sense in constructing a Refrigerator, get a pure air circulation and let the impurieties be carried off in the wastewater, and you will not have to keep your Refrigerator in the back alley? for fear that people will conclude on coming in the house that you have started a tannery on your premises. We have made several improvements to our Refrigerator this year, and expect to do so from time to time, as we feel confident that they are second to none, and for the benefit of some of our competitors making claims we still have confidence to offer the following on the Peerless: We will donate any charitable institution I50.00 if there is a better Refrigerator than the PEERLESS in the market to-day, and $50.00 to the party who can produce it. The qualities to be based on the economical use of ice, cleanliness and the preserving qualities of whatever is placed in^the provision chnmber.  As mouey talks it is useless to say more.  Yours truly,* COMPANY. Style" A '-Single Door. Style "B"-Double Doors. CHOCTAW  LEGENDS. Result of nn Interview with Chief IViet I'iH'lilj 1111. [Spi'i'Iiil CurrcspoiiilL'iii'e.l Kansas City, Fvb. lit.-In a rcwoul talk with tin- Chor.luw cliiuf, Volt-r Pilohlynn, hu tulil me of u wry curious k'^nid in ri'lation to the origin ot a subdivision of his trilii- known as tlie "Crawtish," or CraytiHli band: "Our peoj>li; have anions them a band who formurly-but at. a wry remote period of ar.tiijiiity, lonj; before the separation into C'reelcs (or Mus-Ru';ciA) .SrlJlinuk'H, CboelawH, eto.-had their abode ill ihe earth, under the mini and tsoft plaeei, near the rivers and streams, out of which they sometimes eoine and bask in the sunshine. They were more li'.ie a lolister or craytieh than human beings, and walked on 'all fours,' or rather on their claw*. "Their principal piaen of residence was a ^I'eaL lime.-,toue cave, far down in the bowels .if the earlh, where there was no liejit, noshing bat cimnierian darkness, and they had no lau^iia^e, nor could they undor.itaud a word thai was spoken to them. "The entrance to this cave was possible, only by wi^livvj; down through Uui urud, and they used to scamper away the moment they wero seen, so that the Ciioctuwa were, for many generations unable to i;et near Ilium, although thoy would lay in wait for them lor uioiitlm. "One day, however, a number of Ihem K'ui'u surprised bo suddenly that tlmy did not lmvo timo to go their usual route- through llio luuil-into their cave, but wero forced into it by a secret opening they had in the rocks! "The. Choctaw* then attempted to Binoke them out, und at lust, by persistent ellorl, succeeded. Thoy treated them kindly, taught llieni to talk Choctaw, to walk erect, made tliuin cut off thoir toe nails and pull out the hair from their bodies. After which they adopted thorn into the tribe, but the majority of them are still under ground!'' � Bull playing seema to bo common among all tribes, but it is conceded that the, Chucluws, in their primilivencss, wero tho most skilled in this game. Of counse.it is nut at nil similar to tho American national game in any particular, and is played with two baU or sticks. These sticks are bent into an oval loop ut otui end, with 11 web of Hue buck-skin thongs stretched across them to prevent tho ball from falling out when caught or tossed. One of these huts it held in each hand, and the players cuteh tho ball by jumping into the air, uud throw it from tin bats, never allowed to strike it or catch il with their hands. In every house 1 vIwuhI I uuw onu or more puiru of these peculiar bats, according Ui tho number of main residents. In tho primitive iluys of these people, it wits un invariable law of the game that no player should wear uioccusisii Oil Mb tout, and appeur only with the prescribed dress; that is, in his "breech-Clout/' 0 beautiful head belt, aud tull made of w.'iiu.' tiortJ hair or quill*, and � mane around Ms neck constructed of Ute aaiuu jhhutIhI a* �Ue tail, dyed in Ttw muteh was twuuU; mwl* up mootlm Utorv do day agrwd upon, and fed by two ohamplou*, or capbtin*, m mm timid mU tivm ?km bw ow>- tains bad the power to go through the tribe, from village to village, and alternately choose tho men for their re Kpeetivo sides. This choico of players was elfcetcd generally by proxy; two runners were sent armed with a pair o( "baU sticks," elaborately ornamented with paint, ribbons and other gewgaw.s. which, touched )iy the players selected was an evidence that thoy accepted, aud would lie on baud at tho time specified and prepared to take part. Kach set of players erected on the ground w here the game was to take place two upright poles about thirty feel high and six feet apart, across (lie top of which another pole was fastened. The.-.o goals, or "byes," as they wero called, wen. some eight hundred feet apart; at 1 point jusi half way between those goal was driven a small stake, wliero the ball was to be thrown into tho air at a givei signal, usually tho firing of a gun. All these preliminaries were arranged by old men, who were the judges or um piles of tlie game; they drew a lim from one ;',o;il to the other, across whicl all the betting w;rs mado and placed in the poas^-sr.iou of "slake holders" the night before the game commenced. Everything conceivable that wigwam oi tiuld possessed was slaked, and principally by tho women of tho tribe as bettors. t On that night, too, all tho players assembled around their respective "byes, where, under the glow of torches, the beating of "tom-toms" und tho songs of the Bijuaws, thoy for moro than a quarter of un hour indulged in tho picturesque "Ball-Play dunce," in their proper dress, and rattling their sticks together, all tho lima chanting us loud us they could. Meanwhile tho women who had slaked thoir goodB formed themselves in two rows oil tho "lino" between tho respective players und also danced, joining in musical appeals to tho "Great Spirit" to decido tho game in favor of their side. At the small stake, from which the hull was to bo thrown ut the opening of tho game on tho morrow, four old "medicine men," who wero to perform tho act of "throwing tho bull," were busily puffing at their pipes, smoking to the "Grout Spirit" for Bueeoas in impartially judging the game, us their duties of umpires demanded. Bomutimes seven or eight hundred players look purl in the game, and when the contest commenced u terrible struggle ensued to catch tho ball on their sticks uud throw it home between their respective stakes, which counted one. When thid happened there was a short halt; then the ball was started again by the judges, and whichever side in that auinuer counted a huudred won. UlWUV IN1U-N, A watch factory in Philadelphia has us astuyer bf metals a young lady. She took u four years' course lu chemiitry at the University of Pennsylvania, EXTRACTED HONEY. Mm KMpIng K�alutloulM>4 by tbe Mar-Ma Conb Hln end Kilracter. Ill � prim essay written by W, T, F, Petty for The American Bee Journal 00-ount tbe following atatunuut concerning extracted honey which eon bard)/ fail la t� oi lotaratt butuivvtf*. Extracted Tioney is honey' In its purest condition, exactly as gathered and ri^: ened by tho bees, without the admixture of any foreign matter. In this latter particular it differs from the strained honey of a few years ago, which was obtained by crushing the combs. By means of tho movable comb hive and the extractor bee keeping has been revolutionized. The application of these inventions to tho production of extracted honey, though differing in some minor details with different apiarists, is about tis follows: Tho bees are obliged to build their combs in inovablo frames, which may bo removed from the bivo without injury to combs or bees. These combs, when filled w-it,li honey and sealed over by tho bees, are taken from the hive, the adhering bees brushed oil' and the combs taken to tho extracting room. For this room the necessary applianees.ire an extractor, an uncapping knife, uncapping table, can for pouring the newly extracted honey into, aud, lastly, the receptacles in which it is to bo placed upon the market. The frame of comb to bo extracted is taken by the operator, the upper end being held by his left hand, while the lower end rests on the uncapping table; witli thouncapping knife in his right hand, he begins at the lower end of the comb and cuts oil tho cuppings of tho sealed cells, leaving tho honey exposed. Tile cap-pings thuscutoff drop in ton sieve, which is beneath the center of the uncapping table. The top of this table should be covered with tin and made to drain into the sieve, under which is a vessel for catching the drippings. The comb, being uncap|>ed on both sides, is placed into the extractor, which is u machine for separating tho honey from the comb by means of centrifugal force. This force aud its mode of action are best illustrated by tuking tho familiar case of tho grindstone. The honey extractor is so constructed that the forco, which causes tho drops of water to fly from tho stone-in tho case of tbe grindstone-causes the liquid honey, in tho case of tho extractor, to to bo thrown from the cells of lliocombs. As commonly made, tho extractor is a large can iu which is a revolving basket, or frame, made of course wire olotli, the axis of revolution being vertical. This axis is so geared with cog wheels that for each revolution of a crunk,turned by the hand,tho basket will muko ubout live revolutions. Concrete Flour* for Stable*. With a coucreUi floor in a basement where horses or cows are stabled nil the liquid inanuro muy bo easily saved. Tho lloor under the animals may bo made of plua or hemlock plank, matohed und grooved, and Inclining toward thu gutter in the rear. The cement should be the itosendule grade on a groundwork of gravel where drainage is provided, and this overlaid by the best Portland cement for additional hardness. If a cement floor is to last long it must be protected from severo freoziug. rjued by tie United fitatM GoronHncnt Hr.doMsd by the hesdnot t!.o Great Un verfllu-r md Public Food Analyam, an tho StronRiwt, Puree! and nmut nealthful. Jlr. Prld. s  ui be e�w �/bat tt* beK aad ike The Peoples State Bank. Capital Stock $100,000. Boutbeaat Cor. Main and Sherman' Sta, Hutchins General Banking Business in all Branches. Interest Paid on Time Deposits. ���I JejrpSJPPjI^PP TFf^e^ylfl^SjBS^P . � � HENEY HEGWEE,        ^ MONEY to LOANI Un Property in all parts of the City or Couuty, No. 10 Sherman Street West, Bsar First National Bank KANSAS SALT GO. -OPERATING- Riverside, Western. Diamond and New York SALT WORKS Manufacture all grades of Salt, including Also the Finest Grades of Dairy and Table Salt Write for quotations. CAPITAL,, $50,000. SURPLUS, Ceo.000 THE F1IIST BANK IN RENO COUNTY. The First National Bank^ HUTCHINSON, KANSAS.  1       �rf<�* ....... tLim 'I 3106 2899 20   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication