Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Great Bend Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: November 30, 1960 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Great Bend Daily Tribune

Location: Great Bend, Kansas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Great Bend Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - November 30, 1960, Great Bend, Kansas                               PARTLY CLOUDY GREAT BEND DAILY FIRST PAPER Throughout The "GOLDEN BELT AREA" Of- West Control Kansas 85TH YEAR, No. 95 GREAT BEND, KANSAS, 30, 1960 SINGLE COPY 7c ISSUE 16 PAGES GRISLY SCENE near the Frank Schultz residence on the outskirts of Pawnee Rock Tues- day night after a single engine plane piloted by Frank Greene of Larned crashed into trees not 25 feet away from the house. Upon impact, the plane exploded and burned, killing Greene. Witnesses said the plane skimmed a freshly-plowed field then tried to gain alti- tude at the last minute, hitting a tree. A sheet, visible in the cockpit of the burned out plane, covers the body. Narrowly Misses Pawnee. Rock Home Larned Man Dies When Plane Falls in Yard A Larned man was killed atllO -feet high and that there was about p.m. Tuesday as his'no chance of getting the pilot out. escape his shadowers during single engine plane crashed intojThe fire was extinguished in lOilong, "hot surveillance" by FBI a tree on the outskirts of Pawnee! minutes time. j agents, says his attorney. Say Soble Made No Move To Shake FBI By HAL MCCLURE NEW YORK (AP) A New! York psychiatrist arrested as a j 20-year Soviet spy never tried to i Rock. Mrs. Frank Schultz. after hear- Boyd Franklin Greene, 43, the explosion and observing er of a trailer court in Larned, was killed when his plane struck i department for extra help. trees and exploded less than 25 fire was extinguished by the time feet from the Frank Schultz resi-i Great Bend firemen arrived. dence. None of the 10 persons inj Fire Chief Clarence Hyers com On the contrary, .the doctor even stopped his car so that a trailer court in Larned, j the fire, called the Great Bend fire agents, could catch up him, the lawyer said. Dr. Robert' in Soble, CO. was held in Sio.OOO bail the house at the time were injury mended the Pawnee Rock volun- 2 Soble whose ed- teer fire department for quick ac'is0'1ien -Witnesses said the tion and confining -the -fire to -thei two-place plane came in low over immediate area, a plowed field, skimmed above! pawnee County Sheriff L. 'B.i the ground and headed for a said Wednesday that of trees that borders the Schultz Greene, who lived at tlie trailer home. At the last minute the pilot 'court office at 135 E. iflh in Lar- Rightists Take Argentine Oil Towns in Revolt BUENOS AIRES, Argentina revolts erupted to- day at Rosario near Buenos Aires and in two oil towns of Northern Argentina. The army said the-Ro- sario revolt was crashed and un- official reports said at least one of the oil towns was recaptured. Reports from Salta. in the north said armed civilians occupied oil installations and. offices of the State Oil Monopoly' northeast of there in the towns of Tartagal and Vespucio. Later advices from Salta said the rebellion at Tartagal, 35 miles from the Bolivian border, had been stamped out. There Was no official confirmation here. Xor was there later word on the situa- tion at Vespucio, 20 miles south of Tartagal. Earlier in the day, civilian fol- lowers of ousted Dictator Juan D. Peron tried to seize the military barracks in Rosario near this cap- ital., but were routed by troops after tour hours of fighting, the government announced. Unofficial reports said 10 per ;sons were killed and 50 wounded Rosario. These advices said about 25 civilians were arrested. There were no estimates of casualties in the outbreak to the I north. I The government said the upris- ing in the north was similar to the one put down at Rosario. This indicated that Peronistas also were involved there. In both cases, the uprising was staged by armed' civilians. Insurgents in the north cut rail- way tracks and telephone lines, i first reports from Salta said. The army declared the uprising at Rosario had been crushed. Vandals' Spree May A special Centennial Preview Dinner Tuesday night opened Great Bend's participation in the Kansas Centennial next year. Feat- ured speakers and guests included Hal centennial chair- man, Great Bend.; Dale Eagleinah, president of the Chamber of Com- merce; Kent-Collier, Chamber ma- Mrs. Frank Haucke, vice chairman, Kansas Centennial Commission, Council Grove; .Rbg; er Kirkwood, executive- director, City's Centennial Program Complete May 24 as Centennial Celebration week IB Great Bend. Eoger Kirk wood spoke on gen- eral Centennial planning; at t h e state level and stressed that this is the golden opportunity for every .Kansan '.to "Sell Kansas to Kan- saas and .to sell Kansas to the He also outlined major Centennial events such "The Kansas Story" spectacular, the Kansas Exhibit in the Library of Congress, the World Food Fair and Kansas. Centennial the Centennial'Global Exposition, Topeka; Clyde Anderson, -Mrs. Haucke'described the SanU representative. Kansas Centennial! Fe Trail Caravan and its import- Commission, Topeka; and Owenjance as centennial year event Edwards, president, Santa Fe and outlined the art and museum Trail Highway Larn-! exhibits which will be shown over ed. I the stale during 1963. Mayor Don Weltmer' Issued a Hal Weaver outlined the Great proclamation designating May 9 tojBend "Centennial Stampede'' as a !six-day celebration featuring thciis sponsoring a street dance im- arrival of the Santa Fe Trail Cara-j mediately after the school concwt. on May 13 and the Santa Fej A Centennial Style Show under Trail Rodeo which will be auspices of the Business and May 11 through May 14. i Professional Women and (he Sor- Local events will start Tuesday ,optaniist Club will be held evening, May 9 with the unveiling i day, .May n. The firsi perform- of windows of Great Bend stores-ancr of the Sanla Fv Trail Rodeo which have been decorated by the will begin _a( 8 p.m. and will -be Barton County Historical Society. iprespntPd nighlly through Msy 14, and will continue through Sunday i The Barlon County Homo Dem- nighl. Jlay H with the last per- .onstration will sponsor Komi- formanee of the Santa Fe Trail ders Day May 32. Founders Day JKodeo. iwill honor a Pioneer and Wednesday, May 10, will feature the old settlors of the la night rodeo parade which is an.Coumy. (annual affair. The Great Bend Saturday. Hay 13, will fcaiure [schools will present "One Hund- the Santa Fc Trail Caravan par- j red. Years of Music" following the ade in downtown Great at 3 IParade. This presentation will be p.m. Made up of historical given in the courthouse square, representing the history of the old JThe Junior Chamber of. Commerce i (Continued On Page 2) PREVIEW Great Bend and Barton County-residents attended a dinner last night at the Par- rish hotel, to preview planning for the city's Centennial observance. Beans and antiques gave the Kansat room pioneer air for the banquet. for a .federal court hearing Dec. legal name is; Another case of'apparent juven-j -rile destruction -luV'poliee-docketet Soviet spy Jack Soble. 57. serv-; Tuef.day as a Bend fjrm re_ ,ng_a seven-year prison term for ported glass (lamage n.nieh espionage. total S2.000 before a .completel The government charged that check is'finished. i the brothers involved in rings that Lumumba Finds 'Federal Judges Level Friendly Area Segregation Barriers By MICHAEL GOLDSMITH separate espionage Wenclall M. Doonan, 37, Hoising- ton, the proprietor of Doonan attempted to bring his plane up. ned, took off from tbe Larned air- but struck a tree about five at about p.m. He had sought national defense, secrets i Truck and Equipment, Inc.. report- off the ground. it-en flying for about two years, transmission to the Soviet -ed.that vandals had brokan a nuin- There were indications Wednes-land had recently purchased thelUnion. Both brothers were nalur- ber of windshields, tail lights day that the plane had stalled outjplane he was piloting at the timejalized in 1947. and glass eauges from- various Dr. Soble, if convicted, could j trucks, trailers and combines In attempting to pull up, and had I of the crash. 'fluttered" into the trees, explod-1 In addition to fire-fighting the death penalty. The parked -at his lot at 2750. North ing as it hit. The Schultz family from Great ]ocal po. doctor. suffers from a serious ill-j Main. had heard no untiljijce and the .Barton County Slier-! ness, his attorney said. the some officials j department were on duty at were inclined to believe that the the scene as were members of the plane, if trying to pull up with patrol and law enforce-, gunred motor, would have crashediment officers from Larned and on through the small trees and County area. to the house where 10 persons sat; Firemen and police r ed off unaware of their danger. area the after sight. Investigation of the wreckage; seers made work difficult. 1 Doonan said the first glass brea- Soble was arrested at noon j dates back six weeks. A Tuesclav at Rockland State Hos- windshield broken then was subse- ing psychiatrist. The indictment suburban Orangeburg ef.rvpH as sunprvk' senea as supenis bv s federal grand jury also named 18 co-con- Wednesday revealed that the __. J-ut IJVU V do HVI wings, although badly wreckage until identification were not damaged appreciably by, bg made from a charred the impact nor were they pulled sodal securilv card about an hour away from the fuselage of the after the mish plane any appreciable amount, i _ _ Greene is survived by the Dave Appel, a neighbor who liv-Lvidmv> Irjs> the homei mo. ss west of the Schultz residence, ther, Mrs. Bertie Greene, a sis- .spirators, none of whom are de- The body was not removed from fenaants. They include several quently repaired. About a month ago a number of windshields were damaged, and then replaced. With- in the past week the vandals hit again, doing substantially more damage. (APj Fugitive ex-Premier Pa- trice Lumumba-today was report- ed to have reached friendly terri- tory some .400 miles cast the capital, well out of Col. Joseph Mobutu's reach. Some sources said he abandoned his plan to go first to Stanleyville and was heading instead toward another of his political strong- holds, Luluabourg, capital of Ka- sai Province. Countless rumors swept through the capital concerning Lumumba's one that he had been arrested after an automobile accident near Kikwit and was hos- jpitalized under a military guard. NEW ORLEANS (AP) Three Anderson Seeks Full-Time State Parole Board LEOPOLDVILLE, the Congo Pi Fugitive ex-Premier P.. :eder.al 3udSes catcall- jaid that he had just returned home when he saw the plane crash. A member of P a w n e Rock's volunteer fire department, he went to the station where he Soviet officials and four Ameri- cans. It took the years to collect evidence for an-j with rocks and BB Guns. indictment against Dr. Soble. got out the fire truck and notified! vices other firemen. Appel said flames ter, Lois, and two brothers, Char- les and Richard, all of Little Rock. Ark. The body was taken to Mortuary, Larned. and will be tak- Herlands en to Little Eock, Ark. for ser- smiled and gave his permission. The doctor bowed Police Chief Duane Moore, who I Tllis report was not confirmed inspected the damage Tuesday af-jbv any responsible source, ternoorr. said he expected the total! Friends of the Communist-lean- to run from S1.500 to Moore j ing former -premier said he was lovernment the vandals broke the definitely reported at Idiofa, T.T, a village in the Kwilu area of east- ern Leopoldville Province, and "acclaimed by the was continuing his overland jour- ney toward Luluabourg. Idiofa is 50 miles beyond Kikwit, in the heart of the Bambala tribal City police Tuesday were con- Apparently, Soble made friends; ducting an extensive campaign to. among FBI agents who arrested locate the vandals, him. He asked Judge William B. L, _ Herlands if he could say goodbye' Hospital, UOCtOT I fn I C" f I I f ing demonstrations for segreation swept aside every state- raised barrier to school integra- tion and enjoined- nearly all Loui- siana officials from interfering. "Th.it read the opin- ion, ''is clear that interposition is not a constitutional doctrine." Intel-position is a theory by which a state puts its sovereignty between the federal government and the people of the state. And, later added: "Without sup- port of the interposition act, the rest of the segregation 'package' passed by the Legislature falls of its own weight." of a white Methodist minister i TOPEKA whose five-year-old daughter eon-i ,wi.u tinues to attend one of tbe eity'j" two integrated schools, William Frantz Elementary. The but the ready had spirited JoltQ rec- ommend that the Board of Proba- tion Parole be composed of. three full-time members instead women jeered and yelled five psrt-time rncro- t Rev. Lloyd Foreman al-: Jj' his daughter i said a budget hearing he would not pinpoint hid into her kindergarten class by the ,uum nov back door proposed rhangas until he .his recommendations to the Leg- Foreman was target of similar j Mature in January. He has imti- demonstralions Tuesday when he! he wjll make major took his daughler to school by (he; sions in the paroie and penal svs- front door. The three judges had been asked to rule on two motions: One by the Orleans Parish School Board asking suspension of integration terns. The board requested ai expenses for the fiscal year and Budget Director .Tames Bibb cut this to One of until differences between cuts was the elimination of Further, the tribunal federal governments had been; a request for two additional pa- from the burning plane were about! Officials from the Federal Avi- CARM1CHAEL ation Agency in Dodge City were at the scene Wednesday, investi- gating the accident. U.S. Crime Rate Accelerates WASHINGTON f AP) Serious crime in the United States jumped 11 per cent over last year's fig- ures for the first nine months of this year., FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover reported today what he called "this accelerated crime rate" on the basis of preliminary figures covering most cities and rearly half of the country's rural areas. He urged more citizen coopera- tion with law enforcement agen- cies to meet the problem. Hooker noted that the first three months of this year wit- nessed a 7 per cent crime increase which grew to 9 per cent at the midyear mark and picked up an- from the waist and waved to the FBI agents. ''Thank you very much, he said. The government said the Soble brothers were born in Lithuania and during the 1930s roamed Eu- rope as Communist agents for the Soviet secret police. The indictment charged that in 1940 Jack Soble met the late Lav- renti P. Beria, head of the Soviet secret police under Stalin. In ex- change for permitting nearly .all the families of both brothers to go to the United States, the bro- thers agreed to act as spies here. Settle 'Cobalt' Suit WICHITA (AP) A out what it called series of measures which purport to abolish the Orleans Parish School Board." State Rep. John Garre.tt of Clai- bome Parish in the Louisiana Del- ta country in northeast Louisiana where segregation sentiment runs high, said the Legislature would I continue to cision. resolved. Another by the state abandonment of all permanently. role supervisors, asked: Harry 0. Lytle of Junction integration! City, chairman, indicated board would have requested mere The judges said: "Though we i supervisors but it felt "it im- be persuaded of Ihe school (hcm from good faith, there can be no tion of delaying still further the I The board damage suit against Dr. John R. Kline and St. Francis Hospital of Wichita was settled by agreement when it came to trial in district court Tuesday, Leopoldville Provincial President Cleophas Kamitatu, one of Lumumba's supporters. It is more than half-way from ville to Luluabourg. fight despite the de- enjoyment of a constitutional right iyear ancl ;which, was solemnly pronounced! J'yfle saitS he feit the Gov. Jimmie K. Davis declined the Supreme Court, of the LriUI.-isalar'r of S2911 immediate comment. State Sen. .French Gretna, across the ed Slates more. than six years! too low. Jordan oil Mississippi Sitting on the tribunal were! Chief Judge Richard T. Rives ofj the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Ap- peals: U.S. Dist. Judge At Lansing, Warden Tracy Hand jof the Kansas Penitentiary. Fsid he was in accord with Anderson's The Soble indictment said that Dr. received monthly reports during World War local headquarters in Rockefeller Plaza of the super-secret Office of Stra- tegic Services. Documents, writ- ings and photographs and notes allegedly were collected and sent to the Soviet Union. His arrest was the second The terms were not disclosed.) Mrs, Irma Katanson of Wichita ilrOrf 1C was injured by treatment with! ._ radioactive cobalt. TOPEKA traffic A jury found for the defendants death log: of three full-time Herbert i wi'h a that 100 in a previous trial but Mrs. Natan- son successfully appealed to the Kansas Supreme Court on grounds, the trial judge erred in his instruc-j tions.to the jury. I 24 hours to 9 During During Comparable 1959 riRhl" Recorded Call Ends Teens'Phone Spree River from New Orleans ob- served': don't know what we are fixing to do, but we are fixing to do something and' I'm to be for it. Our work is cut >Unie board for us." j Judge Wright issued the original! Hand said Ander Affv lafir rrPPinillinn Ipff i f i llOD WAS 8 1H ALCJ. jawc uremmion flnal effective-date to conr- the state capital hurriedly for New j ply with it. Orleans- j In its sweeping decision, The present While the court made" public its'judges issued temporary injunc-lsee? as many as 73 to 85 men IB decision, angry housewives anditions Gov. Davis, a day. he said, addi.np "Ther mothers thronged ouside the homei ,nott htve time M _______ Legislature lo prevent them from evaluate cases. stopping integration, j Hand suggested from hutf These individuals had been un-jto an entire da? per man in der a similar temporary restrain-lessary to evaluate tho individual ing order. situation. The women demonstrator! A girl who gave her name when she called a local business5 with a recording telephone answering ser-' vice led Great Bend police Tues- day to solution of a rash of ob- its kind in this area in little over month. On Oct. 27, the FBI ar- rested Igor Y. Melekli. Soviet united nations employe, and Wil- liam German-born medi- scene calls. ofj Fifteen youngsters from 12 to ter. The nine-months showred the sharpest increases in property crimes, with robbery .up 16 per cent, burglary 15 per cent, larcenies involving S50 or more up 9 per cent, and aufo theft 6 per cent. la Chicago federal court. crime from.Auto Here Another theft from an auto was! reported to police Tuesday. Mrs. Alvin J. Deutsch. 1200 Jackson, reported that Judith Ann 14 years of age have been impli- cated in the calls, and seven of the juveniles admitted making at least 30 calls. In all, the police department has received 49 reports of obscene phone calls in recent theorize many per- Isons were called who did not re- [port the conversations to police. onrT rlafo" cramps. WllflT Among crimes against the per- Deutsch had a purse and .papers son, forcible rapes led off with, an 8 per cent increase. Murders in- creased 4 per cent ard aggravat- ed assaults 3 per cent. and a coat taken from an auto parked at 10th and Washinf'Oii. The 'theft occurred so'meitSe the evening of Nov. 24. and dare" games, where one youngster would dare another to make a call, prompted some of the.calls, according to Police Serg- eants Jack Laptad and- Sam Pratt, who have been working on the case for several weeks. The ju- veniles picked numbers at random from the phone book, according to police. Laptad said he thinks the teen- agers, including eight girls, start- ed their spree at a teen party about six weeks ago. The fad then spread, involving more teenagers as it continued. One random number broke the case. A girl called a local termite control, service, and got a "record- ing answer" service. She began her call by giving her name, and when the recording equipment was played' back the answering serv- ice turned it over to police. Laptad and Pratt talked to the girl; at school, and she implicated the oth- ers: Laptad said the youngsters freely admitted making the calls, hut some were reluctant to repeat some of the obscene or highly suggestive statements they, had used over the phone. The teenagers-involved and their parents were summoned Vails can be the city juvenil? officer oner -Tuesday afternoon. Police Chief Duane Moore and detectives Pratt and Laptad sat in on the conversation. Wagoner released the juveniles to their parents at this session since all were first offenders. He said later that action would be taken against any teenager who later became involved in similar charges. Chief Moore said that the many residents who called in reports af- ter receiving calls helped police "fit together" the pieces which led to solution of the case. Moore: :said, asked the parents .to determine: from their children just how many calls they made and what was said, so that police can check against the re- ports phoned in to the police de- partment. In this manner the po- lice hope to determine: front of Foreman's home crowded; into an adjoining yard under po- teenagers. hce pressure and soon dispersed. !night parliy cloudy and mild; A bit later they went to the thp 20s; Thursday of Mrs. James Gabnelle, a white ploud a liule warmcr: fo The Weather GOLDEN BELT AREA To- partly mother whose daughter also tended William Frantz School: Tuesday. j Mrs. Gabrielle became incensed under the shouting and insults and j banged one demonstrator over the: winds 20 mph. Weather Data Thursday's Sunrise head with her pocketbook. The continuing boycott of Wil-i liam Frantz and McDonogh No. 19 I schools, held firm at Tuesday lev- el, news observers believed. Four white girls and one Negro girl at- tended William Frantr. three Negro girls and no white students attended McDonogh. An old state law may be used to close the two schools. The law, passed in 1922, says schools with less than 10 students may be kept open through a motion of par ish school board approved by the State Board of Education. Tuesday's High 38 Low 20 A Year Ago Today High 58 28 Humidity 53 per cent Baromeler 30.38 rising. KANSAS Temperaturei wfll average 5 to id degrees' above seasonal normal in western Kan- sas 'and about 5 above in eastern portions Thursday through- Mon- day; norlnal high in the mid to upper 40s; normal low 19 north- west, 30 southeast; little if anr.. precipitation is indicated for the period. j uwge.ul 10385074 ,i, >C   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication