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Belleville Telescope: Thursday, March 8, 1951 - Page 1

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   Belleville Telescope (Newspaper) - March 8, 1951, Belleville, Kansas                                %GHTY^FIRST YEAR - No. 29 MBMBBH Atnorr BOBEAD OF OIBCtKUATIOHB Total ches-to in 1951 Rain This Week Pushes Precipitation Well Ahead Of Same Period Last Year Block Unearthed at Cuba Recalling Names and Pastimes of Early Days Many centuries ago, Arab chief-] British became interested and the tains found that they had a great' A Consolidation of FQurte^iiVl|^       County Newspapers BELLEVaXETREJPtJBL^^^^ m^SAB^THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951 Will Carry Tanks via/Air Express U:CE:'5 CENTS deal of time on their hands and history records the invention of games which required playing cards. Traders brought these games into the courts of China. Now Is Adequate Warmer Temperatures Result in Greening of Wheat Over Most of Kansas Nearly an inch of rait) which fell here the first two days of March brings the moisture total to date for 1951 to 4.15 inches. That figure compares with 1.36 inches during January, February and the first week of March in 1950. Moisture records indicate that thcs four-month fall period, from September through December, in 1950 recorded 6.12 inches of precipitation in Belleville. The corresponding four final months of 1949 recorded 6.16 inches. Above normal temperatures during last week and part of this, and recent precipitation have resulted in a rapid greening of wheat and spring growth is reported to have started over much of the state. Surface soil moisture is now regarded as generally adequate in all parts of Kansas except in extreme northwestern counties. Following are the daily weather figures recorded in Belleville during the past week: Char. High  Low  Prec.    of day 46      22      .47    Pt.CIdy. bloody games of cards" later assumed political proportions as well as social ones. Naturally, whatever England practiced, her colonies followed suit,, so card decks were packed among family posses-I sions destined for the new territorial acquisitions across the Atlantic. Thus, card games became part of American mores and folklore. Further proof of this point may be discovered in the history of Republic county. In 1873, the town of Cuba was founded, a major portion of the residents being of Bohemian ancestry. Research shows that they were good people; who worked hard and had faith in themselves, in their land, and in God. Pastimes included square dancing, native dances, and card I playing. Research reveals that cards slowly A monument to that effect was infiltrated into the West. Every recently found on the farm of European town, no matter how Lawrence Sonntag. It is a marble tiny, was not without its social I block, 14 inches long and six card club. Gypsies carried their inches high. The inscribed square fortune telling decks into the realm is now in the possession of Fred of   Charles   I   of   England.     The ' (Continued from Page BB) ISSUE BUILDING PERMITS Three building permits and two sign permits were granted Monday morning, March 5, by. the board of city commissioners at their xegular__Jseaaion Buffs in Eeloit Touraei] Today Lose Final Game Friday Niffht at Marysville to Place Sixth in N. C. K. L. Belleville high school Buffaloes Class B Tourneu Results Listed Courtland, Cuba and Agenda Place Fourth In Three Competitions Class B basketball tournaments Date March 1 March 2 March 3 March 4 March 5 March 6 March 7 57 S4 50 74 65 43 36 19 23 34 24 18 .47 Cloudy Clear Clear Clear Clear Clear AWARD TO TELESCOPE A 60 Years' Distinguished Service Award was presented Friday to .The Belleville Telescope. The certificate, which carries the Great Seal of the State of Kansas, reads as follows: "The State of Kansas through The Kansas Industrial Development Commission desiring' to give special recognition to manufacturers who, by continued operation for a half century or more, have contributed materially to the growth, progressj and general economic Welfare of Kansas, hereby a^ftrwdg'^trr'^.veBelUjville. Telescope this citation for distingufsh-ed service." The award is signed by Governor Edward P. Arn and by H. E. Zoller of Wichita, K.I.D.C. chairman, and Maurice E. Eager of Topeka, K.I.D.C. director. 50 at Third UNESCO World Affairs Meet Approximately 50 people attended the second World Affairs Infititute in Republic county, held Friday night, according to Mrs. H. J. Adams, chairman of the local UNESCO unit. This institute was under the joint auspices of the Institute of Citizenship and the county UNESCO organization. During the af-tethoon session in the Belleville high music room, members and discussion leaders reviewed methods used by groups in other states and cities. Major topic for tnia second World Affairs meeting was the question "Is There an Answer to World Communism?" A brief historical background of Communism was given by members of the Institute of Citizenship along with the discussion of its theory and practice. Members attending the afternoon meeting then analyzed the ways and means of fighting Communism in the United States and in Europe. The evening's panel discussion pointed out that European people must be taught to help themselves through diversified means of production. Support will be guaranteed by the United States but it is ijot to be accepted as a gratis movement; retribution by the receiving countries must be made. General answer to the leading question, that of combating world cosjimunism, was "Man can think better on a full stomach, so give him the tools and teach him self-sufficiency through democratic means." The other element stressed was that of an informed public. Members of the institute emphasized that "only an informed public can keep the peace!" . The third World Affairs Institute will be held Friday, March 30, in the Belleville high school music room, according to Mrs. Adams. FILM AND STAGE SHOW ; Techiiicolor films featuring a toar of Europe and the importance of Soil to the general welfare of the nation will be sponsored by the Gould Farm Supply next Tuesday evening, March 18, at the high school atiditorium/ Other feature attractions on the "Minneapolis-Moline" dealer's program, which begins at 7:30, wi 1 be nationally-knovrn radio ballad singers. Free refrtjshments will be served after the icheduled stage performances. TO PRESENT FILM TONIGHT "Y^uveB of Green' is the title of ft; Technioalor'film to be shown in Bell^He loniBht (Thursday) at the R m^y Motor company build-'Tbe motion picture is to be ^t 7:30 o'clock, in con-'ith' 4n� � Ford program Aia U."Mfa Salute Amer- were defeated by Marysville last 1 involving Republic county schools Friday evening at Marysville, in i      Mankato,  Haddam  and   Linn their final scheduled game of the 1950-51 season. were concluded last Friday. Courtland placed fourth in the The Buffaloes trailed Marys- I Mankato tourney which was won ville by one point at half-time, the i ^y Formoso. Cuba ranked fourth score being 23 to 22. David Wright, ' and Haddam second at the Haddam Buff coach, estimated that the | tournament where first place went Buffaloes were hitting around 35 ! to Hanover. In the Linn tourney, per cent during the first half of I won by Clyde, Agenda placed the game. Marysville forged ahead i foui-th. in the second half for a final tally of 48 to 36. Throughout the N. C. K. league game, Belleville high Scandia and Republic teams were defeated in the first round of the Mankato Class B tournament. Rc- forwaid Dennis Lowry was high ! public lost to Courtland, 50 to 56; point man. Minneapolis Fir.st in League Final standing.s in the North Central Kansas league put Minneapolis in first place, Concordia and Beloit being tied for second place. Scandia was downed by Mankato, 32 to 68. Mankato tourney finals ranked Formoso, first; Mankato, .second; Montrose, third; and Courtland, fourth. Hanover defeated Haddam, 71 to 42 in finals of the tournament Belleville finished sixth in N. C. |at mddam. -Washington won K. T,., -a-.h two wins and^ Iobn-p ..'"am Cuba, 49 to 48, to place third. Acv.ordhig W^hfrJHfwmaafon slifeci. I Totimament standtngo- Hanovfer, for teams in the Beloit regional | first; Haddam, second; Washing- Denzel Forney, to erect a garage at 2721 N street. A. A. Kelly, to erect a temporary building at 2730 N .street. Clyde Graves, to build on a frame building at 1108 twenty-seventh street. Melton Motor company, to erect a neon metal sign at 1514 M street. Clyde H. White, to erect a rectangular wooden sign at 1915 N street. SAND ON SOUTH K A gravel surface on O street in the new Town and Country addition was completed by the city street department last week. City Manager W. I. Lane reported yesterday. Workmen now are applying sand on south K street from the end of the oil mat south to K street's junction with US36 highway, he said yesterday. SCOUT TOTAL $477.86 With a number of solicitation cards still not turned in, total collections to date for the 1951 Friends of Scouting drive are $477.86, Royal Henderson, chairman of the Coronado Council campaign here announced yesterday. The chairman urged those still having cards out to turn them in at the luncheon meeting of Belleville Lions club tomorrow (Friday) so that a final report can be made to the Salina office. -f- Let Contracts for Two US36 Jobs ASKS ALLEY CLEAN-UP Belleville's city street department is preparing to grade all alleys in the city, City Manager W. I. Lane said yesterday. All prop-' ertyowners-areTirged-tO'cooperate; he continued, by clearing away accumulated trash and debris in alleys. A number of vacant lots in the city also are in need of a spring cleaning, the city manager suggested in connection with plans to improve the appearance of the ! city. 239 AT TUESDAY BANQUET Two hundred and thirty-nine persons attended the annual 'Teacher-School Board banquet sponsored by the Republic County 'Teachers' association Tuesday night, March 6, Mrs. Thressa Kelly, county superintendent of schools, reported yesterday (Wednesday). This is an artist's conception of the turbo-prop powered YC 124B heavy transport the Douglas Aircraft Company has contracted to build for the Air Force. Capable of carrying a light army tank, the 22,000-horsepower sky giant is scheduled to roll off assembly lines at Long Beach, Calif., in the spring of 1952. In the cut-away view of the cabin, note the bunks built to accommodate crew members. Regradinff, Resurfacing At East County Line, Surface to Scandia Included Bids for 13 miles of long term improvements on US36 highway in Republic county were among those approved   Friday,   March   2,   by i the State Highway Commission. One of these projects calls for 5.8 miles of grading, base, single asphaltic surfacing and roadside seeding west from the Washington-Republic county line. Plan Irrigation Clinic at Four To Report Mondaij Superior Next Thursday For Induction Quota A short course on irrigation is Four youths fi-om Republic coun-to be presented at the Lower Re- ty are scheduled for army induc-publican Valley Irrigation Clinic tion next Monday, March 12, ac-next Thursday, March 15, at cording to information obtained Superior, Neb., city auditorium, from Mrs. Glenn Price, clerk of The event, arranged by the Cham- Republic county Selective Service bers of Commerce of Superior and . board. Omaha, will feature speakers who i Members of Monday's induction are national figures in their fields, group are Ernie Lee Frint of Belle-to give the best information avail- j ville and Armand Kay Kolman, able on farming with irrigation. | Donald Lee Kolman and Robert Farmers from Republic county, j Lynn Bormet, all of Cuba. Frint particularly those from the Kan- volunteered for induction at this sas Bostwick area, are urged to time, Mrs. Price pointed out in an-take advantage of the March 15 ir- , nouncing the list, rigation clinic. County Agent H. J. ' Ten other youths registered in Adams stated yesterday. The Republic county have been notified event at Superior will provide in- to report on Thursday, March 15, formation of value to all persons for Selective Service physical anticipating irrigation, he pointed examinations, out. j   Included   are   Elwyn   Clayton "Republic County Farm Bureau Denk, Clyde; Charles William had p anncd to hold an irrigation Shara, Narka; James Arthur clinic of this kind this year," Mr. i Turner, Troy; Clarence Otto Geb-I Adams said yesterday. "However j ers, Chester, Neb.; Donald Clar-' since speakers at Superior are to j ence Johnson, Scandia; Robert Eu-be leaders on the subjects which! gene Graham, Belleville; Robert they will discuss, we have decided � Leland Pounds, Courtland; Clar-to let the March 15 event take | ence Wayjie  Williams, Littleton, 200 Attend 27th Lions Banquet Representatives from Clubs in Seven Towns Here for Ladies' Night Council-Manager FormHirAd In Tuesdaq ITote Proposal for New Type Of Municipal Government Carries, 357 to 272 Elect in April Two Councilmen in Each Ward and Mayor Will Replace Three Commissioners Two hundred Lions and their ladies were served last Wednesday night at the twenty-seventh annual Ladies Night banquet of Belleville Lions club in the high school gymnasium. , Lions clubs of Clyde, Chester, Mankato, Concordia, Hays, Glasco and Lincoln were represented among the guests. John P. Miller, president of the Belleville club, presided as master of ceremonies Wednesday night. Keys for obtaining new club memberships were presented to H. S. Anderson and Roy C. Rist of the Belleville club by C. W. Mc-Kee of Hays, Lions district governor, who also spoke briefly. Judge W. D. Vance of Belleville and Mar- the place of a separate meeting in this county." Morning program at next Thurs- tournament this week, "Belleville placed sixth in NCKL but lost sev-ei-al very close games-an improved team." ton, third; Cuba, fourth. Playing at Linn, Agenda defeated Barnes Wednesday night, 50 to 48 in an overtime period. "The following night Greenleaf downed Agenda, 67 to 39. In the game to determine third and fourth, Clif-, ton won from Agenda, 59 to 53. i The   championship   play-off saw Play Osborne Thursday Belleville Buffaloes arc sche(l-uled to play Osborne in the Beloit regional tournament this afternoon _ (Thursday) at 3:20 p.m. Class | Qiy^g ,,ake 7 points in an overtime "A" pairings include eight teams, 1 pgViod for a final tally of Clyde with finals Saturday night at 8:15. i      Greenleaf 60^  Final standings: Summary    of   the    Belleville- i -   - Marysville game Friday night: Belleville-3G Sherwood	FG	FT	F	Pts. 	0	1	0	1 Spurney	2	1	2	5 Lowry	3	7	4	13 Neal	1	0	0	2 Mach	4	2	3	10 Hickman	0	1	1	1 Lamb, E.	0	1	0	1 Lindahl	1	1	3	3 Totals	11	14	13	36 Marysville-		48		 	FG	FT	F	Pts. Miller	7	0	3	14 Bergen	1	1	0	3 Breeding	6	2	2	14 Wall	5	1	2	11 Smith	2	1	4	5 Bedner	0	1	4	�1 Totals	21	6	15	48 The Buffs' "B" squad was dhfldg� fence. promote good will and to acquaint n*�- refeSients-'wi'li facilities avail-here for ihsin. -:-_�-,- Describes Success Of Cuba's Season Cuba high school has completed one of its most successful basketball seasons in recent years. Coach Kenneth P. Morris reported this .week,__CubgL_fijst-team ha.s worx-16 games and lost 8 games; the second team winning "14 games and losing 6 games. Cuba first team scored a total of 1,274 points in 24 games for a 53-point-per-gamo average. Its opponents scored 1,-040 points in 24 games for a 43-point average. High point man for Cuba this year was the team captain, Don Lang, who scored 500 points for the season with 69 per cent of his free throws made. This is an average of 21 points per game. Coach Morris points out. "Don Lang has been outstanding in basketball at Cuba high school for four years," the coach continued,- "scoring a total of 1,474 points or an average of 16.2 points per game in 91 basketball games. He has � made good 280 free throws out of 486 for a 91-game average of 58 per cent." Other outstanding scorers on the Cuba team have been Ray Reynolds with 235 points and Don Baxa with 220 points. Cuba will lose three of its 20-man squad by graduation, including Don Lang, George Bednar and Le-Roy Klima._^_ EGG AND CHICKEN PRICES Prices received by Kansas farmers for eggs increased 5.7 cents from mid-January to average 37 cents on February 15, according f to the U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics and Kansas State Board of Agriculture. This month's increase followed a sharp decline the preceding month and brought., prices to a level nearly 10 cents above a year ago. Kansas farmers received an. average of 23.5 cents per pound for thickens in mid-February, the agencies say, up 3 cents from January 15 and more than 8 cents above the Feb^-uary 1960 price. ^^^^^ TO READ LEGION HISTORY History of the-Robert E. Gordon Post No. 133, of the American Legion, will be read by Mrs. K. M.Blair during the Legion's birthday celebration, on   the   evening J)f..... Thursday, March 15, according to Virgil White, adjutant. Members of the auxiliary and the Legion will celebrate. the thirty-third birthday of the American Legion post here with a pot luck supper and a^ special program. Greeting cards for St. Patrick's Day now on display at The Telescope office..t^Adv. .Copies of   

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