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   Globe, The (Newspaper) - January 6, 1878, Atchison, Kansas                                THE A Daily Evening Poster Devoted to Cab and Gossip, and Paid Locals, _ ____________ PRICE, TWO CENTS. .ATCHISON, KS., JANUARY 7, 1878. VOL. 1. NO. 15. Important tO Young tVlen! neee.-sity of at tending to business! I replied, faintly. "I gave 1 lir-t and pleasure after wan I. lie would il liiin to cure the hiccoughs, and when he attempted to drink ii he it'll Handkerchiefs, Suspenders, Neckwear. Gloves, Hats and Caps, rnderwear. etc., THOMPSON CENTS' EMPORIUMS rather sUy at home nighu- with the demdest best and prp.ttie.-4 uoiniin in 1 the world, but lie ean't. you bitn.'1 -All. i hat's wiiat did ii. tin- Now. 1 don't see why ('buries ha.- In) way with tlnse women. No discretion, woik so hard tor fifteen hundred a year. Yon ought to have known that cold when a neighbor of ours, who has the water ai time of night is ihe worst same, kind of a pu.-ition. and the same thing a man can drink. Ye.-, the. water salary, through everv evening by ELLS BAILKY, kecy uv-[ o'clock. It is tnu: this neighbor i does not spend his evening at home. J" A. SOKTUN SON, rmld and M Ji'uclrj elr. '1 j but he don't-have to toil at night like j poor Charles. After tea lie lights a r.old and c D I na.-ty cigar, tells his that lie is go- j itig to have a "little bout wit'i Ihe ell-. -lit) i 'mnMM. b'hovs." and. if be comes home "full" UgiiV" I C'V which the disgusting brute, means cos. A- JOe; i-'jiir.'jk. to ,-ee that he doe.-n't g i to bed record. The policy wa.--ignally defeat- ed. the party remained ma-icr of the tield. and tbe.re was nothing for the President to do bin accept det'eai or change his parly. lie -eem.- to eho-en ihe latter alternative, and his ilirtation with the Democracy ha-end- ed in an elopement. The opening of the -e.-.-ion will probably the of Democratic and ['residential jijbilation in the di.-closiire of an avow- did it. He'- not used to water at ihN time of night. Ho will come, to about, six o'cloi k to-morrow morning. In the meantime ju.-i roll him onto a mattress, throw two or three blanker-: ness in not coming to rhe re-cue ol tin over him, and let him --leep quietly, "Teat reformer in hi.- iirst peril, for IK The Democrats their shrewd- Good night." As flip doctor turned to leave. I -aw a lurking grin on his face. When he, ot into the: ball 1 heard a smothered V Quueii.-uiue. Kurt, we with his boots on. lie .IVl "lull" laugh, and when be got into the -treel D1 KtiAL TKNOKK KKSTA CHANT Wn. ills of times, more 4iame to him. But Charles, after lea. he must lie away to bis office, or to the lodge. or to the club, as the case, may be. But SCHAAI, 1'ro. i Us. I 1 ivo tickcU I'oi JhinuPi 15. :iini tU'.'i lor in rriuoki'r's he never comes home "lull." That' probably had not bid high enough. If they will now do tor him what they re- fn-cd to do before (he recess, lln; prc- -aimplion is that he has made a rai.-e on bis hit! As he had already offered the all thai he bad to give with- out giving himself, he mu.-t be con-id- having gone over to them bodi- c.oiihider this one un uneeliugold wretch, i ly. If he receives Democratic support but Charles has always as strenuously now. it must be a -iu-e of thi-. ol llu: Viilli'y. muilfni homcil is 1 will ask him s. sir." bravely replied ouryoung -ln-uld he was honesl. i liles.- he's noted for he attend clmrc.h remilarly. t. he came home so! I like to know what the doc-! tired i hat it as much as he could doitor was going to when he .-topped tongue being actu- at "A clean of dry'' ,-_'- -__-- ally ihick; and a-for standing.steadily I wouldn't make  V er.riiiijoin'lat. retail conu'hs very badly. I had read some i lllm :l 'InnK. It I thmi i hate the  cj j bard. Rut I would rather j I have him work hard ibait have him -Light oi my (hie) shoul. low me to j woi'k drink your ver'good (hie) In draining the goblet, he. lost his home "I'liH" like j K'l UKIMXG roy.s j? glance and went over backward in a odious neighbor of ours. i MASllA'lTAN l''iu- A. U'liilfi.i dead taint. Of course] wa< frightened lirmv you will allow me to "HimV VTO to cbnrcliV NVhy. be oes to iirayer-meeting every Thursday ight. lie does, honest." "Does he, stay at home "Certainly." he "Oh. no! Far from if, 1 as.-urcyon." "Drink'r" ditl lie graduate. V" Vale and Oxford, both." -S.-is he a tine library, and every fa- iciN'y for writing intelligent to death. uttered a piercing alHict with Anlher conWbu.ions) ul'N. Y Khl.M-.Y Ai.-lMl'sUN. I'livuiuire in thi' Di; UKU.I. LKWIs, :iml Atchison. Hnoiii? mill (jlfii-i1, airuot, shiir.-. scream, which aron.-ed the servant girl, i J sha11 1'i'obably have something to say j who came, rushing into ihft room scared iaboiil soulless employers who work :1J1 thc-ir poorly-paid to death. "TnC finest in Atehison." "Has he a deposit at any of tin; banks i nearly out of her senses. i "What is ihe .-he asked. i her teeth cbatlering from terror. 310 for the doctor this I ARABELLA. She is Thankful that She Hasn't a Drunken Husband Like that "Odious Neighbor" of Hers. To tin; Eilitciv (if the Globe.: cried. "My husband is in a dead faint. Recent dispatches from Wa.- 1 indicate that (he. President has been ring you a eer- tilicate it you say A' "Well, I am glad there are no risks to run. and I'll think about it." I tragically exclaimed, as I sasv I putting in his lime during flic holidays, her hesitale. and begin to smile (at what I know "Co this in.-tant and fetch our family She went. 1 threw myself upon my poor, over- land that he feelu very much encourag- ed by what lie has done and learned. 1 nt.fitiei.i your issue w hhn 1 what has been going on. but we have I noticed that the prominent war-horses of the Democracy have recently been you request ladies to contribute to your paper. This is my excuse for penning the following lines. I have been married about six months. My husband is all the world to me, on- ly he will slay out late at nights. This fault is ihe only one I find in him. He is kind, gentle and good-humored, and during all .our married life has never spoken harshly to me. .But he will stay out late at night. It is true he has urgent business at his office, and has to attend the lodge, the club, and other places, but it seems to me that he might arrange his business so that it would not absorb all his time, .-is for die lodge, the club, etc., he might give them ill) entirely, or attend only once in a while. 1 have told him as much a hundred times, but he only kisses me, and says in his genial, good-humored every endearing epithet in the vocabu- lary, as if that would fetch him to con- sciousness. I kissed his hands, his forehead and his dear lips. I showered tears upon his noble face. In short, I was in a perfecl of grief, when the physician made his appearance. The wedding having'., opened out favorably, we desire to suggest on our own account that Louis Roch.'U. -121 Commercial street, ha.- as fine, a -lock of presents as ever .-aw. Mr. Hochat will sell um a good article very nearly as cheap as you can assuming an air of uuacciisiomed im- j buy an inferior one ;U any oihe.r place, ponance: they seem to strut around j Von cannot gel along without gloves, with a more lordly air. to hold their 'although you may get along for awhile nose.- higher and to thrust their chesis j newspapers. Charley Thomp- out more obtrusively than ever, and son has the best assostment in Atchi- tbis demeanor, taken in connection j son, if you have any interesl in the sub- j with the lively cheerfulness of the Pre.--1 jecl. and will sell, thorn to you at -ijuare Xever before was T so glad to see his benevolent, fatherly face. I rushed to him, and. throwing myself at his feet, f frantically cried: "Oh, doctor, if you value my Imppi- save save my poor, .stricken hti.-band." "Arise, my good he gently .-aid -you nniy rest, assured that wlil do all I can for him. Let me feel his pulse. Why, it beats wildly! He breathes regularly. Blessed if he doesn't even gently snore! This can't be a faint! his a clear ea.se of way. thai I don't uiult-istand the in-! What was in that broken goblet? idenf, warrants the belief that sotneUiing is up. What, that something maybe can hardly he a matter of conjecture. As far a-the Republican parly is con- cerned, the President had little reason to hype for any suet-ess, and less reason to indulge in pride over the prospect of a reconciliation. The close oftheses- sion left him completely overthrown, routed, horse, foot and artilury he had chosen the issue and the battle-ground, and the tight had been fought. The Republican party, by an almost unani- mous vote, had declared that it wanted nothing to do with him or hU policy. No difference, what other merchants have to advertise, don't fail to see X. Htetter before buying dry goods. The lines! line, of meerschaum goods ever brought to Atchison is now on exhibition at Gns. Brandner's. ('undies at half price at Miller's res- taurant. Closing she. stock to go out of the line. Another lot of the favorite "Model" arrive at Ter- ry's Temple of Music early this week. The demand for these little beauties is and placed itself very squarely on the only equaled by their excellence. fSPAPEJRI   

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