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Atchison Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: May 8, 1966 - Page 1

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Publication: Atchison Daily Globe

Location: Atchison, Kansas

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   Atchison Daily Globe (Newspaper) - May 8, 1966, Atchison, Kansas                               "John Falter Days" At Atchison's River's Bend Art Fair- J i" JOHN FALTER (center) with Ms daughter, Suzanne as Mayor Wil- EARLY VISITORS at the Falter exhibit in the Wallace Gaslight ONE OF THE POPULAR spots yesterday at the fair's opening was ANOTHER FEATURE for the fair is the Hospitality Knom being liam Randall officially opened the River's Bend Art Fair and Arcade building were (from left) Mrs. W.P. Pago and her son, the sidewalk cafe in the Gaslight Arcade. The cafe features stroll- operated by the Jaycees and Jaynes in the Hotel Ai'chison, which proclaimed "John Falter Days" in Atchison in the 500 block on Judge Edmund L. Page and Banker John Adair. The Falter one- ing musicians, wrought iron and checkered cloth-covered tables reopened Friday for three days for the convenience of guest art- the mall yesterday. The framed proclamation was presented to man show, major feature of the ArtFatr.will be open from noon for visitorswishingtobe served. JuniorGuildladies are hostess- ists and visitors. The Jaycees and Jaynes are furnishing infor- Artist Falter along with the keys to the city at the ceremony, until 7 p.m. today when the fair closes officially. es and Atchison High Kayettes are serving as waitresses, mation, refreshments andnny other photo. Art 3air Sidelights ATCHISON GLOBE The weather man smiled and Atchison was Mrs. Effie Hart the River's Bend Art Fair was of Dodge City, sister of Fred off to a happy start yesterday Stein, sr., and formerly of Atch- morning. ison. The 500 block on the mall bustled with activity. It was a gay and exciting scene as the visiting artists registered in and began installation of their beautiful hometown and work on panels throughout the again see all my friends. block. Going full speed and working as hard as they have all during the many weeks of preparingfor the fair were the members of the Atchison Art association and was 57 years ago that my wife American Association of Uni- and 1 were married." versity Women, the sponsoring organizations. Atchison should lift its hat and give a big bow to the heads of thesetwoorganizatlons.Mrs. lection of photography studies C.F. Stolz, AAUW president, of Artist John Falter made by and Mrs. William Charron, Art Frederick Stein, jr., and ar- association president, for the ranged outside of the Wallace terrific job accomplished by Gaslight Arcade building where their groups in making the event artists registered yesterday, the success it is. The photos show ArtistFalter at work on a Saturday Evening Many persons thronged the Post cover from start tofinish. mall early, enjoying visiting with friends as well as watch- ing with interest the artists ar- ranging their exhibits. Among the visiting artists and greeting many friends she has in TEN CENTS PER COPY KANSAS SUNDAY, MAY 8, 1966 34-PAGES EIGHTY-NINTH YEAR 2B979 "It was 57 years ago that I married and left Mrs. Hart said. "It is always a wonderful joy to return to my once 'friends." Among those greeting Mrs. Hart on the mall was Harry Ham, retired Globe advertising salesman. They had a good visit and Harry remarked: "And it Accompanying Mrs. Hart were Fred and his wife, Helen. Attention getter: The col- Man Can Control Almost Anything Nowadays-Except A Woman And A Tornado! Helping Photographer Jess Torbett of The Globe record the Art Fair on camera was his (Continued on page 2) Former Local Man River's Bend Winner First place winner in the art contest of the River's Bend Art Fair here yesterday was Carl Blair, Greenville, S.C. Blair's award vanning work was an abstract oil painting. Blair is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd J. Blair, route 3. The second place award of went to Barbara Wiley of Leav- enworth for an oil portrait. Audrey Bodner of Prairie Village, with her watercolor scene in Bonner Brings, won 5 the third place. 6 Blair, a 1950 graduate of 7 Atchison High school, has gain- g ed considerable fame for his 9 MO-KAN AREA Clear to partly cloudy and cooler. Kansas Clear to partly cloudy today and tomorrow, cooler tonight; high today about 80 north to upper 80s south. cloudy to- day and tomorrow wlthpossible showers today; high today SO- BS. Thermometer readings: 2 p.m........... 3 p.m........... 4 p.m. 5 p.m........... p.m........... p.m........... p.m........... p.m........... art works and haswonanumber Low yesterday morning 62 of awards in the south. Temperatures a year ago today- He is professor of art at Bob Lovv 68> Mgh 88> Jones university in Greenville, ________ having taught there since 1957 RIVER STAGES following his graduation from Omaha 6.2 down 0.1. Kansas university. He received Ms BFA at KU and earned his MFA degree at Kansas City Art City Commission To Take Action On Flood Curb Project The city commission will act quested in July or August and on a resolution at its meeting construction initiated in Oc- tomorrow at p.m. at City tober. Federal cost of theproj- Hall pertaining to the acquisi- ect is estimated at mil- lion of right-of-way for the cut- lion." and-cover storm conduit proj- The resolution on which the ect from Seventh and Main commission will act tomorrow along the south side of Main provides the method of paying east to the Missouri river, for the easements and utility City Manager Al Thelen said relocation costs together with yesterday that local costs on damages incidental to the proj- the project are estimated at a ect. It also authorizes the ti- maximum of nancing of the project by the mum of depending on issuance of general obligation the outcome of additional feder- bonds. al assistance the city has re- Thelen said the city will fi- quested on utility relocation, nance the local share by the "During the past week the city issuance of temporary notes has received a request from until such time as the actual Col. W.G. Kratz, deputy district costs are available, director of the U.S. Corps of "The commission on Aug. 28, Engineers for local assurances 1961 expressed its intent to relating to the White Clay Creek sponsor this project in a reso- Thelen said. "These lution it approved at that assurances as well as other Thelen said. "This newresolu- procedures, including the ac- tion reaffirms the original quisition of the necessary resolution." rights of way must be ac- Involved in the acquisition of complished prior to the initia- right of way east from Sev- tion of bid requests for the enth and Main is land owned by construction of the project. the Missouri Pacific Railroad "Tentative schedule calls for the invitation for bids to be re- (Continued on page 5) Spurs Buddhist Action Ky Says He'll Hold Reins Another Year LBJ Proposes Pact To Deny Moon Sovereignty Crossroads Report Dear Editor: My medium rich cow atten- dant neighbor says it was re- vealed to him one time when SAN ANTONIO, Tex. "The moon and other celestial tary purposes. Twelve nations he put on a Free Barbecue that president Johnson proposed bodies should be free forexplo- have signed this treaty, Includ- humanity suffers from a great Saturday that the United States, ration and use by all countries, ing the Soviet Union and the (Continued on page 5) Nebraska City 7.8 down 0.3. Rulo 7.9 down 0.2. St, Joe 10.2 up 0.1. Atchison 11.43 up 0.18. Leavenworth 8.4 up 0.1. SAIGON, South Viet Nam 76 (AP) Buddhist organizations called Saturday night for strate- gy meetings on the heels of a statement by Premier Nguyen Cao Ky that he expects his mili- tary regime to remain In power for another year. The statement at a news con. turmoil In April, Mayor Nguyen Van Man said Ky's statement surprised him. "We are in for a bad he said, If Ky stays on. Ky made his statement at the Blnh Tuy Alrbase near the Me Free complex. People feel obligated to get their share of anything that is free, whether they need it or not, and even if it is more trouble to get to it than it is worth. So he expects whenFreehos- pitalment starts, our hospitals will have to stack their patients five or six to a bed, like cord- wood. Without discrimination as to race, color, or sex, of course. D.E. Scott Crossroads, U.S.A. Seven-Vehicle Crash Fatal To St. Joe Woman KANSAS CITY (AP) A 78- year-old St. Joseph, Mo., wom- an met a fiery death Saturday in a burning car, one of seven vehicles Involved north of Mid- Continent International Airport, Mrs. Edith Essman was In a car with her daughter, Mrs. Edith Stout, 53, St. Joseph and her husband, Meryl Stout, 52. The Stouts were reported ser- iously Injured. Two truck drivers, who were in the crashes, said the smoke from a grass fire beside the highway probably caused the Soviet Union, and other space powers join In a treaty outlaw. Ing military activity on the moon and denying anyone or any nation lunar sovereignty. Johnson said the objective Is to make sure that American astronauts and those of other nations can freely conduct sci- entific Investigations of the No country should be permitted United States, but some non- to advance a claim of sover- signers have staked out claims eignty. there. Such claims are not rec- "There should be freedom of ogntzed by the United States or scientific Investigation, and all the Soviet Union, countries should cooperate In Asked whether Johnson's scientific activities relating to treaty proposal represents any celestial bodies. new concern thai the Russians "Studies should be made to might beat the United States to avoid harmful contamination. 'he moon, deputy press secre- into, .rnou in "Astronauts from one country tarv Robert H. Fleming told Nonmllitary goals in outer give any necessary help newsmen at press headquarters space are attainable, Johnson L coun here: see that conclu- said, and in his view a treaty Is of another coun. slQn Qf (j needed to lay down rules for exploration of the moon and oth- er heavenly bodies for peaceful purposes only. Johnson said the treaty pro- posal will be discussed first In the United Nations by U.S. Anv try. "No country should be per- mitted to station weapons of mass destruction on a celestial body. Weapon tests and military maneuvers should be forbidden. "I am convinced that we He explained that U.S. studies have reached the stage enabling Johnson to outline In fairly spe- cific terms what he feels should be, done to guarantee peaceful uses only of outer space. The United Nations In 1963 bassador Arthur J. Goldberg in should do what we only adopted a resolution establish, the 28-member U.N. Committee for our generation but for future lng a that ,nelnbers on Outer Space. see to It that would not station nuclear weap. After that, It would become a serious political conflicts donot ons or otner weapons of mass matter of formal negotiations arise as a result of space actlvl- destruction in outer space ties. I believe that the time Is Sucn a resolution does not among nations involved in outer space exploration looking to- ward a treaty. Johnson said "the elements of such a treaty would be as fol. lows: r'Pe for action. We should not have the same force as a formal lose "me." treaty. The treaty would be some- Johnson discussed his propos- what like that barring theuseof al In a statement issued by the Antarctica for the use of mill- White House Press Office. It's Cheaper Now Around The NEK Area Pork Chops Back On APPLE BLOSSOM QUEEN Jan Shields, 18, _ Wathena, was named Queen of Four cars were Involved In- Itlally In the incident. One was the car carrying Mrs. Essman. It caught fire. While the car was burning, a truck slowed down at thescene, kong River delta town of Can was hit In the rear by a car. An- tcr of Mr. Tho, about 100 miles southwest other truck unabie to stop Shjcids win ference could set off new polltl- of Saigon. This was the first struck the Stout car The Stout cal unrest in South Viet Nam. time that he had spelled out couple was helped from the car clearly the objectives of his Stateside Gl Menu The Buddhists are demanding an early end to military rule. In Da Nang, scene of antl-Ky Dln passers-by were unable free Mrs. Essman. to Report Crushing Defeat For Regiment Of Viet Communists man military directorate. "I expect to stay In power for at least another year perhaps until the middle of next he said. "There Is no doubt about that." He also said he and the army would fight any "neutralist or Communist" government If It emerees from eeneral elections temore, Severance, Tedde Sue Kj-added however "1'am Membcrs of the Atchison Fire Sinker, Highland, and Huth Ann sure that the majority of Viet- Department will be Inspecting McCoy, Elwood. namese are anti-Communist. I fire Hydrant Check May Discolor City Water Members of the Atchison F'ire WASHINGTON (AP) The in prices. the Donlphan County Apple jotinson administration Salur- Saturday's announcement not- Blossom Festival Friday night day reversed an order curtail- ed that pork prices had dropped at the Troy High school. ing pork buying for the military, sharply since January. Miss Shields, a senior at the It acted in the face of declining Wathena High school anddaugh- hog prices and considerable and Mrs. E.W. farm belt criticism, represent Doni- More bacon, ham and pork phan county at the Apple Bios- chops are In store again for som Festival in St. Joe May 12. armed forces at installations in Ralph Martin, John May and the continental United States as Bunn Rhea, members of the result of the announcement by Alchison Kiwanis club were Secretary of Defense Robert S McNamara and Secretary of judges. The queen contest and Agricullure Orvllle L< Fyree. an effort to elude hotly pursuing U.S. air cavalrymen and South Vietnamese troops who already have killed 416 of them. The allied units wiped out all but a scattering of the mixed Viet i Washington and the U.S. Embassy here withheld com- ment. "We expect the water to be stirred Soden said, "so citizens notlcingrusty or muddy SAIGON, South Viet Nam the possibility of new civilian fourth straight day, continuing are anti-Communist" I flre hydrants tomorrow and of a smashed disorders. their protest of the killing of am sure that no such Tuesday, accordingtoAssistant Communist battalion threw Premier Nguyen Cao five students by government menl will be elected." Chief Willard Soden. away their weapons and melted had promisedpowerful Buddhist soldiers April 21. TWO soldiers into the countryside Saturday In groups his military regime also were killed In the clashes. would step down after elections The battleground victory on In aeptember or October for an the central coast overshadowed assembly to draft a constitution, other told a news conference he ex- U.S. pects his government to remain that despite the arrival of mon- tug ui me In power for another year, soon warplanes numa, u- Cong-North Vietnamese Buddhist organizations In Sal- had blasted targets in North and Assembly some time early this ment recelve many phone calls force of 400 to 500 men In two gon promptly called for strategy South Viet Nam. Ial1' September or October, days of fighting on the rain- meetings. A delayed report told of the Drafting of the National con- soaked coastal flatlands on Antlgovernment Buddhist riot- destruction by U.S. planes of stltution by the assembly. South Viet Nam's central coast, lng Jolted the nation last month, two spans of the BacGiangrall- Another vote for a Legislative But while the UJS. command One aspect of those disorders road and highway bridge 25 Assembly which, In turn, would claimed the biggest allied bat- was still to be seen Saturday, miles northeast of Hanoi, the name a government according tleground victory In weeks, oral- At the Vietnamese resort of Da- northern capital, cutting a vital to the pattern of the now-de- nous signs appeared on the po- lat, a student group staged a. litlcal scene, bringing with them sit-down demonstration for the (Continued on page 2) (Continued on page 2) program was sponsored by the man Troy Kiwanis club. dw notspeclfv Justwhen Other contestants were Jan- pork buvlng be stepped ette Kanning, Troy, Jeanie Dlt- Up but said it would be soon. The order which was reversed had Instructed all the armed forces to reduce by 50 per cent for a period of six months their Freeman had recommended the reversal. He made public, earlier in the week a letter In which he told McNamara: "Hog prices are now about 20 per cent lower than in January, and pork prices are also down. Prices may Increase seasonally during the next two or three months, but we expect prices later this year will be below current lev- els." Graduation Edition Tina Jarrett, 5, daughter of for a period of six months their llie Globe in cooperation with Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Jarrett, servings of prime pork products Atchison merchants today pays Troy, was crownbearer. to personnel at continental U.S. tribute to graduates of schools bases. The services were told to in Atchison and the area with its Ray Patton, president of the Troy Kiwanis club, was mas- use such Items as chicken, eggs, annual Graduation Edition. ter of ceremonies at the pro- and developments According to Ky, the political colors in their water should not gram presented by high schools selected beef Items Instead. said prOKram for the natlon shapes alarmed. of the county ThatorderwasissuedFeb.lv up as follows: Atchlgon citv Watcr Elections for a Constituent Works, each time we inspect hydrants and we are hoping that previous warning will stem some of the calls and reassure those per- sons who noticedlscolorationof their water supply." Soden said that within a few hours the discoloration Is gone, afler sharp Increases In pork Tn nnriNi7r rtiuQ prices In late 1960 and early this TO year, but Its existence did not Nortonvlllc Donald D. become generally known until Callenius, Topeka, a Scout lead- early April, er, will be at.St. Joseph's school Some farm.belt congressmen cafeteria Wednesday at protested, and a delegation of p.m. to help organize a Cub Midwest pork producers came Scout pack for boys from 8 to It to Washington to seek reversal years old. 'he order. They argued that Boys of this age and their par- supplies were Increasing cnts are asked to attend. and there had been a sharp drop Along with pictures of the graduates there are stories con- cerning commencement exer- cises to be held during the com- ing week. In some instances, pictures of graduates were not available at this time and will bo published in later issues. Also, due to space limitations not all of the pictures The (llobe received from tlm :trea schools are included. Tliuse, too, will appear in later issues ,1s space permits.   

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