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   Times-Tribune, The (Newspaper) - May 7, 1911, Waterloo, Iowa                              t- ESTABLISHED 1870 REACTIONARY MEMBERS OF THE G. O. P. IN SENATE HAVE PLANS ARRANGED. ALL IMPORTANT COMMITTEES PACKED 11 Big Corporations Are Lending Their Support to These Senators in Effort to Defeat Pro- gressive Legislation. BY CLYDE H. TAVENNEB (Special to Times-Tribune) Washington, D. C., May re- actionary republicans in the senate are lying in wait for the farmers' free list bill and otier progressive legislation passed by the democratic house is becoming mora evident daily. The obvious motive ia two-fold, to protect the monopolies and profits of the tariff trusts and to prevent, if possible, the democrats from fulfill- ing promises made to the people. The group of Senate Tories is stll able to exert a tremendous influence apon legislation. Having packed all the important committees of the sen- ate with men who take the same atti- tude toward the particular legislation, to come before them that the big cor- porations take, the re-actionafies are in a position to continue serving spe- cial privilege by obstructing the pass- age of measures desired by the people. Among those whom tie public may Bafely rely upon to oppose most of the progressive House measures are Gal- linger, Smoot, -Lorimer, Guggenheim, Stephenson, Lodge, Oliver, Warren, Perkins and a dozen others, who will at all times have the hearty co-oper- ation of Vice President Sherman. Back of this group of reactionaries are arrayed tariff trusts, railroads, Wall street, Standard Oil, and the balance of the organized wealth, of the country. Pitted against this combination are the democrats and the progressive republicans. The latter forces will, when necessary, undoubtedly com- bine to prevent the passage of a bad bill, but they will be helpless at times to prevent the Tories-from obstructing the .-passage of progressive house leg- islation such as the farmeis' free list torn. Aldrlch, Senator De Facto. Co-operating wiib. the group of Sen- ate Tories that in planning to fere with, the passage of aucb. 'anti- trust measures as the free list bill, is Nelson Wilmartb. Aldricb- ol Rhode Island. Nominally Mr. Aldricb. is con- nected only -with an institution of his own creation, called the monetary commission. The commiseion has a suite of rooms ad joining'ths roams of the finance committee, to which will go the free list bill. If it should happen, opines ths Clev- eland Press, that the door were open betweela the rooms of the finance committee and the rooms of the mone- tary commission, it might happen that former Senator Aldrich might com- municate with Senator Penrose, the new chairman of the finance commit- tee, and thus the titular head of the new senate majority might have the benefit of the views of the ei-leader (and possibly leader de facto) of the tfnited States senate. As a matter of fact Mr. Aldrich keeps Ju close touch, with, all the re- actionaries, just as he did while of- ficially a senator. BY A LIVE ALMOST MIRACULOUS ESCAPE OF YOUNG MAN ON LOGAN AVE. Broken Wire Pulls Free With His Weight and Burns and Bruises Alone Are Suffered. An accident occurred at about this morning that might have been fatal and only a fortuitous circum- stance prevented it. Shepard Owen, operator of the mov- ing picture machine at Dreamland the- atre, while going home, ran against a wire hanging across the sidewalk let ween Dane and Chestnut streets on Logan avenue. He grasped it ii> throw it aside and was violently thrown to the wire was a broken one that crossed the trolley wire that point Luckily the other end of the broken wire was also free and in failing he pulled it clear from the trolley wire to the street. He was badly burned about the hands and face and his clothing was torn considerably by his struggles while the voltage, lessened by the looseness the wire, was not suffiC' isct to kill or stun. Had the other end of the wire been fast, another tragedy would have shocked the pub- His escape is well nigh miracu- lous- LYNCH TWO NEGROES. [By Associated Press.] Louisville, Miss., May with attempting to poison the family of Johnson Pearson for -whom they worked, two negroes, Cliff Jones, and Bruce White, half brothers, were tak- en from officers near here today by a mob and hanged. {WATERLOO, IOWA, SUNDAY, MAY 7, DEBATE ON THE FREE LIST BILIi NEW SERIES NO. 1740 FORMER SPEAKER CANNON AT- TACKS MEASURE IN BIT- TER TERMS. DEMOCRATS HOPE TO PASS BELL MONDAY Speech of President Taft Before the Publishers irt New York Wa Also Ridiculed by the Ex- Czar of the House. [By Associated Presfi-1 Washington, May house wit- nessed the termination late this after- noon of the memorable debate on the tariff free list hill. Former Speaker Cannon had a good audience today when he spoke against the bill. The seats -were deserted dur- ing the remainder of the day, however. The close of today's session ended general discussion of the bill. Mon- day, the measure which is the first of the democratic tariff bills to come be- fore congress will be subjected to at- tempts at amendments; hut the democratic leaders hope to secure a final vote on its passage before ad- journment that day. Representatives Cannon, Bowman, of Pennsylvania; Gardner; of New Jer- sey and Rees of Kansas, opposed' the today. Speeches in. its favor were made by Representative Fields, of Kentucky, Collier of Missisippi, Cart- er, of Oklahoma; Llnthieum, of Mary- land, Morgan, of Oklahoma; Dent, Alabama; Faisou, of North Carolina, and "Wilson, of Pennsylvania. Former Speaker Cannon referred to the hill as "halm in gllead" ottered by the democrats to the farmers because of the passage of reci- procity bill. He asserted that its benefits would not be important. Mr. Cannon demanded to know why live cattle, i-ice and other products of the south had apt been on the free list hill, when these products of the north- ern farmer had been deprived of pro- tection by the reciprocity measure. He claimed that the southerners on the ways and means committees had demanded protection. "I believe this secret agreement never would had been made if it had not been demanded by the great pub- lishing Said Mr. Cannon. Mr. Cannon said that the speech be- fore the publishers in New York was a "fine piece of better than any- thing of Mark Twain's when the presi- dent urged the publishers to be con- stant in favoring the passage of the reciprocity bill without amendment "I lost my temper over' the reci- procity said Mr. Cannon. "I felt that those who represented 'two thirds of the people were willing to sacrifice the others to answer the hysterical cry Taised by the newsna- pers. Oti 'A RAMPAGE "AGAIN YOU rtAN AND BABY CAST OFF IN WATERLOO. Flirtation Began Through a Matrimon- ial All the Way From Mississippi. Superintendent'Of the Poor Klinga- amaa got tangled-in a wrecked rom- ance yesterday .when his, services were called ia for a young woman with a child who claimed she had no means of subsistence and was located at 1715 Commercial street Investigation proved her a stranger in a strange land, destitute and the victim of a peculiar train of circumstances. Her name is Mrs. Kate Bngle and she has a little girl three years old. At the age of twenty-two she has been a widow for about a year and a few weeks ago lived at West Point, Miss- issippi a levee town a short distance south, of Memphis, Tenn., on the Mis- sissippi river. West Point is a steam boat landing where cotton, lumber and oil cake are the principal freight and where niggers outnumber the whites about five to one. Mrs. Engle was romantic and she advertised in a matrimonial paper for a husband. She had a few dollars, was pretty and affectionate ly. Henry Batters working for a. Mrs. Kate Olds at Fairbanks heard or read of the widow and through Mrs. Olds (Henry cannot write it is said) a cor- respondence, which she evidently con- fided to a friend of her late husband, one J. B. Gregory of West Point, was hurried to the point where Butters proposed and she accepted and he told ier to come and she sold but and came, paying car fare and ar- riving in Fairbank with something less thaa in her purse only to be flatly turned down by Butters whose ardor cooled when he faced supporting a wife and child 'at close range. Not knowing which way to turn or what to do, she was advised by the thoughtless if not heartless laborer and his educated promoter to come to Waterloo and did so, bringing Henry Butters' and Mrs. Kate Olds' letters, also one of Gregory's which thanked ier for presents bought and sent to friends in her old home and cautioned ier against sending any laoro letters n packages with presents as 3rd class mail. In the meantime she lias lost her TWO OF THE MOST INTERESTING MEMBERS OF CAMORRISTS FACE ABBATEMABBIO. DENOUNCED BY PRIEST Vitozri Became Frantic When He Failed to Weaken the Government's Leading Wit- ness Remained Calm fBy -Associated PrfsaJ Viterbo, Italy, May of the most interesting of the alleged ca- morrists charged with the murder of Geanaro Cuoccolo and his wife con- fronted Gennaro Abbatemaggio today. They were Luigt Arena and Giro Vitoz- zi. Abbatemaggio said he heard Vitoz- zi, the priest who is one of the ac- cused, discussing the Cuoccolo murd- ers at o'clock the morning after the assassinations. Vitozzi replied that he could prove that on the day mentioned, he was at tne cemetery of Poggiorealo, of which he was chaplain. The confrontation of Abbatemaggio by Vitozzi was theatrical. The "angel of the camorrists" was evidently try- ing to cast magic over the informer. But this produced no effect as Ab- batemaggio calmly repeated his accu- sations. Vitozzi then became meldramatic and shouted: "Swear it on the ashes of vour "I swear." _Vitozzl became frantic crying: "Forge, perjurer, attacking me, an ec- clesiastic." Abbatemaggio smiled and said: "You stained the ecclesiastic Vitozzi "Thief, infamous one, may the Al- mighty curse you throughout the gen- erations." Luigi Arena took the confrontation jokingly. He was quite as calm and cool as the informer, and at the end said: "You know Neapolitan story tellers who go on for hours relating their tales, so long as they receive cigars for their reward. Here is a cigar for you, Abbatemaggio go on." C. C. PRICE AND BABY YEINGST PASSEb Mr. Price Dfed-Tis the Result '.of Can- cer at the Little4 Girl Had Been in III Health. After an. illness dating back to a time eight we.eks ago, C. C. Pries died yesterdayj morning at at the Presbyterian hospital where he had been undergoing- treatment for the past four weeks, death resulting j from cancer. Deceased resided at 139 Adams street and had been a .resi- dent of the city a little over a year, moving here from Sunnier a year ago last February. He was bprn-'In Maxfield, Bremer county, July' 4, 1SG8, and after residing there a number of years re- moved to Sumner where he was mar- ried and a year-ago eaine to Waterloo to make his hoffle. He is survived by his wife and fife children. One child preceded death. Those living are as Miss at ami Amanda, Min- nie and RobertJat home. The funeral Services will be held at 10 o'clock fromjthe late home and the remains will be'-itaten at noon over the Great Western "to Suraner where the burial wil Hake-place Tuesday after- j noon at 2 .o'clock. Girl Died. Following ajblfief illness Blanche C. Yeingst, the "five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Yeingst resid- ing at 850 Fowler street passed away Friday evening at 8 o'clock, death re- sulting from spinal menir.getis. The little girl was -born in Cumberland county, Pa., on. Nor; 8, 1903 and had been in ill health for some time. The funeral services will be held this afternoon from the late home and burial will occur in Fair- view. DIEIZ WILL NOT TAKE THE DEFENDANT DECLARES THERE IS NO UNDER OATH. MAKES LONG ADDRESS ADVOCATE "SANE" FOURTH. [By Associated Press.] Joliet, HI., May Allen, mayor of Joliet, today advocated pre- perations for a "sane" Fourth. He suggested public gatherings with mns- ic, speeches, shows and public fire- works. trunk which contained and also lost her pocketbook with something over and is without any visible means of support, so Supt Kiingaman will send her to Fairbank by 'he next daylight train, keeping her at a hotel in the meantime and directing hfir to go to Mrs. Olds and advising that lady and her hired man to send victim of their experiment back to her south- ern home, paying her way liberally. The letters from Butters Via Kale Olds will probably be kept here till is safely at home as a guarantee of her getting there, they being considered sufficient evidence to secure her re- turn by them at their expense, if the has to be appealed to, VETOED. [By AMociated Press.J Des Moinesirlpwa; May or Carroll tofla'y vetoed the Dunlay bill, passed recent legislature which teams must turn out so that automobiles may pass to the left from The governor today signed the Ciarkson bill provid- ing better prelection for miners and the "omnibus insurance" bill to cor- rect the insurance laws. These com- plete the measures enacted by the re- cent legislature. Will Probably Take the "Cameron Dam" Defender a Week to Make Closing Talk to the Jury. Refused Automobile. fBy Associated Press.J Hayward, "Wis., May Diets on trial for the alleged murder of Os- car Harp, asked Judge Reid tonight to furnish him an automobile and allow him to go to his old home at Cameron Dam to collect evidence. He claims a diagram introduced by the prosecution to show that a bullet could have clear- ed the lumber piles in traveling from the barn to the body of. Deputy Harp is "manufactured evidence" and that the lumber piles were lowered to allow the alleged line of flight to clear them. Judge Reid replied that the court had no authority to direct the trip. Although the state expected to fin- ish its case today, it obtained a con- tinuance until Monday morning. Six former sheriffs, "0. S. deputy marshals and deputy sheriffs testified to Dietz's alleged dangerous attitude toward process servers. John Dietz said that it was not like- ly that he nor his wife nor Leslie ivould go on the staand. "There is no use in our going on the stand after what I have seen here. It looks as if my word without oath was as good as with he said. He said his closing address might last a week. PEORIA LANDS CONVENTION. [By Associated Press.] Chicago, May Illinois divi- sion of the Travelers' Protective as- sociation at its twenty-second annual convention today endorsed Peoria for the national convention in 1912. The meeting of the state organization will be held in Danvillev Daniel Ginnivan of Springfield was elected president. NEBRASKA WON. I By Associated Press.! Lincoln, Neb., May de- feated Kansas in a dual track meet here this afternoon, 61 to 48. Real News Service You have noticed hcnv complete is the Times- Tribune news service. Nearly every morning this week the Times-Trib- une has furnished sensational news of the Three-I, baseball league doings. In fact, readers have become accustomed to looking to the Times-Tribune for the real, reliable news-of the world. Other papers are forced to follow along ten hours later with the same news and-then not so complete. Northern Iowa's Greatest Newspaper is bringing fame and trade to Waterloo. JUDGE PETIT UPHELD WPiT OF HABEAS CORPUS LY ISSUED. INTENDS TO HAVE THE CASE REVIEWED Attorney John J. Healey Indicated That Case Will Be Carried Up to the Appellate Basis for Decisor.. [By Associated Press.! Chicago, May A. J. Petit, in the district court today declared that Illinois senate could not force in- spection of the private accounts of Edward Tilden. His decision upheld the writ of habeas corpus obtained by Tilden. G. W. Benedict and W. C. Cuuimings, arrested on charges of con- tempt the state senate, in refusing to present the accounts to the Helm committee. The decision took nearly an hour to read. It was seen from the first few- minutes reading that the judge would uphold the contention of the defend- ants' attorney. Attorney John J. Mealy, represent- ing the Helm committee was given ten days in which to file exceptions. Te indicated that the case probably would be1 reviewed by the appellate court. Judge Petit based his decision in large part on tlie premise that the whole proceedings before the Helm committee i were invalid. 'It will be clearly said the court, "that the main question involv- ed here is whether the senate commit- tee had the power to order Mr. Tilden to produce his books. There must be evidence to show that the witness had evidence in his possession. The court took cognizance of re- ports to the effect that he had is- sued the habeas corpus writs before Tilden-Vas arrested and he contended that "even if .the papers had not been served until a few minutes 'after the arrests it would have been immaterial in this The decision said: y> "If by any quibble under the circum- stances' of'the case rit could be con? tended that the subpoena calle'd for the personal appearance of Tilden, be- fore the senate a motion to quash the writ would have to be denied because of the illegality of the whole inquiry." "It must be expressly understood, however, that if the resolution author- ized the committee to investigate con- cerning the alleged acts of miscon- duct of the present members of the senate during this or any session of the senate this court does not hold that such a committee could not com- pel any person to appear and produce papers and documents." The formal order releasing Tilden, Benedict and Cummins made no refer- ence to the payment of costs of the court action. MAYOR'S APPOINTEES WILL BE- GIN WORK SOON. First Work Will Be to Draw up By- Laws for Own Anx- ious for More Men on Force- Nothing of any importance had been filed yesterday with City Clerk Thomp- son for the council meeting Monday evening and it is expected that the meeting will assume the regular rout- ine order. Several ordinances will come up, among which it is believed is the building inspectors ordinance, which was to have been read at the last meeting, but was not completed. The two civil service appointees have failed to file their bonds as yet but it is expected that they will be filed some time Monday and will come before the council for its approval in the evening. It is not believed that there will be any objections made to them and the civil service fight is about all over. The police officials are very anxious the board shall start work, there being a number vacancies wish filled at the present time and have been for months seriously hand- icapped by the lack of men. In many cases the night men have been com- pelled to work overtime, and a num- ber of the day men have been forcci'. to the same. The board had planned on a meet- ing last week but owing to tiie ab- sence of Paul Smith from tiie city, it was impossible to hold the meeting. Their first action will be to adopt by laws and rules to govern themselves, after which will come the real work of examining the list of candidates for positions on the police and fire departments. FIRE DESTROYS FACTORY. Freeport, 111., May factory of the Freeport Shoe Manuactnrina Co., was destroyed by fire this after- noon. The loss is estimated at 000. PROMINENT AMERICAN DEAD. London, May Cank-y. Ives, director of the City Art museum of St. Louis and widely known in the worid of art, died during tho night. following a stroke of paralys yester- day. ARMISTICE DECLARED OFF AND 1NSURRECTOS BECOME AC- TIVE AT ONCE. FEDERAL ENVOYS SEEKING PEACE Would Not Consider Resignation of President Diaz at One of Condi- president Diaz One of Condi- ference Was Ended. [By Associated El Paso, May armi- stice covering the Chihuahua dislket and all unofficial communication be- tween ihe Mexican government and .the revolutionists were broken off to- day. Tonight the insurrecto a nuv un- der Gen. Francisco I. Madero. Jr.. is preparing to flght. Juarez will be the first point of at- tack but the rebels probably will not move for another 24 hours. "The inexplicable ambition of Presi- dent Diaz" who refused to accede is the rebel demand that iio make lic announcement of his intention to resign was the expression by whicl: Gen. Jladei-o tonight epitomized tho reasons for the break. Judge notified Dr. Vasquez Gomez today that not continue peace negotia- tions on the basis suggested by The rebels. The rebel chief reused to extend the armistice. A st-ie-tMiient- was Issued by Gen. Madero in part as follows: "I invited the people of Mexico to take up arms against when legal means to bring about the v.ill of the people had been exhausted. While Gen Diaz is in the power, nii the laws will be fictitious and all the promises tricks. In order to obtain peace I asked him to make public the intention which he had manifested privately of resigning. In order lhat he might not feel humilnted I pro- posed that I also resign as provision- al president even manifesting to "him that I would accept as president for the interim, a member of his cabi- net. If the war continues, it will ba due solely to the inexplicable ambition of President Diaz. He, tuerefor-3, will ,be alone responsible lor all the ery-Which the war may .-.cause." Judge Carabajel had received sever- al messages from the .Mexican gov- ernment during the day but not until after the armistice had been trminat- ed did he send his answer to Dr. Go- mezs' demand to a reply from Mexican government. Judge Caraba- jel's reply was thai he could not con- sider the ptoposal .that Diaz resign though ho evaded spect'is mr-ntjon of the rebel demand Dn Diaz Dr. Gomez replied to Judge Cara- bajel: "I acknowledge the fact that peace IKIVC been sus- Just whelli-r Carabajel ac- tually Tr-.msmitieU w the Me.vk-an government the proposition by the rebels ih.ii Ub.i an- nounce imj.vion to has been dermiisij contfnni-l. ;i Up leaders are of t'ie op'n'.ii that Use government out >f to Presi- dent Diaz did not wish to acknowledge that it had entertained such a propo- sition. Everyone in the iusurrecto camp is preparing for tin; opening of the Campaign of hostiii'.ca Gen. Navar- ro's garrison tonight is scouting the hills to north in amninaticvi of an in- surrecto advance. The rebels ara waiting for orders to move which are expected tomorrow. All tiie revolutionary leaders, with the exception of Dr. Vasquoz Gomez, were in conference tonight with Senor Bniniff. one of ihe SQ betwcns.. Sen- or Braniff one of the go-bet.veens. Senor Braniff made u last appeal to them to prevent a resumijtion of the hostilities. It is inferred that lie explained to them confidentially the contents of a long message which he received from Minister Limantour this afternoon The conference was still in session at tonight. SLUGGED AND ROBBED AT INDEPENDENCE Waterloo Police in Search of Man Said to Have Come to This City Af- ter Doing the Stunt. The police last night received a long distance telephone call from In- dependence asking them T.O arrest a man who held up one of the Independ- ence citizens last night and after beat- ing him up, robbed him of several dollars in currency. The man is want- ed for assault and robbery. An excellent description was sriven the police and it is believed that he will be picked up on one of the morn- ing freights in over the Illinois Cent- ra! as it is said he caught one of the heights out of there after pulling off :he stunt. All officers were instructed to be on the lookout for him and an extra number we're sent to the railroad yards to watch for him. CITY CLERK ARRESTED. fBy Dissociated Press.] Council Bluffs, Iowa, May W. Cassndy, former city clerk, of Coun- cil Bluffs was arrested this afternoon on an indictment returned by the grand jury charging him with the em- bcxzlMnent of Sfi.365, from the He was already under bonds in a lo- al conn for preliminary hearing on similar cb.a-.-go brought by a surety company, bosulsinrn for Casstdy as city clerk. He was released in J3f i bonds.   

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