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Waterloo Semi Weekly Courier Newspaper Archive: July 6, 1906 - Page 1

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Publication: Waterloo Semi Weekly Courier

Location: Waterloo, Iowa

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   Waterloo Semi Weekly Courier (Newspaper) - July 6, 1906, Waterloo, Iowa                             48TH YBAB friw, WATEELOO, XOWA. FRIDAY. JULY 6, 1006 wnom no. THE FOREIGN NEWS BUDGET William J. Bryan Visits the Eng- lish Commons Today. An Heir to the Kaiser's Throne Born at Potsdam. The Longwprths Leave London. British Sporting Events. [By Associated Pi-ess.] London, July J. Bry- an was an interested visitor in the house of commons today. Iiongwoi-ths iu London. London, July snd Mrs, Lpngworth, started for Paris this morning.: Foreigners Won Cup. Henley, Eng., July Club Natitique de Gand (Belgium) defeat- ed Trinity Hall, Cambridge, in the final for the Grand Challenge cup. The cup leaves England forthe first time in its history. Miss Sutton Loses. Wimbledon, Eng., July Sutton of today lost the tennis championship of Great Brit- ain, being defeated by Miss Douglass. Heir to Kaiser's Throne. Berlin, July Princess Frederick William was safely ac- couched of a son at yesterday morning. The guns of a battery of artillery began to fire slowly in the square op- posite the palace at about noon and tens of thousands within hearing of the salute stopped in the streets or paused in their work, counting the guns, for it had b'een announced that 72 shots would be fired for a girl and 101 lor a boy. Seventy-one! seventy- two! seventy-three! -Then the city knew that an heir presumptive had been born. An hour later copies of the Official Gazette containing the fol- lowing proclamation were given away: "Her imperial and royal highness, the crown princess of the German em- pire and Prussia, was happily deliver- ed of a prince at a. m. in the marble palace at Potsdam to the joy of his majesty, the emperor, her majesty, the empress, and the 'entire royal house. This pleasing event will be made known to the inhabitants of Berlin through the usual cannon shots. The crown princess and the prince are in the best, condition. Von Wedel, Minister of the Royal'House." All the public and many private buildings are .decorated with flags. Elected to Go to Prison. London, July Kenney and the other women suffragists arrested in Cavendish square June 21 for creat- ing a disturbance outside of the house of Chancellor of the Exchequer As- quith, are proving embarrassing to the magistrates by insisting on mar- tyrdom. The magistrate almost begged them not to repeat their performances before Mr. Asquith's residence, but they all positively refused and- the court finally ordered them to furnish bail of each for their' good -be- havior for a year and in default to undergo six weeks' imprisonment. They all elected to go to prison. The Henley Regatta. Henley, Eng., July the semi-final for the Grand Challenge cup Trinity Hall, Cambridge, beat the Argonauts (Canada) by half a length, Time, H was a magnificent race. Foi the first quarter of a mile the boats' noses were level. Trinity Hall then slowly forged to the front. Half the distance was reached in The Canadians then" were hardly a quart- er a length in the rear. The Trinity Hall crew always re- sponded to challenges with a slight quickening of its-stroke and held the lead to the end after one of the best races ever witnessed at Henley. The Club Nautique de Gand (Bel- gium) beat third Trinity, Cambridge, by two lengths. Time Victims Robbed. Salisbury, Eng., July po- lice have been informed by the rela- tives of one of the victims of the wreck here Sunday, whose name is not announced, that a large sum of money was stolen at the time of the disaster, and a careful investigation of the story in being made. The bulletin issued at .the infirm- this evening says that Robert S. Critchell of Chicago and B.'W. Sen- tell of Brooklyn, N. Y., who were among the passengers injured, are Improving. The hbard of trade inquiry into the disaster has formally begun. It will be .thorough- and all the expert testi- mony possible will be taken. It was learned today that the time in which the boat train should cover the 115 miles to London is 113 min- utes: In. a Quandary., 'London, July townsfolk of Bradford are divided by ;a discus- sion whether to .risk drinking their respective, of the decomposed body of a man found in the reservoir or to empty the reservoir at a loss of to tae tax payers. The engineer of the water works (leclares.lt is safe io drink the water, because the reservoir contains 000 pounds of while the weight of the corpse, is about 140 pounds. The contamination, there- fore, he claims, is go minute to be negligible. The hyglenist ylew, however, fa- vors emptying the reservoir and nocketlng the loan. Meanwhile tho water Is being uecd. Kot1 Moral liwtnu-ttoii. Elwiwoh, July to pro- twit.fl nnnmcUrlnu moral Instruction in the schoojs by an international pro- paganda was taken by the internation- al 'ethical conference, which was held here yesterday. The conference also planned to arouse the conscience of civilized nations regarding the treat- ment of subject races. Felix Adler of New York presided over the conference. Representatives were .present from all the leading European nations, and there were four delegates from the United States and one from Japan. At a public meeting last night Professor Adlev discussed the origin of the ethical movement in' the United States. Urges Zulus to Fight. London, July Keir Hardie, the socialist, independent labor lead- er and member of parliament, has ad- dressed what is considered to be a most extraordinary letter to a Zulu subject in Edinburgh, in which he says the wholesale1 massacre of na- tives now going on in South Africa un- der the 'pretense of suppressing a re- bellion which does not exist fills one with shame and horror. "I Mr. tfardie wrote, "the day will come speedily when your race will be able to defend itself against the barbarities now perpetrated against it." Foreign Briefs. senate of Hamburg has determined to rebuild the church of ,St. Michael, destroyed by fire. The first subscription, was cabled irom New York by .Herman Stachow. Large-contributions from merchants iere have been promised. It has been found that only one man, the bell ringer, perished in the flames. Japanese authorities on July 1 transferred the control of Muk- den, Manchuria, to Japanese civil ad- ministration. The American consul, Thomas Sammons, has returned to Mukden to conclude arrangements with the Chinese for the opening of Mukden arid Antung to foreign trade. He gave a banquet yesterday to the Viceroy of Mukden, Count Matsura; :he new Japanese minister to China, M. Hayashi, and other prominent Jap- anese and Chinese officials.' L. Mason of Boston has :ontracted with the Russian pianist Jabrilovitsch for a tour of the United States and Canada, being in November next. Austrian delegation yes- :erday adopted the-navy estimates. Count Monte Coccoli, commander in chief of the navy, in a speech said the majority of Austria's warships no onger met the requirements and the government intended to reorganize .he navy. Paris, July Gener- al Baudouin of the supreme court :oday concluded his argument in the Dreyfus case, formally asking the court to quash the verdict of the S.ennes court martial without a re- ;rial. Counsel for Dreyfus began the closing address. Losses, of Two Victims of Monday's Fire Settled Yesterday. INSURANCE WAS John Homrighans and Emil Walth- er, adjusting committee for the Jrepier County Farmers' Insurance company, were in the city yesterday and made settlement for the five an- imals killed .in the fire at the Tom Barker.feed barn Monday. The settlement was'.'entirely satis- 'actory and was especially appreci- ated because it was so promptly made. W. J. Loveland of Janesville received for his three horses ind for harness a total of .Carrie Roarbacher of Janesville eeeived for her team of mules. Roy Bushnell, who lost two horses n the fire held a Continental policy, which stipulated that damages would )e given for injuries "on the prem- ses." Up to'this time Mi-1. Bushnell las not received anything and be- cause of this clause it is probable hat he will be unable to recover damages. The Black Hawk county farmers larried insurance with the Farmers' Mutual, -of which L. H. Bronson is These losses will be ap- praised by the directors at their reg- ular meeting the .first Saturday of .he will be next Satur- day, July 7, and will then be promiit- y adjusted. Dr. A. J: Mueller, who spent Sunday and the Fourth' with his mother and other relatives at Iowa City, returned vome this morning. DOGS. BICYCLES. BABY_CABS. New Rules in Force on W., C. F. y. Railway. Traveling Passenger Agent Cheney of the W., C. f. X. has issued an important bulletin to conductors in which he says: On local lines iij Waterloo and Ce- dar Falls .conductors must charge 10 cents for bicycles and 20 cents for ba- }y cabs; on. the interurban ines the fee shall be 20 cents for each. In the cities letters and .packages iven ..conductors'.-to be mailed, being stamped, shall cost 10 cents. The Charge dogs, accompanied by owners shall be 20 cents. When not iccoitipaiiled by owners .dogs will not oe accepted. In issuing transfer for dogs, baby cabs or .bicycles, .conductors. shall mark across the transfer the partic- ular kind of animal or.thing carried. Packages of reasonable size in the hands 'at passengers will not be charg- ed for. WASHINGTON Attorney Genera! of Philippine! Other Mewi. [By AKBociated Press.] Washington, D. C., July tbrney General' Lebbmis B. Wilfley of tile Philippines has been to the jHrtgeshlp of the United fttaten court'in China.' Tho post Is oito or great ImporUnce. WHITEWASH FOR WHITE Efforts Making to Prove He Was Not a Roue. Thaw Treats His Fellow Prison ers to Ice' Cream and Cake. New York, N. Y., July K. Thaw, under indictment for the mur- der of Architect Stanford White, gave his fellow male prisoners at the Tombs a pleasant surprise yesterday by treating them all to ice1 cream and cake. Thaw requested the Rev. John A. Wade, the Episcopal clergyman who attends to the spiritual needs of the prisoners, to get enough to go around and send the bill to him. Mr. Wade did as requested, buying forty- six quarts of ice cream and thirty doz- en cakes. Thaw's wife was not permitted to visit him, the rule excluding .visitors being in effect the same on Sun- day. John B. McKenna, head of a detec- tive agency and said to have been em- ployed by Thaw to trace Stanford White, was one of the first witnesses examined by Assistant District At- torney Garvan. When he reached the criminal courts building he had with him copies of the reports made by his agency to. Thaw. These reports were Lurned over to Mr. Garvan and will, beyond doubt, be used when the Thaw ;ase comes to trial. It is reported that the testimony of McKenna corroborates the story told by Paul L. Bergoff, the 'detective em- ployed byAVhite, it is said, to shadow :he men in Thaw's party. Bergoff said, before he was called on to give his statement, that he was-ready to-go on the witness stand and prove that White was not the kind of man he has ieeu painted. i I. W. Rorke, ex-superintendent of the business conducted by McKeriiia, was examined further, by Mr. Garvan. florke is authority, for the statement ;hat Thaw was unfairly dealt with. 3ther detectives than McKenna were examined yesterday. REPORT SHOWS AVJJLLi. Perpetual B. JD. Ass'u Made Per Cent Interest for Six Months. Raymond. July immer of Gilbertville lies at the point of death here at the home of O'Connor Bros., suffering from a kick in the stomach and inflicted by a horse at o'clock last night. It is doubtful.It.the young man can Zimmer, who- lives, with his mother and brother on a farm near Gilbert- 'ille, had'come to .Raymond to attend he celebration and had tied his horse near the elevator; While doing so he vas viciously kicked in, the stomach >y a strange horse. He was found lat- er and taken to the home of the O'Connor Bros., where a physician was called from Waterloo. He has been suffering untold agony since the acci- dent, and there is'little hope of a re- -overy. The report of the Perpetual Build- ing Loan association, G. R. Turner beert made, showing ex- cellent results for past six months. The disbursements-ha.ye been S90.- 2S2.09 and ihe. receipts of the .same, composed, of the following 'items: Cash on hand-, Paid on installment stock, SS. Loans on re'al estate repaid, 330. Loans on stock repaid.. Outstanding orders, Interest earned, Membership fees, Taxes and interest repaid. Real estate, The assets amount to 'a total of of which Is for loans on real estate.. The liabilities are the "same amount as the assets cheif which are out- standing orders amounting to 234.01. The earnings, for the" lust half year ivere over 3.9 per cent, a very credit- able showing. Attcl Gets Decision. Los Angeles, July 'Attcl, 3hampion feather-weight ,of the ivorld, was awarded the decision last night in the 20-round battle with Frankie Neil, the bantani champion. At'tel showed his advantage by his leverness, landing six blows to Neil's one. Tern; Hautc's Troubles. ___ i Terre Haute, Ind., July Stimson today issued sta order for the arrest of Mayor Bidaman and his at- torney on charge of contempt of court, which had prohibited the mayor's, in-, .erfering with a session of the council Monday night. The council had pre- viously found the mayor guilty of fail- ire to enforce the excise laws and had mpeached and ousted him. ROOT IS OFF. Tlie Secretary of State Leaves On Ills Southern Trip. New York. July of State Blihu Root sailed from New York yesterday on the United States cruiser Charleston on his. three" months' Soutfi American tour. He was accompanied by Mrs. Root, his son Edward, and his daughter. Miss Edith'. He will go around Cape Horn, and returning 'will cross the Isthmus of Panama. From July 25 to August 6. he will represent this Coun- try at the third Pan-American con- gress at Rio Janeiro. Brazil. Jyo previous secretary of state has had such an extended tour by sea. In preparation for .the long voyage the navy department has fitted up the warship in a sumptuous 'manner. .Spe- cial quarters have been prpylded for tne secretary and family. The In- side "passage from the straits ellan to Valparaiso being too shalld-.v for the Charleston's draft, the party will be transferred In the straits to a Chilean, man war, in 'which the journey will be continued on the Pa- cific side. FIREWORKS Persons liijiirtal at Excelsior, Jlirinesotn. [By Associated Press.] Excelsior, July prem- ature explosion of o quantity of flrc- Works .inv front of the Cnslno Uist night caused a panic among five thou- sand people gathered to witness the display. Tnree parsons' were sort- Injured. Oysters nro not Rood lo cat (111 they are 4 years old. THE The German lloat lient.s Us Frrucli Klval Decisively. New York. July see-out'! eastward transatlantic rm.v between the Hamburg-American line .steam- er DeutschUtnd ami tin.- French lino steamer La ended I his mor- ning with a decisive victory in 1'avoi of 'the German boat. The Deutseh- land was reported 1'Mdystone light- house, at the. eutnuuv Plymouth harbar, at ;a. m. today. Its of passage trcm New York to Ply- mouth Is five days, fourteen hours ami nine minutes, at an average speed of miles per hour. The .distance covered.vvas-3ip93 miles, La Provence wa.s reported by wire- less telegraph'when vessel was 50 miles south of Browhcad at o'clock yesterday niominp. The DeutschUuuJ. for Plymouth.' Cherbourg1, and Hamburg. cleared Sandy Hook.at.ll o'clock a. m. Thurs- day, 'June .28'. and La Pi'bvence, for Havre, followed. an hour and four- teen minutes later. Allowing for this difference in time the .DeutschUuul beats La Provence nearly eleven hours against the four hours claimed by the French steamer ou the iire'vious race. A. A HORSE S KICK MAY BE FATAL Matt. Zimmer of Gilbertville Went to Raymond to Attend Celebration. THE VICTIM OFTYPHOID Marie Wolf Died This Morning at Presbyterian Hospital After a Short Illness. .This morning at ten o'clock oc- urred the .dea.th of Miss Marie Wolf vho was taken to the Presbyterian lospital two weeks ago suffering from yphoid fever... Her heath was caused )'y pneumonia which followed the ever., Deceased. was born in Buchanan lOimty in July, 1SS4, and was thus just wenty-two years of age at the time of ler death. She was, working at the lonie of Mrs. Harry Naunian, 215 Jef- erson street when she was taken ill and was removed June 20 to the hos- >ital where all possible was clone to Onquer the disease. But in vain for ineumonia set in and death soon.en- ued. Deceased leaves a father and nether, who live at Aurora, la., and h'r'ee brothers and three sisters to mourn her loss. Miss Elizabeth Krause, 122 Mobile street is her cous- n. The body Was taken to the under- aking parlors of O'Keefe and Towne, nit will be removed as soon as word is eeeived from her people. Her father s expected on tho afternoon, train and vill probably take-the body to her old tome for burial. Little Babe Dead. Mrs. Lampman has lost a little baby, list born. This woman will be re- membered as the one who deserted her our small children several months ago and the court had to look after them. She left here for a time and then re- .urned later, after the children had i.een put out. George Dies. George Selig died at ten o'clock this morning, at tne home of her brother, J. lelig. 225 Courtlandt street, o'f dropsy and heart trouble. Deceased leaves a vife, two sons and four daughters. He was born May ]0. 1S5C. The body was aken to the undertaking parlors of iileman Gindi. where they will re- main until tomorrow morning when .hey will be taken to Frederickshurg where the funeral will take place ou Saturday. Deceased was a member of the Modern Woodmen fof America. MUST STOP THE DISORDERS Czar Takes Unusual Step to Stamp Out Sedition in the Army. The Massacre in Bialystok Was Deliberately Planned. THE CHOLERA The Situation in Philippines Im- proved. Washington [By Associated Press.] Manila, July cholera situ-i ition is improved. "The, authorities believe they have the situation under cpntroi. Two Americans died yes- Lerday from the disease, A War Ri'Hort. Washington, D. C., July war department was, adVised today rolilic slaughter. The deadly toy pis- ,ol followed as the instrument of leath, but its harvest Simply was -lawn, and will IK; reaped in tlifi next ,wo or threo weeks from lockjaw. LIVES WERE LOST Several Persons Killed by Collapse of a Floating Dock. [By Associated Press.] Omaha, JCeb., .July more bodies, four women and an unidenti- Icd man, were recovered from Lake Manawa, where last night over a hun- dred persons were precipitated into :he water from a lloating dock. Eight persons were injured and six ire. missing. Weighted with too many people, a floating dock at Lake Manawa, where most of the -Council Bluffs people .vere celebrating, collapsed last night and precipitated about 100 people ntci the water. The water was shal- low at the point of the collapse and ould be waded by a child. Tiift'g.-irC Answers. [By French Licks Springs, Ind., July 5. Taggart, chairman of the democratic national committee, to- day said regarding the demand of .the New York World' that lie resign tho chairmanship: "The World has been imposed upon by scandalous publications ot: a newspaper whose editor is my personal enemy. There has been no raid on French Lick Springs hotel, nor Such thing thought of save by Hearst. The proposition that J resign Is preposterous." Miaa Florence Hetta returned for Ihe summer vacation from 'her school duties douncil Bluffs. MET DEATH IN CRUMRINE LAKE Two Boys Drown While Parents Look Helplessly On. Leo Hollar Pulls Would-Be Rescuer to Bottom. Sad Ending of Family Reunion and Picnic. Bodies Recovered. In an endeavor to save Leo Hollar; 17. who yesterday afternoon dived into 11' feet of water in Crumrine Lake and was unable, to swim, Howard Perry, 22, his companion, was clutched by the drowning lad and both sank to the bottom In plain view of their horri- fied parents who stood on the bank. The young' men were in a boat about 5i> feet from the shore. The accident was witnessed by the intimate relatives of both boys and S, Sine, of 1245 South siveet and W. C. Frehse and son, of 1241 South street. They fished in the Cedar river and then came to the lake to try their luck. Both boys were talking in loud tones in the boat and were in full view of the parties on the bank. Hollar pro- tested that he could not swim and Perry was heard to remark, "Just dive oft, that's all." Young Hollar dived and when he came to the surface floundered about and shouted for help. They had been making so much noise before that no attention was paid to his call by those on the bank. Perry, however, jumped in and swam to the side of his com- panion. Upon reaching him Hollar clung to him in such a manner that Pfcrry was unable to swim. Then be- gan a death struggle between a drown- ing boy and his would be rescuer. Hol- lar's grasp was the "death grasp and they both sank to the bottom. to Kescne. Sine and Frehse kicked off their shoes, took off their coats and swam to the boat. Tliey dived a few times in an attempt to bring the boys to the sur- face but could not locate the bodies. They rowed to shore and secured a long rake. After dragging for thirty minutes Perry's body was recovered. An attempt was made to resuscitate him. Another hour and a half s with a long line, rigged with "hooks ami weights, was necessary before Hollar's body was brought to the surface. AVonien Crazed. The boy's parents paid little atten- tion to them until -they saw them struggling in the water and go under. The men stood on the1 bank and star- ed, helpless. Mrs. Hollar repeatedly fainted after being revived. Mary, a younger sister of Perry's, attempted to plunge into the lake and had to be forcibly restrained. Mrs. Perry was tunned and it was some time before he could be made to comprehend that her son had been drowned. I-Joys Were Fawners. Leo Hollar was born upon the farm where his parents now live, three and a half miles southeast of .Raymond, in Cedar township. He is survived by his father, mother, and two sisters, Grace and Eva. Howard Perry was born in Madison county, N. Y. His'parents moved to Iowa several years ago. He is sur- vived by liis father, mother, two sis- ters, Mary and Mrs. -Adel Ackleman and a brother, Judson. The bodies were brought to Kis.tr ncr's undertaking parlors where they will lie today. The double funeral will be held at the Methodist church at, tomorrow morning at 11 o'clock. Rev. Lusted officiating. Bur- ial will take place in the cemetery in Poyner township, near Raymond. The'two bereaved families and M.r. and Mrs. Ackleman were picnicking at the lake when the drowning occurred. The two boys went swimming' and re- ceived slight attention. J.Mr. Hollar Grief Stricken. When asked the age of his boy at the undertaker's today, Mr. Hollar said dazedly, "I don't know for sure, I am all confused." He became more animat- ed after talking a few minutes. When- asked whether or not his boy was working out he said rather proudly, "My boy never worked a day in Ms life for anyone else. He is working for me just like Perry's boy. Yes, he was still going to school." Mr. Perry was more calm and talk- ative. He said, "I didn't see very much. From what others tell me J. think they would both have gotten out all right if Leo hadn't clung to my boy. Yes. my boy has been near the water a good deal and was a good swimmer." The Crumrine Lake is but a few hundred feet from the Cedar River on the west side. Teh lake is about 11-2 miles northwest'of Washburn, Coroner is Called: Coroner Edward L.' Rolfe, while attending the races yesterday after- noon, was called to investigate this drowning. He viewed the remains at the undertaker's. No inquest will be held. HUXGAUTANS ARRESTED. Arc Suspected of Causing a Wreck iu Which Thirteen Were Killed. Associated Press.] AHoonn, July Hun- garians, brothers, were arrested to- iy charged, with causing a wreck Tuesday night, when a runaway car killed thirteen persons near Portage- muck Boonq, la-., July of brolun riut tt Story City. Two deicthn PtpnttiA and n score SIcK. S-.iKVtiy lion Is Uktri to prtTMt UM spread of the   

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