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Waterloo Evening Courier Newspaper Archive: April 11, 1917 - Page 1

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   Waterloo Evening Courier And Waterloo Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - April 11, 1917, Waterloo, Iowa                              THE RECOGNIZED WANT AD PAPER OF WATERLOO AND WATERLOO DAILY REPORTER Chicago, April Partly- cloudy in ndrth; probably unsettled In southern portion tonight and Thursday; cooler tonixht in east and central por- tions; warmer Thursday In extreme west portion. 18S8. 1863. ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE. A T E'R L 0 O IOWA, K 1) N K S D A V A P U I L E L V E P A G E S PRICE THREE CENTS. Gigantic War Loan Before House; Conscription Fight Ahead E IMS NSIST ON GALL BRITISH SPEED IN BATTLE OF ARRAS SURPRISES TEUTONS Sherman Introduces for Million Army: Resolution Wilson Urges Compulsion. 5 BILLION BOND ISSUE BEFORE THE LOWER HOUSE Prompt. Approval of Measure Is Will Provide Am- ple Funds for War. Big Guns Smashed Before They Could Be Demolished by Fire Thou- sands of Prisoners Bands Play as Troops Push For- ward. Old Glory Flies on Western Front Washington, D. C., April The army appropriation bill, car- rying for the existing regular army, was passed today "by the senate, amended so that it becomes immediately available. Washington, D. C., April A resolution authorizing the pres- ident to call for volun- teers was introduced today by- Senator Sherman, Republican, and laid on the table at his request without debate. Washington, D. C., April The war financing bill, providing for in bonds and in treasury certifi- cates, was unanimously reported for passage today in the house by the ways and means committee. President Wilson went to the house of representatives today for conferences Speaker Glark and other leaders ou the war. pro- gram.1- Representative Kitchin. assured the president the bond bill would (From a. staff correspondent of the Associated Press.) British Headquarters in Prance (via April speed and power of the British assault, in what will probably be known in his- tory as the'battle of Arras, seem to havfe thoroly surprised the Germans. So much so in fact that their usual retaliatory artillery fire has been ab- solutely negligible the last two days. This is partly due, of course, to the number of guns captured, to which must be added the number knocked out by the British artillery before the actual assault began. It is also due to the fact that the Germans have been too busy trying to get their re- maining guns away from immediate danger to bother firing them at the enemy. In a German, artillery posi- tion east of Arras, known as Battery valley, could be seen the remains of 24 field pieces today. TRENCHES BADLY BATTERED A trip over the newly-taken lines revealed a condition ot trenches closely approximating those recently evacuated by the Germans in the val- ley of the Somme. Many dugouts remained with only damaged portals but the trenches, including all com- munication lines, have been unmerci- fully battered about. So successful was the artillery bar- rier set up by the British back of the German lines that some ot the Ger- man prisoners reported they had been without food supplies for four days. The barbed wire Ottawa, Onf., April J stars am! stripes wont into buttU: (ot- the first time in the (luring, the recent entente storming; of Vlmy in JhYuuce, according: to an. official dispatch received here today from Canad- ian army headquarters in Eurojxj. "To a younji Texan who came to Ontario to euli.st, and is now lying wounded in the hos- the dispatch reads, "be- longs the honor of first carrying the American flag into battle in (he European war, into which the United States, as a belligerent, lias just entered. He went up to the assault at Tlielus carrying; the stars and stripes ou his bayonet and fell thus." March hi Clintons Loyalty Parade Clinton, la., April ing for Battery A. Iowa Field Artil- lery, was given new impetus today as I a result of Clinton's "loyalty" de- i monstration yesterday afternoon, in which between and men, women and children, of all national- i itics in the city marched in a pro- j cession two miles in length, and i joined in a great patriotic massrueet- ing. Twenty thousand spectators lined the two and a half miles of the line of march. Every marcher car- ried an American flag and the city was thoroly decorated with the na- tional colors. The columns -were broken at intervals by six bands and 15 patriotic floats. LOMTYQRr BIG BULL! Belgian and American Envoys Exchange Compliments in Paris Waterloo Plans Finest Demonstra- tion in State for Paul Re- vere Anniversary. BRITISH ME I BIG IMS OPEN BASEBALL IN SPITE Maj. Gen. Wood Tosses Out Ball in New York; 0 wners Look for Good Business. GRAND PATRIOTIC PARADE TO FEATURE CELEBRATION Speakers to Appeal to Youth to Answer Country's Call; Don Red, White and Blue. Paris. April 11.--The entrance: of tho United Suites into tin: war was celebrated last night hy a dinner ou by tlio oxeculivo committee of tho America n relief Hearing house-, at which representatives of all the al- lied nations were present. II. Her- man Hiirjes presided. Mr. Hnrjes. alluding to (he immense satisfaction felt by Americans in TarlH ut the :u> complisliment of an act. they had wo passionately desired, said: "We hnvo had and happily still have at tho head of our government, a man who has inspired us with the greatest admiration and the moat complete confidence, a man who watches over the deslinies of oui country with a conscience and a clearness of judgment equal to any trial we have known." Mr. I-larjc.s spoke with much feel- ing of American admiration foi France and of the joy Americans 11GW UTEDDYSTONE, STLY GIRLS iavo in battling with France for the supreme ideas of law. justice and lib- rty. The company broke into fhcors as ho proposed health of President Poiiiraro. i'RIHUTK HV VIVIAN! I Minister of .Justin; Vivian! ex- pressed the gratitude of for tho ho.lp Klvcu hy the clearing house In relieving tho suffering anioiiK the French people. was followed by Twenty-Three Others Missing, 125 United Stales Ambassador who proposed this toast: "Little Helghim, whose; heroic army fought, like, the Spartan patri- ots of old at the pass of Thermopy- lae, tho able to defend but for a brief timr its territory, helped con- siderable." M. He. Broqneville, Belgian minis- ter, in reply said: "Gentlemen, let us bend very low before? great nation wlviih today gives humanity the most, beautiful and proudest spectacle it is possible to conceive." to 150 Injured, 8 Fatally; Some Blown in River. Gain Quarter Mile on Front; Berlin Reports Heavy Fighting. be passed Friday ctiltv. without diffi- The war department's plan for raising an army by selective con- scription was the principal sub- ject discussed at the conference. Both Mr. Kitchin and Speaker Clark told the president of oppo- sition in live house to conscription, but said they did not know how strong it was. The. president earnestly urged that the entire war department plan be accepted by congress. In- dications were that he would con- tinue to insist upon the war de- partment plan as .drawn, altho sentiment appeared to be develop- ing for putting a provision into the measure under which an effort would bo made first to raise the army by volunteers. Chairman Kitchin, introducing and reporting the bill-to-the house, an- nounced that it would be called up Friday for action. The report on the bill states that the committee "deems it advisable, to authorize the bond issue at this time in order to provide immediately ample funds to meet such expenditures as are authorized for the national security and de- fense." Interest is not to exceed 3J per cent and the bill leaves the denom- inations of the bonds to the discre- tion of the secretary of the treasury. If at any time prior to Dec. 31. 191S, a subsequent series of bonds are is- sued at a higher rate of interest, honds issued under authority of tho protecting the German, positions were obliterated and only stray strands could be seen here and there on the first line. The thoroness "with'which the wire cutting, was out by the artillery was a big-factor in ac- celerating the speed of the infantry in the attack. BANDS ACCOMPANY ADVANCE The zest of offensive warfare could be felt in all parts of the British front today. Troops were swinging forward with bands playing gay tunes. The Scotch troops, behind their pipers, were particularly pic- turesque, for not even their vicissi- tudes of nearly three years of war have caused them to discard their kilts. Out over the newly-won ground airplanes were'scouting while beneath them were tanks at rest. The tanks had done splendidly thru- out, especially in attacking strongly wired points with which the artillery had not dealt. Some German, anti- tank guns were captured. Machine guns and trench mortars were taken in such large numbers that they have not yet been counted. CAVALRY TAKES HOWITZERS A cavalry corps had the unique Pittsburgh, Pa., April For tho first time in 20 years, the major league baseball sea- son opens today witliout Houus Wagner. Altho Wagner has re- fused to make any statement, his friemls that he has de- cided to retire from the irainc. distinction howitzers. of capturing two big They charged these guns in the open, killing several members of the crews before the others sur- rendered. A German motor trans- port column was captured intact. It had expected to meet German troops at a certain point British instead. but encountered The drivers said that when they left Douai there was no idea that the attackers had reach- ed so far. Thousands of German prisoners could be seen along the roads today. Some had little round caps and oth- ers were wearing the great coal scut- tle steel helmet. Altho the intense London. April British captured the village and heights of: Monchy-le-Preux early this morning, according to British official state- ment. The village of La Bergere was also captured and satisfactory pro- gress is reported being ma.de on oth- er parts jof the. battlefronL. ADVANCE QUARTER-MILE London, April troops yesterday advanced north at the vil- lage of Louveral, in the -direction of Cambrai, to the extent of a quarter of a mile along a front of yards and consolidated this gain during tho night, telegraphs Renter's corre- spondent from the British army headquarters in France. The message of the correspondent read: "North of the village of Louveral we pushed forward toward Cambrai to the extent of a quarter of a mile along a front of yards and con- solidated this gain during the night. "Northwards our patrols are ad- vancing to the belt of forest which runs along the whole of the steep eastern slope ot-Vimy ridge." "The splendid success of our of- fensive has created a most interest- ing situation and one which is fraught with tremendous possibili- ties. The enemy has been forced back upon the pivot of his previous retreat in a manner which creates a dangerously sharp salient at this spot. "Indeed, a glance at the map sug- gests that there is a distinct out- flanking of the German northern pivot as it existed before the present fighting." FIGHT ON CAM BRAT ROAD Berlin (via April Since early morning today, says the German official statement, fighting between the British and German forces developed on both sides of the Arras-Cambrai road and between Bullecourt and Queant. The German statement adds that fighting activity in a limited area act may be convertible into bonds bearing the higher rate. ARMY STEAK J38.OOO Washington. D. C., April ports on recruiting reaching the war department up to today indicate that the regular army will soon reach its peace strength of enlisted men. and until the president issues an order regiments cannot be brought up to war strength nor can new units be formed. Work on the army reorganization bill continued to- day by the house military committee, which arranged to hear Secretary- Baker, Maj. Gen. Scott, chief-of staff, and Brig. Gen. Crowder, judge advo- cate general, again in explanation of the administration plan. The senate expected to reach a vote today on'.the army appropriation bill which failed to pass at the last session. BOND ISSUE APPROVED Washington, D. C., April administration bill authorizing 000.000.000 bond issue, of which will be loaned to the entente allies, was laid before the house today as approved by the ways and means committee with prospects of prompt approval by congress. The bill also contains a provision living the secretary of the treasury cold continues only a few had over- coats. They are a docile lot and somewhat surprised their captors by carefully sorting themselves into their respective units before being registered and temporarily caged. Smaller cages were provided for'tbe officers. Four of the latter have been in furious rage ever since they were taken. They were in a for- ward observation postal they said ajid saw the inFantry coming back from their front line but had no idea that they were actually retreating. Their anger was due to the failure of these troops to give them warning so that they, too, could flee. New York, April the national safety valve for pent-up enthusiasm and tense nerves, took the field today before the nation at war. Tho approval of the military authorities is evidenced by the fact that Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood wjll open the American league season, here by tossing out the new hall "at the Polo grounds. National league games are sched- uled at Chicago, Cincinnati, and' Brooklyn. The opening game at Bos- ton with New York in this league wag declared off because the grounds are covered with snow. The season in the American league will start with games at St. Louis, Detroit, Phila- delphia, and New York. The weath- er promises to be generally fair but temperatures remain too low for ideal.baseball conditions. Club owners expect a fairly pros- perous season, but admit that re- ceipts and attendance probably will be cut by the war. They are encour- aged, however, by the fact that the game flourished during the Spanish- American war and that the Interna- tional league games In Canada last summer were well attended. CHICAGO OPENS SEASON Chicago. 111., April ma- jor league baseball season of 1917 was inaugurated here today by the Chicago and Pittsburgh teams of the national league, an added attraction being a parade on the field before the game of several companies of nation- al guardsmen.-headed by the brass band from the "'great lakes naval training station- The Chicago Federation of Musi- cians made a protest to Capt. W. A. Moffett. commandant at the naval training station, against the appear- ance of the sailor band in the park. Waterloo will commemorate the anniversary of Paul Reverc's famous rido with a big patriotic demonstra- tion at the Armory next Wednesday evening. Just 142 years after tlic Boston patriot rode thru the country making his appeal to patriotic cit- izens to take up arms in defense ol" the country, prominent speakers will appeal to patriotic young men in thifl vicinity to answer to the coun- try's call to arms. .MOXST13R DEMONSTRATION Mayor W. R. Law has completed arrangements for tho use of. the Armory and will name a committee to take charge of the plans for the evening: within a short time. This committee will meet this week to ar- range for a monster parade, speakers and other preliminary plans. Efforts will be made to make this the biggest patriotic demonstration held in the state. All patriotic or- ganizations will be invited to par- ticipate, while school children, fra- ternal organizations and similar or- ganizations will be invited to assist in making the patriotic demonstra- tion a success.1 AWAKEN PATRIOTISM purpose of tho meeting is not man TO IS FBBSTBITIO Blaze Extinguished Before Seri- ous Damage Is Done; Two Strangers Sought. WILL FOLLOW BRAZIL IN Explosion of Bomb by Time Clock Blamed; Perpetrator Died With Victims, Thought. only to urge young men to enlist, but it is being called to awaken cit- izens :to the patriotic duty which they owe their country. Efforts will be made to have prom- inent military and naval men present to explain the needs of the country in that- line, while others will point the way for all to assist the govern- ment in this crisis. It is possible arrangements will be made for a reproduction of Paul Re- vere's ride, while other patriotic fea- tures are being planned. Nearly every city in Iowa has held or will'hold patriotic demonstrations and local members of patriotic or- ganizations believe that Waterloo can surpass all other cities in a dem- onstration of this kind. "Waterloo is one of .the. few cities in Iowa having two companies in the Iowa national guard, while scores of young, men from this vicinity have enlisted in the regular army and navy during the.past few months. AVJXJ.I DECORATE CITY Efforts are made to have the city decorated with the national colors and business houses will be urged to display American flags not only on this occasion, but every day during the present crisis. Clinton, la., April surrounds a fire discovered late last night In the armory of Battery A, First Iowa field artillery. In tho Clin- ton coliseum. The fire was extin- guished before material damage had been done. Discovery of the blaze was made by a national guardsman, confined In the hospital section of the armory, who left the building temporarily. Returning he was 'halted by two strangers, but eluded them, and pro- ceeded to tho building, where- ho found n. fire had been kindled evi- dently but a few moments before. The armory was placed under guard for tho night find efforts are being made to locate ,The strangers who stopped the guardsman. Chile May Also Sever Relations, Rio Janeiro Thinks; Uru- guay Stays Neutral. Rio Janeiro, April is ex- pected in diplomatic circles here that other South American nations will soon, follow tha .-example of Brazil in severing relations with Germany. The Chilean minister is continuing Chester, i'n.. April explosion -was I he result ot a dhi- bolft-al plot conceived in the.de- tfcncruto mind of a demon hiunan jiuiso, derlarcd a high of- ficial of the Kihlystoiie Ammuni- tion corporation toihiy. H.o. s.wi i lint for obvious reasons he rould not permit the use of his This official said that'In- vestigation concluded this after- noon showed that a bomb manu- factured from a shell in the plant, by one ol' th'e employes hiu.l caused yesterdiiyN explo- sion anil the loss of at least 1 1C lives. Probe Attempt to Blow Up Bridge CONVICT ESCAPES JOMET; THREATENS JUIX5ES' LIFE lola, Kan., April and railroad officials continue here today their investigations of the activities of the four men arrested under the Atchison. Topeka Santa Fe rail- road bridge near here last night and who were alleged to have been carry- ing large quantities of nitroglycerine. The police continued to seac.cn for two other men who were believed to have escaped last night when the au- thorities approached the bridge. Women's Clubs in Biennial Session Chicago. April Murphy north of the river Scarpe yesterday at Givencby-en-Gohelle, Farbus and Fampoux, effected no change in tho situation. Yesterday afternoon, the German announcement declares, the British, after violent artillery firing, brought forward strong forces on both sides of the Arras-Cambrai road for fresh attacks, but they were repulsed with heavy losses. BIG AKTIbTyERY BATTLE Paris, April artillery fighting continues over the front, be- tween the Somme and the Oise." says today's official communication. The probable battery selections for I also known as "Jack" King and as today were Vaughn and Elliott for I "Patsy" King, sentenced to the state Chicago and Mamaux or Cooper and penitentiary for a term from one C. G. Holden Gets Army Commission (CONTINUED ON PAGE SIX) Washington. D. C.. April lowans were given appointments as commissioned offi- cers of the United States army today. They are: Clinton G. Holden. Waterloo, ap- pointed captain quartermaster's re- serve corps; Edgar Davis. Villisca. major In quartermaster's reserve corps; First Lieut. Charles W. Gal- lagher, Company A, engineers, Iowa national guard, appointed second lieutenant in regular army, and as- signed to Fifth field artillery. Congressman Green was.reappoint- ed today as a member of the ways and means committee, the most powerful committee in the house, re- taining his place as "fourth ranking minority member. BELGIAN RELIEF WORKER GETS TREASURY POSITION Washington, D. C.. April Oscar T. Crosby, of Warrenton, Va., was today appointed assistant secre- tary of treasury. Mr. Crosby was re- cently connected with the American Commission for Relief of Belgium and in charge of the work in Bel- gium and northern France. RIOTS IN BULGARIA; MANY KILLED BY CAVALRY Fisher for Pittsburgh. ST. LOUIS AT CINCINNATI Cincinnati. O.. April St. Louis and Cincinnati National league clubs opened the season here today. Meadows for the visitors and Mitchell for the locals probably will be the opposing pitchers. ATHLETICS MEET SENATORS Philadelphia. Pa.. April Washington and Philadelphia met in the opening game of the American league season here today. The op- posing batteries probably -will Bush and Srhang for the AthlctiYp and Gallia and Henry for the Sena- tors. DETROIT OPENS SEASON Detroit. Mich.. April and Cleveland today opened the sea- son. James and Stanage was the prob- able battery selection for Detroit and Bagby and O'Neill for Cleveland. SOX AM) BROWNS CLASH St. Louis. Mo.. April Chi- cago and St. Louis teams of the American league are scheduled to open the baseball season here this afternoon. Batteries as announced i last night were: Chicago. William? and Schalk; St. Louis, Hamilton and' Hale. year to life escaped today from the Joliet prison by climbing a 20-foot wall. Wrhen he was sentenced two months ago by Judge David M. Broth- ers on conviction for robbery he swore vengeance in court and threat- ened to escape and kill Judge Broth- ers. A deputy sheriff has been de- tailed to guard the judge. HERE'S GOOD NEWS. LADIES: COLD STORAGE EGGS GONE. New Orleans, La., April servation and education formed fea- tures of the discussion at the session of the biennial council' meeting of the General Federation of Women's Clubs here today. Miss Mary E. Parker of Cleveland, chairman of the federation's educa- tional department spoke, on the ed- ucational needs of the country, urg- ing more public schools and increased support for them in cities and rural districts. Mrs. John Dickinson Sher- man of Chicago led the discussion on conservation. his conferences with Dr. Lauro Mul- ler, the Brazilian foreign minister, CtiEER FOR TUB ALLIES Rio Janeiro. April demonstrations are growing .vol- umw thruout the city. The flagV of the entente .uro viaiblo everywhere and tho streets are pa- raders France ant1 land and sliouting "Down witJa Xier- many." The crowds In front of German establishments and hoot. H is said that the majority of the Herman ships which were seized had been wrecked by their crews. ARGENTINA TO ACT Washington, D. C., April official advices announcing that Bra- zil had decided to break off diplo- matic relations with Germany and that Argentina would support the po- sition of the United States in'refer- ence to Germany were received here early today. Brazil's action occasioned no sur- prise in official and diplomatic circles here as such a. course had been ex- pected. In the caso of; Argentina, however, it was not made clear whether her step meant that she would merely break relations or de- clare war. URUGUAY NEUTRAL Montevideo. Uruguay, April The Uruguayan government today Is- sued a decree of neutrality in the war between the United States and Germany and between Cuba and Ger- many. GERMANY SAYS LITTLE Copenhagen (via April Chester. Pa., April lists of the fatalities from thaexplos-" ions yesterday at the shrapnel load- ing plant of the Eddystone Ammuni- tion corporation at North near here, place the number of dead at 116. the majority of them girls and young women. Between 125 and 150 men, women and girls were injured, eight being so burned and torn by shrapnel fragments that death was momentarily expected. T.wentyrtnree others employed in the, structure, which was blown 'to missing. Some of the victims, company of- ficials believe, were blown into the Delaware, river; so that an exact cal- culation of the death list may never be possible. After making a careful: investiga- tion, W. M. Wilhelm, general man- ager of the munitions plant, said this afternoon that 11G are dead as a re- sult of yesterday's explosion. Forty- six dead have been identified but the remaining so bad- ly mutilated that Identification is al- most impossible. Between and 60 injured persons remain in the hos-f pitals and of these eight are so seri- ously hurt that they may die. CONVINCED OF J'LOT President Alba B. Johnson, or the Baldwin Locomotive Works, changed his theory that the Eddystone explo- sion was due to an accident after a visit today to the plant. He now agrees with Samuel M. Vauclai'n, president of the Eddystone Ammuni- tion corporation, that plotters caused the explosion. "Altho we have only circumstan- tial evidence, Mr. Johnson said, looks as if some one touched off a bomb or a time clock with an explo- sive attached. I have become con- vinced, after a talk.with the Eddy- Guards With Families Must Quit Service German press has so far passed over the South American sit- uation almost Avithout comment. Dis- patches regarding the possibility of Brazil and other Latin-American re- publics joining the allies are given as little prominence as possible. Suspect Bomb in 2 Elevator Fires London. April in sev- eral towns in Bulgaria is reported in a Reuter dispatch from the French headquarters on the Macedonian front. In Sofia German cavalry is said to have charged the rioters, oc- casioning many casualties. In some cases, the dispatch reports. Bulgar- ian, troops have taken sides with the manifestants. Washington, D. April Practically the entire stock of eggs held in storage thru the winter was Chicago, guardsmen April 11. National who have families de- Minneapolis. Minn., April vestigation of the fire which destroy- ed two elevators here Monday night and damaged three others, was push- ed rapidly today by federal authorl- ies to determine whether the fires pendent on them must leave the ser- starting at almost the same were of incendiary origin. time. Small exhausted March 1. only 3.200 cascn j issued by Maj. Gen. Thomas H. Bar- otniner _ _ _a of metal, resembling the rem- vice. regardless of any desire to re- {nants of a bomb, were found in the dnty, according to an order remaining from the, five million cases held last Aug. 1, the federal bureau of markets announced today. WILSOX MNER TORPEDOED; AMERICAN ABOARD SAVED. Washington. D. C., April Sinking of the Wilson liner Salmo. having aboard one American, who was was reported to the state department today by Consul Frost at Queenstown. ry. commanding the central depart- ment. ruins of one elevator and turned over to the autnorities. WAR INSURANCE BILL. Albany, X. Y.. April bill j to permit fire insurance companies to write policies covering loss from Harvester, Mild Havana lOc Cigar, t bombardments was signed by Gov. NOTED POLITICIAN DEAD. Chicago. April Pease, for years a well known leader in Re- publican state and city politica, died today at St. Luke's hospital after an illneBs of nearly a year. He is sur- vived by a widow and three children. Smoke Diamond Joe. 5 cent cigar Good to the last puff. (advertisement) (advertisement) If, thru error of the carrier boy or other cause, this paper should not be delivered at your home by 6 o'clock, please phone 3230, a copy ot paper will be sent. After o'clock, tele- nhone No. 2. Whitman today. The measure is a part of the state's preparedness leg- islation. BEGIN GRAIN PROBE....... Chicago. April federal grand jury's investigation of grain prices began today. A truck load of books and other records were taken into the crind jury room. Germany Stops Mail and Wires to U. S. Berlin, April 10 (via London, April has stopped all mail service both direct and indirect between this country and the United States. Telegraph service also has been stopped. Farm Talk Plans to Increase Crops St. Louis, Mo.. April of inducing farmers by a campaign of publicity to increase their acre- age of grain and to produce a normal crop of cotton and other staples in order to-tneet the demands that prob- ably will be made on the United States while a state of war exists with Germany, are being discussed by editors and publishers of farm journals, in session here today. The meeting was called by Secre- tary of Agriculture Houston. Dele- gates from journals representing more than readers have accepted the invitation. stone officials that the catastrophe could not have occurred by accident. The Chester police have released two suspects, father and son. named Cohen, arrested last night. The Chester police say that if the explo- sion was the work of plotters, who- ever caused it must have died with, the rest. Samuel M. Vauclain. head of- the munition company, said: "We are unable to account for explosion in any way other than the act of some maliciously inclined person or per- sons." FOUR PROBES UXDER WAY Four separate investigations were begun, federal, state and municipal and an inquiry by company officials. Gangs of laborers, guarded by pickets, worked until an early hour today clearing away the wreckage of the "F" building. Work was resum- ed as usual today in all departments except the box. loading and shell base departments which were housed In the ruined building. The plant -will be in complete operation on April 24, it was announced. San Felice, a Great 5c Cigar. WEATHER FORECAST NORTH- EASTERN IOWA; SO HOURS FOLLOWING 7 A. M. TOD AIT. U. S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau forecast until 7 p. m. Thursday: The Nebraska area of low pres- sure has advanced to the upper lakes region, attended ty cloudy er without mu ch precipita- tion. Another disturbance -.jait beginning has west gulf states causinj ako-wersV The temperature has risen ii the east and south and fallen iu the northwest. An area of moderately h! gh pressu re Vi th cooler er from th e n orth west vance- to this section .night or Thursday.   

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