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   Waterloo Evening Courier And Waterloo Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - February 17, 1916, Waterloo, Iowa                              WATERLOO EVENING COURIER AND REPORTER, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1919. WATERLOO KVENIXG OOUK1EII AND DAILY REPORTER. THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 17. 1916. Member Associated I'rcss. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Published Dally Except Sunday By H. HAKTMAX CO.. 509-J1-13 West Park Ave., Tel. 3330. Joiir. C. Hartmun, President and Editor. A. Peterson. s-ec.-Treas. and Mgr. by currier, 10 cents: per year, mail, outside city. ta.OO. Entered at poKtofflce, Waterloo, Iowa, as ?ocond-clasi> matter. Double bor.u flile circulation of any othpr daily In Waterloo trading district. Advertising m.idu known on application. Prices Mibject to change without notice- "Want" ads 1 cent a word. No ad for less than 15 Social y.-lcc on It Is not intention of the ninnnKe- metit to insert fraudulent or advertisements aisd right is reserv- ed to eliminate such imrts copy as r.re not admlsE.-ible ur.rtor the rules of the-. publisher. Specified kinds of ad- vertising are rejected altogether.______ New vork. Philadelphia and Chicago offices: Hasbrook, Story Brooks. Msrs. his strength Is recognized by the east- ern conservatives. WOME.V AXn .HTSTICK. During tlie progress of the trial Mrs. Meyer nt Wintered, a corres- pondent noted that the women spec- tators were far more vindictive to- wards tho defendant than were the rueo. They were free to express their conviction as to her guilt and to demand her severe punishment. The men were more sympathetic und reserved In their opinions. This Is merely an example of the traditional RANN-DOM Howard LRann TWIN S 'Twins are a soul-satisfying form of. epidemic which causes envy to spring i up in tho minds of the neighbors and Blc to spring up In the home. consist of two children who look implacability of woman towards her can tell them; lapart, unless thev are branded with) own sex. It seems to be a biological rlbb ROOT'S PHILIPPIC. The address of Mr. Root before the New York state convention of Republicans is generally regarded as sounding the keynote of tho national campaign. It is also looked upon in some quarters c.s the announcement ot Mr. Root's own personal platform. In this speech, which may be ac- curately described as a philippic against the Democratic administra- tion, Mr. Root, tho diplomat, towers above Mr. Root, the politician. So militant it is in tone that one would almost believe the address was writ- ten''by Theodore Roosevelt. In its vigorous and unsparing arraignment of the president's foreign, policy, Mr. Root's pronouncement is worthy of the colonel at his best. He assails Mr. Wilson's vaccinating attitude towards Mexico as having brought disgrace to the American name, as- serting: "For the death and outrage, tho suffering and ruin of our own brethren, the hatred and contempt for our country, and the dishonor of our name in that land, the adminis- tration at Washington shares respon- sibility with the inhuman brutes with whom it made common cause." Passing from this severe indict- ment, Mr. Root Is equally vindictive in his criticism of the administra- tion's handling of the situation grow- ing out of the European war and particularly the submarine question, declaring that "the policy of 'threat- ening words without deeds" has incurred the contempt of the warring powers and that "our diplomacy has lost its authority influence because we have been brave in words and irresolute in action." Like Colonel Roosevelt, Mr. .Root thinks the United States government neglected a solemn duty and "failed to.rise to the demands of a great oc- when it refused to protest against the German invasion of Bel- glum. He believes the administra- tion made a serious and almost fatal mistake when it failed to follow the example of the neutral countries of Europe and provide a strong military force to hack up American rights im- mediately following the outbreak of the -war. If this speech of Mr. Root is really voicing party sentiments, it is evident that the campaign is go- ing to be fought out largely on inter- national questions. Domestic issues will figure, certainly, but not to the extent they have In previous cam- paigns. The question of tariff will be vita! because of after-war com- mercial conditions, but preparedness and. a more vigorous foreign policy be the paramount issues. The Republican party is going to take a militant attitude in this campaign. Both Mr. Root's address and the re- cent ones of Senator Cummins indi- cate that the battle is going to be fought out along these lines. The Republican party under Mr. Tail was even more pacific than the Democrat- ic party under Mr. Wilson. But no pacifist is going to be considered for the Republican nomination this year. The party is going to stand for an adequate measure of preparedness and for a foreign policy that will se- cure a full measure of respect 'or the American flag ail over the world. It will be a policy that will make for peace without the sacrifice of honor or prestige. truth that women arc more severe in Judging their sisters ihan men ure towards members of their own sex. Should the woman jury become es- tablished In judicial procedure, it Is very likely that this fact will be recognized and that women defend- ants will refuse to be tried by a jury of their "peers." They will still prefer to appeal to tho sympathies of a. Jury of men. GUTTING A UXIOX DKi'OT. The thriving little city of Clar- ence, it has 660 population, having got tired of waiting for the North- western railroad to build n pnsaengor station proposes to build one itself and present It to the railroad com- pany. This suggests a means whero- by Waterloo may get that long-hoped- for union station. It will set a pre- cedent, that Is llkoly to meet the ap- proval of Impoverished railway di- rectors everywhere. most harrowing experiences in life is; for a husband to bo presented with [Kiir of twins and. after seeing tliatj they are properly labeled, discover; lliat his wife is color blind In both eyes. It is much easier to raise a pair of twins tliiin a filnglo twin, according to those who have tried both methods. One reason for this is that dual twins learn at an early ago to sine each other to sloop. When two en- thusiastic twin vocalists begin to en- gage in a duet, starting with a low, So much alike that nobody can tell them apart. twins In this world, there would he andante movement and working up fewer proud fathers trying to elude to a thrilling climax on high U-flat, tno ireful overdraft, they will appear to ho in a raost successful set of twins mood for the time being, but, if recorded In history Interrupted by a rude and twIiiK. Neither was the hand, will fall peacefully to sleep along toward sunrise. Most owners twins could be persuaded to go to the picture show or anywhere without LLVCOLX'S ANCESTORS. An Illinois patriotic organization is interested in tracing the ancestry of Abraham Lincoln. They think they have unearthed evidence that Lin- coln's grandfather was a soldier In the war of Revolution. But the great commoner would have been quick to discourage any such a move. He never went In very strong for an- cestors. Blue blood didn't count so much with Lincoln as did red-blood- ed Americanism. of twins grow impatient, however, tno other. Nobody" ever saw a and prefer to carry a twin on each! siamcso twln go himself with- out being followed at a respectful dis- tance by his brother. It must be de- pressing to be the brother of a Siamese twin, who is forever tagging one around and wearing the same colored necktie, and yet these twins earned a great deal of rnony and es- caped matrimony. Twins come to rich and poo'r alike, but It sometimes seems as if the poor had better luck In the draw. arm over the surface of a hardwood floor with cold, protruding feet. When twins grow to duplicate man- hood, they are a real blessing in the homo, as they can wear each other's clothes and go with the same glrli without danger of detection. The parents of twin daughters can buy foulard gowns and silk stockings In carload lots, and thus effect a ma- terial saving. If there were more The Norwich University Record, Northfield, Vt., has Issued a memor- ial number In honor of General Gren- ville M. Dodge, who graduated from the scientific department of that ir.- stiliuion In 1S51. It pnys a fine, tribute to the distinguished lowau as student, engineer, soldier and citizen. Norwich university, too, proudly claims General Grenville M. Dodge. CAMERON KNOW WHAT YOU WANT. JUmiiV GOJiS TO MAH'KBT. 13obby Duck was a good llttlo fel- j low most of the time, but once In a i while he did like to .have his own way and did not want to mind his mother, who, of course, being older, was wiser as well. Madam Duck, Bpbby's mother, said one morning: "Bobby, I think you will have to go to market this morning, because I have a pain in my foot and cannot walk to town." Now, Bobby Duck was not glad that his mother had a pain in her. foot, not at all; but he was very glad he could go to market, because he knew he would have to go thru the woods, and Bobby.Duck thought he might have' an adventure. Bobby had heard of Mr. Pox and Old Black Wolf, who lived'in the woods, and he kuow he would bo braver than those who told stories of meeting these fellows and how frightened they had been of Old Black Wolf's Mr. Fox's big mouth. "I would not be thought-Bobby Duck. "I carry a gun and I would make those fellows run from me. I hope I meet one of them; or both would be'more fun." "Now, said his mother, as she gave lilni the market basket, "do not loiter, on. the way and, above all, do not talk-to anyone you cially In the woods. "You never saw Old Black Wolf or Mr. Fox, and they might talk to you so nice and sweet that you would think them the kindest creat- ures in the world, and not knowing what would happen to you." Bobby went to marjcei. and got all the nice things his mother told him to buy, and was on his way home, and still he had not met a single creature, and his gun, which he had brought with him under is jacket, was'still unused. "Good morning, my said someone, very sweetly. Bobby looked in the direction from which the voles came and saw a big black head and smiling face looking at him under a bush some distance "1 want a dark I heard a shopper say to a saleswoman the oth- er day. "Something in blue or "Qh, no, I don't >va.ut black, be- cause that's so unbecoming, nor blue, berauso my spring suit is blue." "Here's a very pretty little brown suit." The newspapers of the state are discussing tho question of Iowa's oldest barber. Des Moines claimed the honor for Jacob Schmltt who has followed the tonsorial art in that city. since 1SG4. It would be interesting to shift the argument to the state's oldest bartender if he hadn't left Jan. 1. The progressive town of Perry has issued, under the auspices of the Bureau of Commerce, an attractive illustrated brochure extolling the ad- vantages of Iowa in general and of Perry in particular. It says "Perry means "pros-Perry-ty." It is a clever and enterprising piece of work. young Philadelphia heiress who married Jean Harold Edward St. Cyr, of a famous French family, is seeking a divorce now that she has found that her husband is plain .Tack Thompson of Waco, Tex. There are so-ne folks who still believe there is BO.' ething in n name. "No. I don't want brown. I've just had a brown suit." The saleswoman twirled the reel around. "Grey or she sug- gested hopefully. "Mercy, said the shopper. "I detest grey, and green makes me look sallow." When I left the shop the sales- having ruiggeotecl wistaria and purple, and had them vigorously co-idemned as "too old" was looking hopeless and the customer was say- ing impatiently: "It does seem as if you might find something In this whole shop that I'd She Wanted a Color That Xover Was on Ijiuul or Sou. Doubtless, the saleswoman mlirht have "found something" if she could have produced a color that never was on land or sea. Otherwise her chances were small. On another occasion I heard a clerk who had evidently been suffer- ing from a similar' experience m ruur to a fellow worker, "She doesn't know what she does want." Unfor- tunately, the customer overheard and left the store indignantly. Bad sal manship? Yes, but can you much blame her? Think how many times a day she has to deal with this type the garment, and says with restless dissatisfaction, "No, that's not just what I want. Haven't you something The woman who knows what sue wants, but wants something almost Impossible, is another type that must be trying. For instance, she wants a 'blue light enough to bo becoming, but dark enough not to soil easily, and every blue that is light enough to be becoming is too light not to soil, and vice versa. AJI Evening Cent That Would Bo Nice for the- Morning. I once went'shopping with a wom- an who wanted a coat that would be suitable to wear for an evening coal and yet all right to wear in the morning when she went out with the baby. Every coat that was dressy enough for evening she objected to as too dressy to run out in, and every coat that would have been good for that latter purpose wasn't suitable for evening wear. Naturally! Of course there are many women Can't Stand the Work from the path. "Good said Bobby, am then he stopped, forgetting all about what his mother said about not loit- ering. Mr. Pox, for It was he, came toward Bobby and asked what he had in his basket. this that he almost forgot to be po- lite and reached ..toward Bobby's basket as if to take It.' Then he drew back anrj; said: really feel I should help you to carry such a heavy basket. You are such little fellow." "Oh! I am said Bobby Duck, puffing up as big as he could "and I am brave, too. See my and he threw back his coat so Mr ix could see he had one. Mr. Fox eyed the gun, as he di< not seem very pleased, either, so he asked to look at the gun, telling 3obby that it was very handsome.ant :io would like But what do'you think Mr. Fox did as soon' as gun in his hands? Why, .he just pointed it right at poor little Bobby Duck and told him to march ahead of him or he would shoot him. Now, do not be alarmed, my children, for you remember I told you at the be- ginning it turned out that Bobby Duck was not harmed, but he almost was. Poor Bobby Duck forgot all about being brave when wicked Mr. -Fox spoke to him in such a gruff voice and he marched along as he tO dO. Just as they reached "Mr." Fox's home and Mr. Fox was thinking he would have all the good things in the basket, as well as poor little Bobby Duck, someone came scamper- ing thru the bushes and there was a big dog from the farm over the hill. My, how Mr. Fox ran when he saw that dog and how the dog ran when he saw Mr. Fox running, but the danger was all over for Bobby Duck, and he picked up his gun, which Mr. off No matter how hard a man's work s he can enjoy it If he has a clear lead, a sound body and steady icrves. But lame, aching backs and 'jumpy" nerves make hard work larder. Often it's only weak kidneys. fThe work itself may bring kidney .rouble. Work that requires con- itant bending, reaching, stooping or Ifting strains the kidneys In time. 3o will jolting, vibration, dampness, sudden changes heat and cold, chemical fumes, or being always on one's feet. Kidney sufferers complain of be- ing tired all the lame In tne aiorning, dull and nervous; they have spells, darting pains. give up. Don't let gravel, dropsy or Bright's disci.se make a start. Help the kidneys. Use Doan's Kidney Pills, the kidney rem- edy that's praised everywhere. A Waterloo example: G. S. Payne, shoemaker, 721 Fow- ler St., says: "My work compels me to do a great deal of stooping and I thjnk that is what weakened mj kidneys and caused my back to ache Many times when I had been sitting down and then tried to get up, a harp pain caught me in the small of ny back and I could hardly move. The action of my kidneys was irregu- ar. I used one box of Doan's Kid- ney Pills with good results." "EveryPiclure Tells a Story" back aches every day." SHDNflf Price Foster-MilbuniCo.Props.BuffalpM Bobby told his he had been to market for his mother and had. cur- rants and raisins and sugar and spices and a bag of rice. Mr. Fox was so pleased to hear Pox dropped in his hurry, and waddled Bobby Duck for home. (Copyright. 191G. by the McClure News- paper Syndicate, New York City.) Tomorrow's Donkeys Hnvo Ixmg Ears." there will be in another year or measures for the public safety must be more rigidly enforced. Another Iclql keep his word by staying out of the wrestling game he would win a reputation, for stam- ina and r An elderly couple of Stanton, t" forestall secret wishes on the part of their heirs for their earlv death, de- cided to divide their estate while yet alive. Bin remembering the example r.f King Lear, they wisely retained a ICC-acre farm for their own use. of woman. Perhaps the shopper has some vague idea .that no prosaic concrete reality could possibly approach. Per- haps she expects her new suit to make her look entirely different, young if she Is old, handsome if she is plain, well set up if she has a poor figure. And when she looks in the mirror and sees much the same woman, she thinks it is the fault of to make one garment servo two pur- poses. These should make up their minds before starting out which Is tho more Important use and what> they will sacrifice. Know Appro.vitnntely What You Wnnt in Color, Price and Style. For the clerk's sake, for your own sake and your wardrobe's sake, make up your mind before you leave your house as nearly as possible what you want in color, style and price. Then tell the clerk these factors. Don't leave her to guess the price from your appearance and then blame her if she guesses too high or too low-. Don't force her to find out the color, and style you want by a long, toilsome process of elimination. Of course It Is her business as a saleswoman to help you make up your mind, but it is yours as an in- telligent woman to have a mind ready to make up. Right. Man in Proper; Place. Sioux City 'Tribune: House visited Great Switzerland and Germany; was..inter- viewed in each sai'd ab- solutely nothing in four languages. HEALTH TALKS BY OUTHSIE STCONNEIiIi, M. Director Waterloo Medical laboratory, Society. Questions of General Interest Per- taining to Hygiene, Prevention ot Disease and Sanitation Will Be Answerert In This Column When Space Will Permit. Individual Diseases Will Not Be Prescribed For Nor Will Diagnoses Be Made. Thomas A. Edison says he had as soon see a man with a revolver as a boy with p. cigarette and he favors strins-ont Inws to wipe out the evil. Mr. Kdisou certainly never got his s'art by Muokinp "coffin nnils." PEN'ROSK. The entrance of Senator Cummins Into the presidential race in Penn- sylvania has created a great commo- The Texnns p.ro strong for Colonel fnr ihc cabinet vacancy. Tho president has ;hus far made only two cabinet appointments from that state. to If the Iowa Democrats are going insist upon W. J. Bryan's going tion among the leaders of the Pen- rose organization, if we are to credit the statements uf the Washington political wizards. This state is credited with being the most power- ful stronghold of conservatism in the country. In fact it has been ed so impervious to progressive ideas! that politicians are astonished at the! boldness of the Cummins coup. Pen- rose is generally credited with hav- ing the strength of Gibraltar in Pennsylvania. Of course Mr. Pen- rose is not a candidate for the presi- dency himself, but the interests he serves are naturally not very enthus- iastic for Senator Cummins. They are doing their best to line up a can- didate In opposition to him and Phil- ander C. Knos, former secretary of Btate, is talked for this purpose. But the flurry he has created is a very 3ne compliment for the Iowa senator back into the hini secretary of war? y not make R'ith Cameron calls the man who a story a raconteur. Sometimes he is that and again ho is more or less of a nuisance. WHAT IOWA EDITORS ARE Up 1'urc Food Dubuque Times- Journal: Most people are ready to register a strong kick if they are served with a soiled plate or a dirty knife and fork In a restaurant or at home. But if the waiter be quick or the waitress passingly fair few pay anv heed to whether the hands that'serve their food are contaminated with disease germs or whether the person s'prving them Is of the type known to physicians as a "disease Patriot ism. Des Moines Capital: There is a peculiar sentiment in the United States in regard to patriotism. There are many citizens who BKKaiT'S DISEASE. Of the many structures in the body that are constantly working and being overworked, the kidneys oc- cupy a very important place. It Is mainly thrxi them that the substances which are of no value in the blood are got out of our body. The blood not only carries those things which help build up the tissues but it also car- ries away the waste materials that are formed. Consequently the kid- neys are always working, and fortu- nately for us they can accomplish a great deal when the necessity arises. Under certain conditions, however, trouble may occur. When a person becomes severely sick, the symptoms as we see them indicate that there They take no stock in it. They call it "hot air." They think it is a'nuis- ance to rise to their feet when the band plays the "Star Spangled Ban- ner." But let us remember that patriot- and gives off deadly germs but who to all appearances Is in perfect health. Realizing this danger to public health, Montclair, X. .1., of reform fame, now has hygienic housemaids. We nominate Claude Kitchin as secretary of peace in the president's kitchon cabinet. How -would Cummins and Weeks Co for a i 'mpromise ticket? example. For twenty-five years aft- er the war they held a majority of j g i A LINE 0' CHEEK EACH DAY 0' THE YEAK. ism is the foundation of good The board of health conducts exam- ship. A man who loves his country i and issues certificates of is liable to be honest in public office, i health to domestics. Handlers of Take the Civil war soldiers as an i food in stores are Included. Chicago also is awake to the dan- ;r and health officers there are the public offices. During that pe- i forcing restaurant proprietors to see riod there wore fewer defalcations j that employes undergo tuberculosis before or (tests. a man has! isn't It the logical way to back up fought for his country lie is too proud our pure food iaws? to betray it, in a financial sense, or in any, other way. A lack of patriotism means a lack of unity, and an absence of purpose. This country is so big that many mark and may become permanently damaged. r Instead of following acute attacks the kidney disease results from a chronic irritation due to the presence over long periods of poisonous sub- stances in tho blood. That is what is usually meant by Bright's disease and Is found In many conditions. It is a slow process, the secreting cells of the kidneys are gradually destroy- ed by a growth of -what'is similar to scar tissue. ,.A.s .the ...kidneys lose tneir power there is an increasing at- tempt on the part of the heart to force enough blood thru them to keep things going along. This throws more work on .the heart and it en- larges. In this .way each organ is over-taxed and altho nothing may happen for many years there comes a time when neither heart nor kidney can carry on their work and -.'the patient becomes very sick, .and'may die. At such a time as this the blood becomes filled with waste material .hat should he got out oE the body. There is an increase in the fluids in .he tissues, the eyelids, the face and he hands swell and finally all the issues of the body may he adema-' tons. If it is not stopped, the poisons effect the brain and the pa- ilent may die from uremia. Fortunately much may be done to prevent the occurrence of the at- 'acks even if the condition cannot be cured. The patient should avoid physical strains as much as possible, and any faulty habits of eating or drinking be corrected. Care should be taken to avoid getting chilled as that throws extra work on the kid- neys. The bowels should be kept well open and, under careful super- vision, certain drugs are useful in steadying the heart's action. By fol- lowing directions carefully many comfortable years may be ensured and the patient neither pain nor discomfort. are in that person's body some sub- stances that act as poisons. The kid- neys are called upon to become more active than ever, they perform an extra amount of work, and, as hap pens everywhere, work that is rushed is not done as well as work that is quietly attended to. The poison be so strong that in addition to the Compounded By Nature Bottled By Man West Baden Spradel Water is recognized as the Nation's greatest natural laxative It cannot, will not nauseate. It overcomes the worst' case of Constipation within an hour. WEST BADEN SPRUDEL WATER is unsurpassed for" .Colds, the Grippe, Headache, Stomach, Liver, Kidney and'Digestive Disturbances. It is excellent for Rheumatism, Obesity (and Nutritional Impairments. It is Nature's 100 Per Cent Laxative Water Small Bottles, 15c Large Bottles, 35c MV: It pays to read "Want Ads" in a wide-awake paper like the Evening Courier and Reporter. FRANK T. HARTMAN PHYSICIAN AXD than in any like period since. As a rule when By JOHX KEXnniCK BANGS. AS TO QVKSTIOXS. Punishing the (Juilty. Iowa City Citizen: A scutcncn of one year in the penitentiary was given a Powcshiek county atitomo- When it comes down to questions by which our minds are snen a rowesuieK countv auto people have thought that it would bnist who recklessly drove Into a take care of itself or that Providence standing at the side of a road and would do it. Tho present circum- stances have illustrated that these disease Itself vre may find an acute j (Special nephritis, or inflammation of the] kidney. This frequently happens in diphtheria and scarlet fever. The urine will contain albumin and blood and often is decreased in amount as the kidneys cannot do all that Is suddenly demanded. After such attacks the organs may recover entirely, become as strong ns ever and all go well. Sometimes, however, they may be injured perma- nently and remain less able than be- fore. Consequently if there are any more attacks of Infectious diseases the kidneys are not qxiite up to the matters are not true. while' Pllt lt tasked ever asked, tad it is significant as indicating that (Copyright, isie, McClure paoer into (he-public schools and help save I never bother over those that no ono'thc boys' Put U 'nto-tllc Political ______ 1T1H h f rt parties nnd help save the country. Pnt it into yor.r own !ife and more haniHly. live riously dealing out justice as it should he! A man driving an automobile lias no more right than an engineer driving a train to maim and kill people. If his own recklessness causes serious results he should be made to pay the full; penalty of the law. With "200 umy wuu jaromo unin.1 000.automobile ru.nr.lnpr IT, Trm-a-aa- K. w. Grovt is AN IMPROVED QUININE POES.HOTAFFECfTHE.HEAD Because of its toaic and laxative effect. LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE wilt be found betlcr than ordinary Quinine. Docs not cause nervousness, nor rlncinsr in the bead. Re- member, thercis only one "Bromo Attention to Gynecology and Obstetrics.) Corner Fifth and SInlberry Streets Opp.'East Side library. Phono 421 Office Hours: 2 to op. ni. Wednes- day and Saturday .Evenings, 7 to 8 Sundays 11 a., m. to l.p. rn. DR. C. L. CHAMBERS Suite 807-22 James HInck Bldir. With Drs. Alford and Bickley Practice Limited to Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. Hours: 9-12 a. m. 2-4 p. m. The eyes of the world are on Washington The nation's capital was never better worth visiting than now. Congress is in its most important session for years; social life is at its height. Stop off in Washington en route to New York v One to ten days stopover allowed on through tickets, not only at Washington, but" at Baltimore, Philadelphia and other important points exceptional advantage for busi- ness travelers. The Baltimore Ohio has been made Better Finer train service on better track and road- bed does not exist. The all-steel trains are the newest 1916 models and carry beautiful day coaches. The Pullman sleeping.cars are the very latest in every detail. Four splendid all-steel through, trains from Chicago daily The Interstate m.-- Tho New York p. m. The only solid trains direct to Washington nnd tho only ones equipped with compartment and observation sleeping cars. The WashinRton-New York a. m. The New York p. m. All trains leave Grand Central Station, Chicago, and leave 53d Street Station 23 minutes later. W. A. PRESTON. Trnvellne Pusscnzcr Ajrent, f 230 South Clnrk Street, Chicago, HI." Baltimore Sc Ohio Passengers Are Our Guests" Dr. Gen-it J. Bennett Physician and Surgeon. Phone Ofi. Obstetrics, Diser.ses of Women and Children. 705 Black Building. Hours: 10-12, .K5, 7-8. Sun.: 10-12. 1107 Grant Phone 1759. Cured in a few days withont a hospital sur- gical operation; no chloroform or ether used; no laying up; go about as you please; cnre guaranteed no pay unless cured. I treat all .diseases of. the rectum, both men and women; write for information. C. Y. CLEMENT, M. Good Block, Des Mbbes, Iowa. A Courier and Rerjorter Want Ad Will''Get Best Results.   

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