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Waterloo Evening Courier Newspaper Archive: February 17, 1916 - Page 10

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Publication: Waterloo Evening Courier

Location: Waterloo, Iowa

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   Waterloo Evening Courier And Waterloo Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - February 17, 1916, Waterloo, Iowa                              .10 WATERLOO EVENING COURIER AND REPORTER, Til IRS DAY, FEBRUARY 17, BASKETBALL NEWS OF THE SPORTING WORLD A THLETICS GREAT UHLAN RETIRED FROM RACE TRACK Declares Keokuk Franchise Transferred Before Annual Meet- City Delegates Allowed To Vote. Davenport, Feb. ap- pears to be a glaring discrepancy in the claims made by M. E. Justice, president of the Central association, in his feverish desire to invade Rock Island. Did you know, for instance, that the Keokuk franchise was transfer- red to Rock Island on Oct. 9? Well, it least, M, E. Justice claims it was in the letter which he recently wrote Garry Herrmann, chairman of the national commission. Now arises the knotty question. If the Keokuk franchise was shifted to the Islanders in October, wotlnhel was Keokuk doing at the Burlington meeting in January, when it posted its forfeit to retain membership in the Central Association, and to cast the tie vote for M. E.? (Waterloo and MarshalHown dele- gates, please rise! Thank you! Now answer the above question.) AVot's tlie Idea? Albert R. Tearney revealed some of the contents of Justice's letter to Herrmann when he paid his visit to Rock Island Monday. Mr. Justice makes some startling claims in that document. He says he purchased the right to the Rock Island territory early in September, that ME protec- tion money was forwarded to head- quarters, and that on Oct. 9 he trans- ferred the Keokuk franchise. Now. Just to freshen your mem- ory a bit let's review what happened last month. When the Contral asso- ciation held its mid-winter meeting in Burlington In January, a fight was made against the re-election of Jus- tice as president. Four clubs cast their ballots for Norton of Burling- ton. Justice had three clubs favor- ins him, but on the day the meet- ing, Keokuk surprised everybody concerned by posting its 5600 forfeit for a franchise, and then cast the tie vote for the Keokuk Kandldate. Justice-.then broke the tie by voting for himself. Waterloo and lered "Murder." Keokuk's presence in the Burlington meeting was simply a and that Justice dragged in his hum town just for the purpose of saving a joh for himself. There seemed to be some merit in the contention of the insurgents when It was announc- ed some days later that the Keokuk franchise had been shifted to Rock Island. Now, if the Keokuk franchise was transferred on October 9, what was Keokuk doing at the Burlington meeting, and why was it necessary to again transfer the franchise? Didn' the first operation take? It look? like a raw political move to deceive the National commission, and there are some bears over on the C. A. beat who will make an awful roar when they learn thai Keokuk hasn't been in the league since October fl. San Francisco, Cal., Feb. K. G. Billings, the famous New York millionaire and sportsman, has con- Irmed the reports received here from time to time, that Uhlan, the reatest trotter the light harness world has ever known, has been defi- nitely retired from further speed tests. According to Mr. Billings, who Marshalltown hol- They claimed that owns the horse, the black gelding will rest on his laurels of the world's record mile In a quarter In 27 seconds, a half In 56 1-4 seconds, and a number of other performances that stand as world's records. In the future Billings will use Uhlan as n saddle horso. The son of Bingham is now 12 years old, but still retains his fieetness of foot. Oscnr Thorson Believes Gotch and Stechor Would Draw Biggest House in Iowa Cnpitnl "Strnngler" Lewis nn Jo won. Tinker to Look After Distillers Waterloo's contention that M. E. Justice is not the legally elected pres- ident of the Central association is be- ing corroborated dally. From the moment that Keokuk posted its for- feit at the annual meeting held in Burlington on Dec. 12, the Waterloo and Marshalltown delegates contend- ed that President Justice was resort- lug to underhanded political methods to save himself from defeat. When President Justice cast his own vote to decide the election the Des Moines, Feb. 17. Oscar Thor- son, wrestling promoter of Des Moines, is one of a large number of lowans who believe that the Gotch- Stecher match, if it ia held -and it will be should he staged in Des Moines. Thorsou ndvancos a number of good arguments iu favor of this city as the site for the big contest. First, he declares that some Iowa or Ne- braska city is entitled to the match, because the principals in the cham- pionship affair are from these states. Des -Moines should be favored be- cause it is nearer Chicago, Minne- apolis, St. Paul, St. Louis and Kan- sas City, which will send thousands of fans to tho mutch if it is held within their reach. Tnorson Gives Treasons. The Des promoter advanc- es another good reason. He says there are many lowans who are "pulling" for Gotch to beat Steelier, but who secretly believe that the Humboldt giant will be unable to do so; on the other hand, every Ne- is certain Steelier can turn the trick. Everyone knows that a Pooria, 111., Fob. Joe Tinker of the Chicago Cubs has closed a deal whereby he will super- vise- the players of the Peoria Three- I league team this season. Details have been arranged and the papers will be signed In ton days. Tinker's proposition to Peoria fans called for the wiping out of a debt of hanging over the club from last year. The fans committee an- nounced the had been sub- scribed. The Peoria Amusement company has agreed to turn over the franchise to the Peoria Pans' association. The new organization is being incorpor- ated. Tinker explains to the fans that he had the players ready to turn over to the association at the proper time and that the name of the new manager would bo announced in a few days. The Fans' association and Tinker will split fifty-fifty, the association furnishing the franchise and Tinker the manager and players. The new association will start free from debt and with approximately in the treasury. Players turn- ed over by the Tinker become the property of the Peoria club. The games this season will be played at Lake View park. Teachers High To Tackle West High ite win than lose. Hence the Nebras- kan fans would come to Des Moines in as large numbers as lo Omaha or Lincoln, whereas many of the lowans would remain at home rather than go to the Nebraska towns. This is Thor- c.-n's argument, and it must be ad- mitted that there is some logic in it. Golch's Opponent. Adolph Krii.st. Frank Gotch's match Feb. 22 with West high basketball plavers wil State Teachers' col- lego high school team at the Y. M. C A. gymnasium tomorrow evening The Teachers high aqviad has been es- tablishing an enviable record, having defeated the Cedar Falls high, eas high and other strong teams in this the Teachers, o'2 to While- the west high players are not expecting a victory over the vis itors tomorrow evening they are pre- paring to give the Normal city five an interesting battle. The west high team will be -I ,T t local delegation opened hostilities, j Edward Santel in San Francisco Mr. Justices vote was in violation of j should measure the lowan's come- the consuuition. The constitution) hack abilHv more than was believed provides that the association shall bei at first, for Santel. It has become composed   in their studies. but wrestle, hero next Tuesday night Ka.st in-ri, Away. that Just now the Gotch-Sar.tel match i The east high team is scheduled to h 1" !s peevcrt at at tomorrow even- a new; San Francisco promoters who are j ing and at La Porte Cltv on Sntnrdav and i figlUins each other in an effort to get JThc game with Independence, howl is in doubt and may be called off- Independence defeated the local agent the president objected voted to retain his position. j the lowan's contract. Waterloo has been accused of re-! Gotch is quoted as saying he doe sorting to unf.-ur tactics in this Know who will get the contract. Steam, while the Orange and Black on Keokuk's former furniture dealer.! says he will rail off all negotia- I men have a victory to their credit Now comes the admission from Mr. i tions it" the wrangling does not stop, iover La Porte City Justice that Keokuk's franchise was! The sporting editor of Tho Resist- transferred to Rock Island on October: er llas received an article entitled 9, laio. In view of that statement! "KeeP History Straight" from .a Justice stands convicted of stealing! wrestling fan of Lansing. la., who the office which he now holds. Keo-i P'dts in a Plea for the recognition of WH.SOX TO PTUATKS. Chicago. Feb. catcher, was sold ves- GOLF BULLS TO COST LESS; WILL BOOST SPORT Itommlo Balls W1U Sell for 25 Ce'ats Gives New Players an ity to Ijcani Game at Big Iteduc- Uon in Cost. Most of the popular makes of golf balls will bo cheaper this season, and fa addition there will be two 25 cent balls on the market. This news was confirmed by a rep- resentative of tlio Wright Ditson company, this week, who explained that his firm as well as A. G. Snald- ing Brother, will market a remade ball this spring for "two bits." The expiration of the Haskell patent on rubber cored balls April 11, 1910, is the contributing factor in the reduction of prices, but Mr. Iceiey explained that the manufactur- ers were reducing the balls more than the former royalty charged by the Inventor. The royalty was 50 cents a dozen. Two Companies Market Cheap Balls. The cessation of the patent may mean that the American market will be flooded with European balls, and American manufacturers are trying to forestall this altho they do not exactly fear it because of the scarcity of rubber In the warring nations. The two manufacturers that are to sell the two bit balls claim they will lose on the renturo, but explain that they hope to make up for tho loss by the additional players who will he drawn into the Scotch game. The cheap balls arc not so lively as the higher priced spheres, and are de- signed for beginners, who, as they become proficient are expected to demand better balls. Announces Prices. The Spaldfug company will mar- ket four balls which will retail for 75 cents, the Red Honor, the Bullet, the Wizard and the Witch; the Baby Dimple and the Orange Domino at 65 cents; the Glory Dimple and the Black Domino at 50 cents; the Red Dot at 40 cents, and the Bob, a new ball, at 25 cents. The old Green Honor has been dropped, the Red Honor remaining at the same price, as Is the case with the Baby Dimple The Glory and the Black Domino aold last year for 65 cents and the Red Dot at 50 cents. The new 25 cent ball will be a recovered ball, the old cores of other balls and the seconds of various grades being used. Wright Ditson have reduced the National Floater from 65 cents to 50 cents, the Blue and Red Circle balls from 50 cents to 40 cents, and have added a new "ball, the Bogie, which will retail for 25 cents. The other balls are the Black Circle Dimple and the Bisk (mesh or 75 cents; the Black Circle, with the bramble mark- ing at 65 cents, and the Birdie or Yellow Circle Dimple at the same price. Whippet. Reduced 10 Cents. The Worthingtoh balls have been reduced as follows: Diamond Ace and Deuce from 75 cents to 65 cents, and the King Bee and Queen Bee from 50 cents to 40 ce.its. The Diamond Kinr; has been cut from 65 cents to 50 cents. The Goodrich prices as compared with last year follow: Whippet, orange and green, from 7-5 cents to G5 cents, and the black, maroon and purple from 75 cents to 50 cents each. The St. Mung company is the onlj American firm which will maintain last year's prices. The Silver King, which formerly sold in America, when it was possible to get them, as this ball was not al- lowed to be sold under the Haskel patent except in Great Britain, for 51, has been reduced to 75 cents. IVtlnn Paint Discarded. As will be seen, while a number of balls will sell at the top price o 75 cents, the reduction in the prices or other balls is quite appreciable While thousands of the American golfers will play with the "six-bit1 balls, the great bulk of golfers wil use the lower priced spheres. A feature of the 191G golf ball? is that none of them will be coatei with Perma paint. Some of the ball were covered with this preparation last year as it was claimed it gave the spheres a whiter hue. This proved to be a fallacy as the coat- ing had a tendency to collect the dust and make the balls darker. Quick Pulmotor BESIDES MASKED THE UP-f <3ET THAT MAKE-UP OM IT'S TIME To GO -H-H- THE PUBLIC IS Of2 M6 AND SAME OLD STUNT. v_. t CAM'T FOOU'6.M MUCH LONGER -TH eY WO'WT STAMD FOR J THE SAME OLD Px OP THS Earl Caddock Only Wrestler To Pin Joe Stecher's Shoulders Yo-ung Iowa Wrestler From Nebraska W.onder Before Either Became Professional .Grap- Worked, on Farms in Oass County, Staged Before 81 People. The Omaha Bee had the following interesting story oE the only defeat charged against Earl Chaddock and the only fall on record against Joe Stecher, champion ol! Jhe world: "Three years ago last April a fall was pinned 011 Joe Stecher. So far as is known this is the only time a referee ever patted an opponent of Joe's on the, back. The lad who turned the trick is Earl Caddock, who Is to Cass county, Iowa, what Stecher is to Dodge county, Ne- braska, and who is the one other wrestler whom mat fans regard as irreproachably honest. "Caddock is a product of Anita, a .little inland town In Cass county. One day he was driving down the road with a learn when he passed the farm of Frank Petit, for whom Stecher was working. Petit stopped to talk to Earl and told him of a "strong fellow" he had working for him. Caddock was regarded as a pretty husky youth around those parts, so Petit suggests that he and the "strong fellow" work out. Cad- dock was agreeable. So the workout was arranged for in a kerosene-lamp-lighted hall in Berea. When Caddock arrived. lie found Stecher on the job. Joe sug- gested that an admission be charged. "What is queried Caddock, "a workout or a wrestling "Let's make it a match." r.aid Joe. "All agreed Caddock. Thirty-one persons were charged a dime a throw to see the fray, thus making a total gate of Stecher copped 60 per cent for his bit and the house manager got .the other 40. The first -fall- of the event went to Stecher. It came, quick. Caddock declares thai It. really wasn't a-fall, but that the referee being a novice at umpiring called it ahead of time. The second fall came just quick, but the referee awarded this fall to Caddock. Proving that he has a pretty good claim to the reputation for honesty, Caddock admits this was no fall either and that the referee again started out ahead of the train. The third fall went to Joe about the same as the.first one. So Joe Was Thrown. So officially Joe Stecher has been j thrown once. Caddock declares no! and he says. "My cal- culations, based on the central me- tereological bureau statistics, show that only twenty-eight times in 100 during the entire winter on an aver- age has the wind blown from the east, southeast or northeast; conse- quently in the winter season a Ger- man gas attack has only twenty- eight chances in a hundred of suc- cess, while an attack by the allies with the same arm has seventy-two chances in a hundred on the fronts running from north to south. On the front running from east to west the. conditions are less favorable to the allies, the north winds being in the ratio of thirty in 100 in winter, and forty in 100 in spring, thirty-eight in 100 in summer and twenty-eight in 100 in autumn." Summing up his calculations, Abbe Moreaux thinks the Germans have less than one chance in three the year round, while the allies have more than two chances in three of- effective use of suffocating gas. RUSSIAN'PAPER is PUBLISHER IX BERLIX Berlin, Feb. official com- munication announces the foundation of a new Russian paper in Berlin, the Russkii Westnik, whose purpose- it is to keep Russia readers inform- ed "in an unpartisan sense" of the military and political situation. The Russian prisoners of war, says the communication, feel especially the need of a newspaper which estimates, events "quietly and objectively." This will he the only Russian paper they are permitted to receive. one of the three falls awarded were real falls, and It doesn't matter as! the event is shrouded in the veil, of j the past, but never let it be said'we can't dig up the old dope on the! Dodge phenom. kuk was not a member of th'o' organ-i "Strangler" Lewis, who In realty is i !ertlay to ihe Pl'tsburph Nationals. Ization, if Mr. Justice's statement to'Bob Fredericks of Lansing. Tinker of the Cubs announc- Ization, if Mr. Justice's statement Fredericks of Lansing the national commission is true, but! The article states The terms of the sale were not WELSH KKFUSKS BIG New York, Feb. Welsh, lightweight champion of the nual meeting held two months laterJ in reality he was held to The Keokuk vote together with the'a draxv by Lewis at Evansville. Ind.. illegal rote of Mr. Justice made his! last in a match that lasted more election possible. In view of these facts will President! believe that n its fight to bring about Mr. Justice's removal from office? Can Mr. Justice's friends still believe that he is the ideal man to head an organization for promot- ing the great national sport. He has resorted to tactics that cannot meet 'with the approval of clean sportsmeu and unless he is removed from his po- than two hour.-, far ls statement that Lew s decided they could not consistently keep three such catchers as Archer. Wilson and Fischer, and concluded' that the former, as longer in service here, had a larger following among old Cub fans. It is probable Catcher Graeco-Roman tournament in j is not accurate, for Lewis Undoubtedly wrestler of much local club. promise, but with" Stecher reports of his match in Evnnsville do not redound to his credit nor do they indicate that lie was entitled to a draw with the Nebraskan, who was .could not run fast enough to catch this section of tte country. I up with the Lansing, la., product. XRW TllTXXY Cedar Hnpids, Feb. Miller, a speedy young infielder who has been playing independent ball in Indiana, has affixed his signature to a contract proffered him by Relden Hill, president of the Cedar ttaplrts ball club. The contract was forward- ed to Mr. Hill by Manager Jack Her- bert. world, thru his manager. Harry Pol- Jock, yesterday received an" offer Tortorich championship winner of He offered to stage the big bout on March -1 and his offer was flat, with ?500 for training expenses. Welsh and his manager refused the offer, as Welsh's next champion- ship haUlc has been practically pro- mised to Charlie White of Chicago. Pollock is now waiting until some city offers a suitable purse for this fight. A year after the tilt with Caddock went to Chicago and ran across a chap named Oakes, who was acting as trainer at Hull house there. I Caddock went to work assisting] Oakes. Earl proved a better manj Uian Oakes so he was entered in the Hull house wrestling tournamsnt. didn't take the lowan long to trim! up the Greeks of the tiouse. Shortly after Caddock entered the' Amateur Athletic union national j tournament at Chicago and won that.] This spring he went to San Francis-1 co and won first honors in the! world's tournament. This made him i the amateur champicn of the world. After the tourney at the exposition j Caddock entered the professional i ranks and in the short six months he has been in the game has thrown a string of more or less good wrestlers, and has not iost a fall yet. great game for Ackley. The Tigers have lost but one game this year. The team is prepared to meet any team in this section of the state. Teams de- siring games should communicate with Frank Stlckley, coach. lion, the rest of it east and west, while the north of France and Bel- gium are all the year round subject- ed to general Atlantic winds; that is to say, winds varying between west PAKKKKSWKO; Parkersburg, Feb. Park- ersburg Tigers, an independent bask- etball team, continued Its winning streak by defeating Ackley Tuesday evening, 67 to WINDS BAFFLE GEUMAXS IX USE OF POISOX GAS j Paris. Fob. IHUe is] heard ncAv of the effects of auffocat- ing gas at the front, tho the official communique frequently mentions at- tacks in which it has been used. The report some months ago, thai French soldiers succumbed to it in the Argonne thru neglect to dis- tribute protecting masks, seems to have been forgotten and in the ab- sence of other reported casualties anxiety seems to have disappeared. Abbe Moreaux, director of the Bourges observatory, explains why the Germans are at a great disadvan- tage on account of the winds, and how the allies could dominate them in that kind of warfare if they saw fit. Cramer was- the! "The battle front, excepting be- THE BEST WATERLOO ADVERTISING MEN SAY COURIER "SEW IS BEST star for Parkersburg, while Noyon and Verdun, runs in a tnO ____L. .__11-- _n_iV. J f the former Cornell star, played a generally northerly-southerly dtrec- A BOWBC. EVERY THREE MINUTES ONE DIES IN THE U. S. The Anti-Tuberculosis Society illus- trates the frightful toll of consumption by extinguishing a light every three minutes, and shows that it is the man or woman, girl or boy, who neglects colds, whose blood is impure, who feels weak and languid, who is the .very one to contract none are immune. During changing seasons, or aftrr j sickness, blood-quality is most impor- i tant, and if you andi your family will j take Scott's Emulsion after meals' it will _charge your bloKxl with health-} sustaining richness, qukkeu circulation, j and strengthen both hiregs and throat. 1 Scott's is free from to i Oetabottleto-day 15-23 The Type-setters have the "Know How" arid the Type and Pressmen'Do The Rest. Ornamental or Plain Commercial Printing of Every Description is Made' Satisfactory to the Customer. WE INVITE A TRIAL ORDER FROM THOSE WHO ARE NOT NOW REGULAR PATRONS We shall see that you are not disappointed. Orders by Mail or Telephone are Urged Now. Blank Book Work and Binding Ordei-s Promptly Executed. Thc Newspaper with the Greatest Circulation is back of Every Job to Help Perfect Publicity. TITE WATERLOO EVENING COURIER and Daily Reporter. Telephone 3330 w. H. HARTMAN co.   

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