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Waterloo Daily Courier Newspaper Archive: March 8, 1948 - Page 2

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   Waterloo Daily Courier (Newspaper) - March 8, 1948, Waterloo, Iowa                        Two MONDAY. MARCH 8. 1948. WATERLOO DAILY COURIER. WATERLOO. IOWA. Two Killed in Prison Car Skid Crash (By Iht Asioctcttd Pressl Church Row Rages Over School Funds _______...__. ___ ___r Washington. D. lowa's 1948 motor vehicle death Republicans look for a heavy tant leaders Monday warned the toll climbed to 64 Monday after ,vote Tuesday in the nation's firs't' Catholic church it is "playing with a weekend which added four fa- prjmary Of the 1948 presidential fire" by striving for union of Stassen and Dewey Vote Test Tuesday Concord, N. Hamp- talities to the list. One accident Sunday campaign church and state in America. broughti jne majn jssuc ai stake is the Firing the second round in the death to a reformatory guard and votc-pulling power of Gov. Thomas controversy with the Catholic to a convict. E Dewey of New York and former church, the protestant leaders said The guard died in the crash and'Gov> the convict, Floyd Albright. 22. DCS Moines. died Monday of his The occurred as occurred as p this state's eight delegate seats at _, the national GOP convention. Hollingsworth, 31. the guard i of this opening i Stassen of Mmne- the church's actions could lead to an outbreak of "passion, fanaticism Both have entcred full slatcs for and hatred." The protcstant leaders recently killed, and 10 convicts of the1 Keeping out Anamosa reformatory, were gems' round arc the out to a prison farm to do the morning chores. The truck in which they were riding, driven by Edwin John- i son, of Menlo, la., one of the convicts, skidded on the icy road and went off a 15-foot embank- ment. Johnson was uninjured. other two an- nounced Republican presidential Robert A. Taft of Ohio and Gov. Earl Warren of California. of trying get special privileges from the government. Girl Bored in Small Town Kills Parents Eminence, Mo. A 17-year- old brunet was held Monday on a charge of murder in the fatal shooting of her mother and father. Betty Jane Kroeger signed a statement Sunday saying she shot her mother to death in their home Tuesday and killed her father in his store the following day, High- way Patrol Captain J. A. Tandy reported. The bodies of. Fred Kroeger, 50, and his wife, Minnie, 48, were found Saturday night. The girl The other convicts, none seri- Dewey and Stassen themselves have been cautious about predict- ously injured, were Harvey Spoon- i ing a victory, but their supporters er, Hamilton, Kan.: Tom Niefert., have made clear they intend to Des Plaines. 111.: Willis Ma'.hcr. i seize upon a victory for their can- Tarkio, Mo.: Bernard Helm, Wa-. didate as a definite national trend, terloo; Oral Wilson. Dewey aides are publicly pre- Lyle Wells. Palo: Wilbur ZochJ dieting they will gain at least four of the eight delegates; privately expect more with even the possi- bility of a clean sweep. Stassen campaign managers publicly claim five delegates; Arthur: and Earl Jones, Dexter. Spooner suffered a broken leer. Wilson a broken arm and Helm a dislocated arm. The others suf- fered only bruises. At Cedar Rapids. Mrs. Patrick A. Frank, 19, of Cedar Rapids, was killed Sunday when a car driven by her husband was in collision with a Milwaukee freight train a quarter of a mile north of Coving- ton, on highway 74. hemorrhage. He was born DEATHS OTIS E. ANDERSON'. Otis E. Anderson. 77, of 354 Hal- stead street, died at a. m the presidential primary, Sunday at his home of a cerebral'but eight years ago the- turnout was Jan. 2, 1871. at' Outwardly Stassen has conducted Buchanan county. Iowa, the son of' the more aggressive campaign. The Minncsotan stumped the state twice within the last five weeks and drew big crowds to rallies held on the style of a New England town meeting with qucstion-and-answcr forums aft- er every speech. Dewey has relied mainly on a well-organized Isaiah and Jane Anderson, ana married Elnora Slaughter, Apr. 10. 1900. at Fargo, N. D. They re- turned to Buchanan county, where he farmed until 1903. The family then moved to Wa- terloo where Anderson was em- ployed by the Illinois Central railroad. Later, he worked for the city in the street and park de This violated, the protestants said, the traditional separation of church and state in the United' States. President Truman is sure of the Most Rev. John T. McNicholas. Democratic indorsement archbishop of Cincinnati, denied ing alone in the field. the protcstant charge in a stinging reply. He said such statements were "untruths." Monday the protestant leaders j said the archbishop's reply was "hollow" and "manifestly mislead- ing." "You say that the hierarchy does not want union of church and state." the protestant statement said. "But its actions dispute its word. "It at least wants union of church and state at the public treasury, and it is working with great energy to secure such a union. Your denial can not cover up this fact." The statement was made in the form of an open lettffr by a group known as Protestants and other Americans United for Sep- aration of Church and State. Among the group's officers are Dr. Edwin McNeill Poteat, presi- dent of Colgate-Rochester Divinity school; Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam of New York, and John A. Mackay, president of the Princeton theo- logical seminary. The burden of the protestants' complaints was that the church sought public funds for support of j j its parochial schools. say privately they will be moder- ately satisfied with placing three. There are about regis- tered voters in New and they provide a good cross-sec- tion of city and farm sentiment. Upwards of 55.000 are expected to mark ballots esti- mated 43.000 Republicans, Democrats. In war said her outlook on life c h anged when she left East St. Louis. w Betty Kroeger Flying Sroup Impressed by South Africa New party of 20 news executives, government offi- cials, and airlines executives re- turned Monday from a flight to the Union of South Africa. They said they were impressed with the potential natural resources and the frontier-like atmosphere of that country. The party arrived at La Guar- dia airport on the Pan-American World airways clipper Southern Cross at 8 a. m., after a.flight from Santa Maria, the Azores. The flight marked the completion of Pan-American's first direct service between New York and he r e the Johannesburg South Mrica nilv livori ._ South Africa has far more po- _AV.. t fh_ tentialities than any of us expect- Ozarks ed to Hugh Baillie' She said the of thc Unitcd Press- said- change from! is a new country in J being gay city rcsPccts- The people have a stood to Ozark coun- atmosphere about them. "Many of them told us they thought of their country as in the same position as the United States of 50 or 60 years ago." Lenten Meditations This is one of a series of messages from Waterloo churchmen to be pub- lished during the Lenten season. I Cor. "Now if Christ preached that He rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead? And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins." At this season we are naturally called to meditate upon the resur- rection of and its ultimate meaning to the world. All nature about us speaks now of death and the hope of the com- fng resurrection made manifest in the coming of Spring. Paul said, "For the in- visible things of Him from the creation of the THE DAILY RECORD IN BRIEF The Weather WATERLOO: Fair and cold tonight: in- ckVaslnf cloudiness and warmer Tues- day. Sunrise Tuesday, sunset. IOWA: Generally fair tonight, colder In cast and central Tuesday, increasing cloudiness with snow m southwest Tuesday afternoon: rising temperatures Tuesday. WATERLOO TEMPERATURES. Minimum Saturday (official) .........7 Maximum Sunday (official! ..........29 Minimum Sunday (official) ..........19 Monday. 8 a. m. (official) ............21 Monday. 9 a. m. (downtown) .........22 Monday, 11 a. m. (downtown) .........24 Monday. 1 p. m. (downtown) .........25 Monday. 3 p. m. (downtown) .........25 Maximum year ago ...................3G Minimum year ago ....................23 Wind velocity. 9 a. m. Wind direction. 8 a. m. (airport) ___NW world clearly try life made her unhappy. The girl told a newspaper re- porter who in- terviewed her in jail that she shot Bailie said Gen. Jan her mother accidentally following prime minister of thc Union of Christ, an argument over the ironing of a South Africa, was gravely con- cerned about the international sit- are seen, under- by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead; so that they are with- out excuse." (Rom. God has revealed Himself in na- Smuts. ture. which is His creation through must be born again, receive Christ as your personal Saviour from your sins. Believe and live. "As many as received Him, to them gave He the power to become the sons of God. even to them that 'believed on His name." (St. John REV. LESLIE E. THOMAS Hagerman Baptist Church Rev. Thomas. dress. Tandy quoted her as saying she then killed her father because she knew he would find out about the first slaying. She said she shot her father uation and had asserted that "the time has come for the nations of the world to make a against eastern European aggres- sion. The officer said Betty Jane made two trips to St. Louis after her parents" deaths. She was arrested Sunday as she returned to Eminence from St. Louis, about 120 miles northeast of here. partments. He has been retired ing his duties as governor of New for the past 12 years. York prevented him from coming Surviving are his wife and two' here. sisters, Mrs. John T. Dobson, Dcwey's voice was heard in the Stunner street, and Mrs. W. W.'campaign, however, through in the middle of his Blood Clot Kills Gov. McConaughy of Connecticut Pratt, Cedar Rapids, la. f i A'J.l.XxVLlClUJHllJ' HI Ul iliO casts over local radio stations o lfirst term as Connecticut-s gover. He was preceded in death by, transcribed recordings of some of four brothers and one sister. The body is at Parrott funeral home awaiting completion of funeral arrangements. STANLEY D. ROWE. Stanley D. Rowe. 63, died at a. m. Monday at the home of his stepdaughter. Mrs. A. L. Hard- ing, 448 Lane street, of a lingering illness and complications. He was born at Plainfield. la.. Sept. 17, 1884. the son of Alfred and Hattie Rowe and married Fanny Baldwin. Aug. 12, 1918. at Nashua, la. Rowe was employed by the Il- linois Central railroad as a telegrapher from 1906 to 1947 when his major speeches. Foreign Roundup (Continued) faced Monday with a Communist nor. The 60-year-old Republican chief executive, who entered politics after winning distinction as a col- lege administrator, died suddenly from a blood clot in the heart Sun- day in Hartford hospital. A family funeral service will be threat to make the country "walk held Tuesday in the the path of The warning came from Com- munist Leader Karl Altmann Who quit the Austrian cabinet last November. Even as statement. Altmann Ferdinand issued Graf. his se- curity secretary, said that Com- Wesleyan university chapel at in Middle- town, where he served as president from 1925 to 1943. A memorial service will be held in the state capitol at 2 p. m. Wednesday. The lieutenant governor, also a Warns Big Tax Cut to Bring Complications Washington. D. Revenue Commissioner Schoene man warned the senate finance committee Monday that the and a half billion dollar house tax- cut bill would destroy much of what has been done toward simpli- fying income taxes. Schocneman urged the commit- tee at hearings on the bill to re- move the complicating factors from the house measure. He declared that unless this is done severe administrative diffi- culties would develop. He said: "Every effort should be made to achieve further simplification rath- er than further complication rath- cially for the taxpayers in the In nature God shows His power; in the incarnation, becoming flesh and dwelling among us. He has shown His grace and truth. The authority of Christ as a teacher of supernatural truth rests upon His miracles: the miracle of His incarnation; His virgin birth; His sinless life; His power over the things of nature, disease, afflictions of men, death itself; and especially upon the miracle of His resurrection. He attested to His own resurrec- tion by thirteen different appear- ances which are recorded in the Scriptures. His resurrection teaches us that His work of atonement was completed and was sufficient for our salvation; His resurrection showed Him to be Lord of all, worthy to be the judge of both the quick and the dead: and His resur- rection furnishes the ground for and the pledge of our own resur- rection. It is upon the basis of His resur- rection that our salvation from sin depends. "And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; you are in Waterloo Mar. 17 d "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who in His great mercy has be- gotten us anew to a living hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead." (I Pet. for Southeastern Iowa Des snow was forecast Monday for southeastern Iowa, but for the first time in more than a week the highway department said driving was "rea- sonably safe at moderate speeds." It would remain cold until Tues- day, the weather bureau said, although not ,as cold as Sunday I night's low of one above at Atlan- tic. Monday night's temperatures were expected to be five above in the north and 12 above in the south. Tuesday's high temperatures were forecast at 26 to 30 degrees. .Peace Officers Meet Wants to Lend 500 Million to slx The Waterloo police department will play host to the North Iowa Peace Officers association at- a meeting to be in Russell-Larnson hotel Mar. 17, Police Chief Harry Krieg said Monday. Principal speaker at the meet- ing will be Dr. James Reinhardt. of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. A nationally recognized expert who is on the faculty of the fed- 1 eral bureau of investigation police! training schools, Dr. Reinhardt will speak here on the subject "Sex Perversion and Crime." Washington, D. (ff) state department announced Mon- day it will ask congress soon to let the Export-Import bank lend to Latin American countries. The announcement was in a statement sent to the house for- eign affairs committee. It said the department also plans to request "to prevent disease and unrest" in the American-British zone in Trieste during the 15-month pe- riod between Apr. 1, 1948, and June 30, 1949. The committee had asked what foreign aid programs were intend- ed other than the European aid and China aid plans already pro- posed. The department listed these timated authorizations and appro- priations to be 1. An economic rehabilitation ap- proportion for Japan, Korea and the Ryukyu islands. The army is developing the phn, the department said, and the Births Reported. To Mr. and Mrs. Clair Koobs. Gnmdy Center. la., a Klrl. at Allen Memorial. To Mr. and Mrs. Gophered Abbcn. 101 East Parker, a girl, at Allen Memorial. To Mr. and Mrs. Earl Atkcnson. Route a Kirl. at Allen Memorial. To Mr. and Mrs. Harold Busse. Aplir.g- ton. la., a Rirl. at Allen Memorial. To Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rein- beck, la., a boy. at Allen Memorial To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Workentin. La Porte City. la., a cirl. at Allen Memorial. To Mr. .and Mrs. Laverne Schwake. 144 Dearborn, a boy. at St. Francis. To Mr. and Mrs. Jess F. Emery, Jr.. 403 David, a sirl. at St. Francis. To Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson Essers. 807 Beech, a boy, at St. Francis. To Mr. and Mrs. Louis Holbcch. 836 Maxwell, a boy. at St. Francis. To Mr. and Mrs Albert Holman. Rein- beck, la., a boy. at St. Francis. Licensed to Wed Joseph W. Dolinsky, Minneapolis ....32 Mary Paulzlne. Minneapolis ..........22 Roy Nicholas Robert. 515 East Park ...23 Wiima Halvcrson, Waterloo ...........21 Lester L. Slater. Wavcrly. la........20 Jacqueline Lamm, 703 Clay. C. Falls ..18 J. Hugh ClisiOld. 725 Fletcher ........39 Marilyn Morris. 716 Kinsley .........30 Harold T. Beach, Heinbeck, la. .legal age Ellen Gladys Kopplin, 208 Lm- dale legal ace Paul A. Gerber. 90S .19 Henrietta M. Halvcrson. 517 W. Ninth ..19 Jay Tovar. 52'2 Lafayette Helen Terrenes. 1636 Burton .........23 Robert F. Walker. Ft. Dodge .........23 Opal Stanbra. Fort Dodge. la........27 amount "has not yet been finally determined." 2. Authority to extend finan- cial aid to the Trieste zone. This will be asked under the law providing for help to Italy, France and Austria. 3. The loan authorization for Latin-America. The only congres- sional action needed is an exten- sion of the Export-Import bank's present lending authority. 4. A interest-free loan for the construction of United Nations headquarters. This is to be arranged by an agreement between the United States and the UN. The loan would be repaid in 30 years. 5. Inter-American military co- operation. The department said no figures are available yet on how much will be asked to put into effect cooperation plans outlined in legislation already before the house. MOTHER To have this assurance you Jerry See formal oath of office as governor aScnts "at and' Monday, and said his first official he retired because of ill health are preparing for wide- act WJu be to proclaim a period of He moved to Waterloo from Nashua sPrcad in 1920. Surviving are his wife, two daughters, Mrs. Ray Steele. and Mrs. Genevieve Dumpprope. both of Esterville, two granddaughters. one stepdaughter. Mrs. Harding, one stepson. Gaylord Baldwin. Anchorage. Alaska, and one sister. Mrs. Louella Sharpe of Chicago. He was preceded in death by his parents. Rowe was a member of Trinity American Lutheran church, the Independent Order of Odd fellows, and the Order of Railroad Telegraphers. Funeral arrangements are incom- plete. The body is at Locke funeral home. LUDWIG W. MUELLER. Funeral services for Ludwig W. Mueller. 59, of 1112 Columbia street, who died at his home Saturday Russia Moscow in Austria. (fP) Monday was Republican, arranged to take groups, as a means of en- couraging rather than discourag- ing voluntary compliance with the tax laws." i Schoeneman took no position on public mourning. Flags already were flying at half i a staff on many public buildings. Women's day in oc- casion corresponding roughly to Mother's day in America. Pravda, organ of the Com- munist party, observed' the day by commenting that 47 per cent of all workers in Soviet economy arc women. In 1940. the figure was 40 Washington. D. fed- eral grand jury Monday indicted p i j eipht corporations on charges of angiana conspiring to fix milk prices here. London The Bulgarian, The indictmcnt said that the 8 Corporations Indicfed in Fix of Milk Prices cent. minister to London. Prof. Nikola Dolaptchicv. announced Sunday j v.olatcd the federal tax cut. explaining that this( question "is not within my ince." i i Sen. Millikin com- mittee chairman, predicted that thc group will approve a 4 bil- lion, 500 million to five billion dollar tax cut this week. He said the committee will con- clude hearings Wednesday and will attempt to complete action on the bill Thursday. This would enable the legislative dafting service, he explained, to have thc bill ready for senate con- sideration next Monday. PREFERRED BY MILLIONS SO PURE, SO FAST, SO DEPENDABLE StJoseph ASPIRIN HEW! ST.JOSEPH ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN Easy to take. Has orange flavor that's sweetened to child'staste. Easy to give. SOtabletsfor 35c, Try it! WORK 
                            

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