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Waterloo Daily Courier Newspaper Archive: July 3, 1906 - Page 1

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Publication: Waterloo Daily Courier

Location: Waterloo, Iowa

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   Waterloo Daily Courier (Newspaper) - July 3, 1906, Waterloo, Iowa                             LAKGEST BONA FIDH OF ANT PAPER IN WATERLOO. ER: INDICATIONS. .J, Chicago, III., July Fair tonight and Wednesday. SIXTEENTH YEAK. WATERLOO, TUESDAY EVENING, ,JULV 1906. NO. 4853 NEWS FROM WASHINGTON ranama Canal Bonds Expected-to Bring Good Price. Senator Allison's Absence From Senate Was Felt. White House in Need of Repairs. Other Capital News. Washington, D. C., July early announcement is expected from PresS- jdont Roosevelt as to the make up of the interstate commerce commission under the new rate law. Iowa will probably he represented by E. E. Clark of fJedar of the Order of Rail- way Conductors. J. S. Harlan of Illi- nois will probably be added to the commission, anil it is learned from high authority 'that Mr. Harlan will probably be made chairman. There has been much talk of two oth- er Iowa men for membership 011 this commission, Col. W..P. Hepburn and ex-Governor Larrabee. Representative Hepburn was the choice of a large number of the members of the house for this place and ex-Governor Larra- bee has many friends who would like ,to see him nominated. The chief dif- ficulty in the way, is that neither Colonel Hepburn nor Mr. Lar- rabee desirps to be appointed to the In a letter to a friend here some time ago ex-Governor Lar- rabee definitely put ftimself out of the race and in discussing the subject yes- terday; Colonel Hepburn said that he did not want a place on the commis- sion and would not accept air appoint- ment thereto. He regards the duties of members of'this commission as ardu- ous and at his time of life has no de- sire to take them upon himself: The appointment of Mr. Clark has not been officially announced, but it is generally understood that it is decided on. Presi- dent Roosevelt has been friendly to Mr. Clark since he served on tire com- mission that arbitrated the'coal strike about three years ago. Franklin Lane of California has been confirmed as a member of the commis- sion and Knapp, Prouty, Cockrell and Clements will be retained. Allison Absent. Washington, D. C., July has developed that the absence ot" Senator Allison from the senate was the cliief cause of the difficulty of Saturday, whereby there was a delay in adojurn7 ment .and much irritation over the de- lay. Senator his'years of experience, has acquired perfect famil- iarity with appropriation measures. There was delay and friction such as would never have been noticed if Sen- ator Allison had been in charge. This friction led to sharp criticisms of the government printing office. Not .all of this was deserved, and -had Senator Allison been present there is not the slightest doubt that things would have passed much more smoothly. Thomas P. Cleaves, clerk of the ap- propriations committee, has received ti letter from L. J. Neely, Senator Alli- son's private secretary, saying that Senator Allison 'was gaining strength rapidly since reaching Iowa. His ap- petite is improving and he is showing many signs of regaining the best of health. Leaving Washington. Washington, D. C., July Iowa members generally have left, the city. Colonel Hepburn and Representative Cousins were the only members of the delegation remaining here yesterday. Senator Dolliver has gone to New York and alter a few days' rest will depart J'or Iowa. Colonel Hepburn will depart for Iowa Friday ami will spend the summer at his home in Clarinda. A Jloon to Keokulc. Washington, O. C.. July sentative Hepburn discussed the bill whereby the Keokuk and Hamilton W'aler Power company, which is to build a dam at Kookuk, is the right' to condemn such land as it needs for its 'project. This measure is ono of general application and clothes power companies with authority to condemn land in such cases. t Colonel Hepburn said that the bil.l that was passed insured the construction the Keokuk dam and in his opinion would make Keokuk the greatest manufac- turing center in Iowa. The company that, will provide the power there has a capital of It. will have 000 horse power at its disposal and be able to provide power for all localities within a radius of 150 miles at low river. AVhite House Repairs. Washington, D. C., July ;5. the adjournment of congress it lias de- veloped that extensive repairs must be made to the White houso before President Roosevelt and his family re-, turn, next autumn. y The discovery "was made almost coin'ckieritally with the killing by Harry K. Thaw of Stan- ford White, one of the firm of archi- tects which three years ago directed the remodeling of the White- house. Some of the work done on the White house at that time has1 failed. It has been found necessary to replace the roofs on both the east and west ter- races, either because of faulty con- struction or because the work was rushed to such an extent that early frosts subsequently damaged It. Examination for Inspectors. Washington, D. C., July carry into effect the meat inspection law en- acted by congress the civil: service commission has announced an exami- nation of inspectors to.be held on July 21. The regulations dO not require that inspectors be veterinarians, but they must be qualified from experience to determine whether or not meat is sound, wholesome, and fit for human food. They must be competent to supervise the preparation of various meat food products, must be between 21 and 50 years of age, aud must have had not less than one years' exper- ience in the work required to be done. The entrance salary is per an- num. The Bond Sale. Washington, D. C., July at the treasury department develops that in selling the Panama canal bonds Secretary Shaw is not actuated by any desire to bolster up the treasury at this time or to disburse the money to pay the expenses of canal construction. The money is to be held by the de- partment to support the financial mar- ket next fall should a crisis occur in Wall street. There was some surprise expressed over the announcement that bonds would be sold. It was known the treas- ury would be reimbursed on account of canal -expenses already incurred, but it was understood the bond sale would be deferred until late summer or early fall. The treasury has.no need of funds at this juncture, having on the largest working balance recorded for months. Conditions in the big money centers are not considered particularly favor- able for a bond sale, because of the weakness of stocks. Notwithstanding these facts the treasury officials believe the bonds will sell for as high as 100. It is not expected any will sell for less than The price United States bonds of was 103 7-S. THE FOREIGN NEWS BUDGET The Church of St. Michael Hamburg Destroyed. at Rows of Other Buildings Dcomed By Spread of the Flames. STILL DEADLOCKED Rushing Preparations for Sailing of Wellman Expedition. [By Associated Press.] U'amburg, July great, church St. Michael, with a towei spire 420 feet high, was totally de- stroyed by fire today. The falling tower killed four workmen. The fire is spreading. Rows of buildings are in (lames and the wind is blowing strongly. Worse Than Tinned Meat. London, July Page Gaston of Chicago, before a commit- tee of the house of lords today, :tes- tified that the cigarette is worse than Chicago tinned meats." The Henley Uogiittii. Henley, Eng., July the sec- ond heat of the Grand Challenge cup the Argonauts beat the Thames Rowing club. Tromsoe, Norway, July ing of the Prithjof with the equip- ment-of the Wellman-Record-Herald polar expedition is being pushed night and day so that the voyage to Spitsbergen can bo started July 4. The cargo, which must be taken to the sailing point of the airship, is larger than the capacity of the Frithjof and it will be necessary to ship seventy-five tons of sulphuric acid and forty tons of iron, used for gas making, by another steamer. The Frithjof started its first voy- age from hore, to Spitsbergen- on June 15, carrying Major Hersey, seventeen men, and the material necessary for building houses, machine shops and sheds at the northernmost depot. When the auxiliary steamer sails the overflow cargo' this week, it Will make three voyages which have been necessary to transport the ex- pedition's equipment from Tromsoe to Spitsbergen. The fragile and delicate parts oil the airship are intact and in good or- der, though handled nine limes bo- tween Paris and Tromsoe in transfers between railroads and steamship lines. Unless some unforseen acci- dent intervenes, u determined effort reach the pole this XO TOMORROW. Following out the custom ol" many yonrs' .st-nmling no papei' will 1m is- sued office ol' (he Daily Cou- rier .tomorrow. Tin- employes of the office, iii nil departments, will In' given a holiday to celebrate the "na- tion's birdmny-us fancy may dictate. It is sincerely liopcO out of (he noise, the turmoil, tlie, cauldron of exploding dynamite and powder, llto bnbul of .intonation, may come every man, woman, boy and girl all of his oi' her (Infers iutucl eyes unimpaired. THAW'S MOTHER TOLD OF TRAGEDY Informed Upon Her Arrival London This Morning. in White's Family Will be Active in the Prosecution. Twelve Hundred Ballots Taken in 37th District Convention. [Evening- Press.] City, July sena- torial convention of the Thiry-sev- enth district, has taken twelve hun- dred ballots in this city and the dead- lock continues. The vote stands: Chase, Webster City, clora, 10; Peterson, There is no outlook the deadlock today. 17; Ifil- Ciarion, 15. for a break in BLOODY FIGHT Bad Mix Up in Fort Dodge Night. Last to [Evening Press.] Fort. Dodge, la., June. a bloody fight, with knives and bricks last night in front, of a local saloon, participated in by seven or eight men. Will Bessin was slashed across the eye ball with a knife and will 'lose the sight. Mack Ellis received three broken ribs and an unknown tramp had his skull frac- tured by a blow from a brick. will be made summer. Thus far the reports from the arctic have been unusually unfavor- able. Drift ice in large quantities and heavy snowstorms were encount- ered by the Frithjof on its return voyage from Spitsbergen. North of; there the weather is even more rigid. Skippers, however, offer the en- couragement of prospective good weather in July and August. Xiival Maneuvers. the result of the naval maneuvers both the attacking and defending fleets claim a victory. Both suffered loss in ships. Command- er May, accompanying the attacking fleet, captured the Scarborough and telegraphed to King Edward "We have obtained complete control of the Eng- lish channel, and have demanded the surrender of the English supports." The defenders ca'ptured the battle- ship Victorious, flagship of Rear Ad- miral Archibald Milne, together with the battleship Royal Oak and two cruisers, in a battle off Cape Finisterre and claim that they secured the trade route by driving the attackers into the North sea. COMMITTED TO ASYLUM. A. KuthcrVonl, I own, an ICjii'Iy i.s Insane Set Her of A Business good enough for you to devote your time to, is good enough 'for some other man to invest his 'money in. You can fmd the "other man" by using the Courier. Columns. [Evening Press.] Boone, July RutherVord, a resident-of the county since .IS'iO, a prominent, and .wealthy Mason, was ta.ken from his home near Madrid yesterday and sent to Olarinda. Ho is mildly insane. SAVE HEALTH AND WEALTH An Important Me'eting to Devise Ways and Means. To Prevent River's Overflow and Stagnant Water. Alton Itcbnte Case [By Associated Press.] Chicago, July taking of testimony in the rebate cases of the Alton railroad and two former of- ficiels was concluded in the federal cour today. Attorneys for the de- fense made a motion that the court direct the jury to return a verdict of not guilty and argument followed. Would Build Wing Dam and Open Cut-Off. THE DREADED CHOLERA A Virulent Type of the Disease Visits Manila and Provinces. [By Associated Press.! Manila, June of a viru- lent type hns broken out among the natives of Manila and surrounding pro- vinces. Four Americans at Manila are strieken. One is dead. Twenty- one cases and sixteen ilofiths wore re- ported today. The provinces report, twenty-six eases and twenty-live deaths. The suburbs and Fort Mc- Klnley are rpiaranllued. There has beon onb death among the soldiers. Inspirftd by the laudable desire to prevent the overllnw of ihc city in tiniOB of high wale.r. safe- R'uardlnu savlnpr the beauties and benefits U> bo derived from the parks up stream; protecting the health of the citiv.ens of Chan- tan qua and Sonci parks against the deadly miasma likely to lurk in stagnant, water, a meet- was lielci at Ihe court: biui.se today to dovlKi? moans to cover tbo expense of building a wiupr dajn at the bead of the cut-off ana placing brldjres OVCM- the stream when Ihe cut off shall be removed. A commlltee was ap- pointed Lo reduce the various fac- tors oC the problem to a workable- basis, the members of which are as follows: To represent Chau- taufiiiii association. W. Miller: park eonimlM.sloncr.s-, t'.. P. Fow- ler: Sniifi Sou el axHociallon, H. M. Heed; cltV council. J. H. Hilde- braud; W. C. F. X. I tail way, H, One tbo most Important, meet- ings held in the city, estimated by the which H Is bopud to ac- complish, wns held In the court honwe forenoon, presided over by I Miller list and .1. Kastnn ns He'crcMary. In allendanci' were rep- I I'eaentallvcK of Hie chiuilauiina asso- ciation, Saus Soucl association, the city of Waterloo, through ilie mayor and Alderman French and Hilde- brand; the W., .O. F. railway, through President 1-. S. ami tlie park' board, through F. Fowler president. Aiming those present be- sides the. ifcntlemeu named were i'. T, Wilson. City engineer of M.: L.. Newton, engineer of Hie railway .company; 10. flcketlj counsel for the railway company; H. F. ywisher, city attorney of Joo; G. K; Llchty, H. .M." J. C. Gates; Rev. C. H. Secciiinbo, O. J. Fullerum, J. French. J. D. W. W. M'tller of Ihe association and others. The object of the meeUiiK was lo re- duce to a workable basis a .solution of the differences between the eliy and the railway company tin.- oprninj, of. the cut-off, suit for which is now pending1 and has been sel over lie- cause oC a. belief that Hie case can be amicably settled out of, court. The engineers made their report pointing out the feasibiliiy of building a wing dam near the bead of the cut- off at a -cost oi between and of the construction of wiAgon and railway bridges at I he cut off, whore the embankment is to bo re- removed, using tbe same abut nuMits, but each bridge., being distinct the ctty's bridge occupying tbe lilgbway and the railway company's occupying' its riglu of way iidjoininjv. Tbe bridge to bu used by the citv may be built for or thereabouts; It will have a 120-foot span and a road- way of IS' or feet. Importance ol' Action. The manifold interests 
                            

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