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Waterloo Courier: Wednesday, February 19, 1896 - Page 1

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   Waterloo Courier (Newspaper) - February 19, 1896, Waterloo, Iowa                             PART 1WRST PAGES i 11 TO 8 i mi ii i MM VOL 45 Weekly Established 1858 Daily EeUblirtcd 180O WATERLOO IOWA WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 19 1896 Single Copies Kive Cents WHOLE 1912 LEGISLATIVE GOSSIP NEWSY LETTER FROM JULIEN R1CH ARDS OUR CORRESPONDENT es In Better Monu ment of Dr McClelland of Consent Bill Referred Back to oil the Code V DES MOIJJES Feb ingthe foreboding character of thCire port made by Treasurer Herriott to the house money has been coming into the state treasury since the first of the month in a fairly satisfactory manner and when legislative pay day came on Wednesday last there was something like on hand to meet the de mands It took about of this amount to pay the members of the gen eral assembly the first installment or half of their salary which by law be comes due them at the end of the first month of the session After the rants for the pay of the members had been issued Auditor McCarthy said that lie could begin to see daylight lam not going to crow before out of the woods he remarked butI thinknow that we will be able to meet all the requisitions of the state Iinstitutions which we have had to scale down in order to be certain to have enough funds on hand to pay the ex penses of the legislature Monument Muddle The trouble over the ornamentation on the soldiers monument is in a fair way for a settlement The matter was referred to the committees of the two bodies on military aud they have beeu considering what was the best course to pursue The demand for representa tion of all the Iowa regiments ou the monument having become so strong it has been determined that the com mission should place medallions thereon in addition to those already provided for to represent the 21 Iowa regiments which were left out in the cold by the original arrangement of the commission It is also proposed that the names of each of the regiments and the date of en listment and muster out shall be carved on the base of the monument Iu this connection it is interesting to note the opinion of the various posts of the G A R of Iowa iu regard to the appro priateness of the proposed ornamenta tion By resolution of the house re quests were pent to the different posts in the state asking that they report the f feeling of tlieir members in regard to the placing of the medallions on the monument and also whether in their opinion the statue of Victory should be taken down Eeplies have been received within the past few days from a large number of the posts and have beeu filed with the com mittee of the house oil military The sentiment seems to be largely in opposi tion to the proposed medallions but in regard to the removal of the statue Victory the replies are rather in favor of allowing it to remain on the ground that it would cost a large sum to have the statue taken down and another put in its place Many replies however state that if there is any change made they favor the substitution of a soldier One post favors a statue of the old war governor Kirkwood Another favors a plain shaft like the monument on Bunker Hill How the Posts Voted The following posts have voted iu op position to the portraits on the medal lions Greenfield Museatiue Lyons Miles Eagle Grove Belmond Agency Cedar Falls Indianola Atalissa Ran dolph Prairie City Marshalltown Allertou Washington Toledo Glad brook Wyoming Earlharn Sheldon Brooklyn Waukori Mt Ayr Maqno fceta Walker Wilton Corydou Leon Bellevue Eraeline Sabnla Monmoutb Andrew Perry Iowa City Oskaloosa Fanfield Bassett Marengo Chariton Guttenburg Richlaud Seymour Keo saiiqna Carson Maxwell Estherville Rockwell Parkersbnrg Sauborn De corah Hnmboldt Clariiida Auita New Hartford Coggau Ceflar Rapids Mar Ion WliatCheer The following posts voted to have the medallions put onthe monument as de signed by the commission Boonsboro Burlington Wellmau Winfield Center ville Independence Farragut Gold fieldi Lake City Gruudy Center The following posts favor the removal of the statue of Victory and the substi tution of some other figure preferably that of a soldier Lyons Belmond Marshalltown Washington Wellmari Macksburg Earlham Brooklyn Ma qnoketa Walker Wilton Marengo Chariton Guttenburg Seymour Farra gut Hnmboldt New Hartford Coggan Cedar Rapids The following posts favor allowing the statue to remain Greenfield Mns catine Miles Eagle Grove Boonsboro Burlington Atalissa Randolph Prairie n City Allerton Toledo Gladbrook Wyoming Sheldon Mt Ayr Bassett Richlaud Winfield Genterville Inde pendence Wihthrbp Goldfield Lake City Rockwell Parkersburg Sauborn Decorah Olarinda Anita Marion Grundy Center What Oheor This ballot it seems is a pretty fair expression of the feelings of the old soldiers of the state in regard to what should appear on Jio monument Dr McClcllMidi Dmith The death of Dr McClelland of Cedar Rapido one of the members of tho house from Linn comity which occurred at home on Thursday morning was karned with sorrow by all tho mom twit When he oame hen at the open lot of the session he WM in BOOT health but he thought that it was only a pass ing indisposition from which he would recover when the weather became colder The mild weather with the raw winds that have prevailed was un favorable and he began to grow weaker However he would not admit that he was seriously affected until in his en feebled condition he could scarcely walk UD the easv fliehts of stens which lead into the hall of the house Then he concluded to go home saying as he bade his colleagues adieu that he would be back in a short time ready to take hold of the work of legislation with vigor They felt however that he was deceiv ing himself and so when the news of Ms death came they were not greatly surprised The funeral was held from Ibis home in Cedar Rapids Sunday and in honor of the deceased a committee of the house consisting of Messrs Smith Davis Bowen Lambert Grote and Nietert was appointed to attend the funeral Dr McClellauds desk in the house is covered with the flag for which he fought draped in black with the typi cal evergreen and lily at the top and his memory will be cherished by all who met him during his brief membership of the house so untimely ended by death The visit of the pic neer lawmakers who celebrated their ninth biennial ses sion in the city last week was a pleasant interruption to the routine of proceed ings Speeches were made by the old time members and answered by the members of the present day congratu lations were exchanged and good wishei galore Hon John A Kasson Colonel Moore Hon L L Ainsworth Coloue Scott Judge Noble and others spoke for the visitors and the present members were represented by Lieutenant Gover nor Parrott Senators Blanchard and Eaton and Representatives Temple and others in the house Aft of Consent Measure The senate consumed much time las week discussing the age of consent bill The strife was on the adoption of the report of the majority or minority of the committee to wJiich it was referred The majority report made the crime committed when the female was of the age of 14 or under rape and punishable with imprisonment in the penitentiary for life or any term of years If the girl is between 14 and 16 the punishment to be at the discretion of the court a term in the penitentiary not to exceed five years or a jail sentence not to exceed one year and a fine not to exceed The minority report raised the age when the crime is rape to 16 and the time for the graded punishment to 18 years Senator Rowen supported the minor ity report in a strong speech Sen ator Ellis championed the majority re port in an address which was an equally strong presentation of that side of the question The question reached a vote on Friday and the minority report was at first substituted then the vote wa reconsidered and it was again substi tuted by a tie vote which was broken by the lieutenant governor voting in the affirmative Several amendments were then offered and withdrawn and finally tue bill was referred back to the com mittee It is believed probable that when the measure finally passes both houses it will provide for raising the age of consent to 15 or 16 years Committees Working on the Code The work on code revision is making fair progress in the committees of the senateThe assessment question has been bothering them considerably es pecially in regard to placing private banks under state supervision in order that a correct understanding of their condition can be had that they may be properly assessed and taxed There have been a number of the bankers of the state before the committees arguing against state control and they claim that as they ask nothing of the state in the way of charter or other favors the state has no more right to exercise super vision over them than it has over any legitimate line of business The matter of builuiiig and loan legislation has re ceived some attention from the com mittee not however with reference to any special bill but iu an informal man ner and the committee has expressed it self as favoring lesislation to require the foreign institutions of that char acter doing business in this state to put up a guaranty fuud which shall be proof against fraud State institutions do business in more than one county are to be required to make stated reports and be examined by the auditor Local companies doing business in only the county in which they aie organized are to make reports but are not to be ex amined except on petition of the stock holders The senate committee has been con sidering the feasibility of cutting out the provision granting the right to ex empt debts from moneys and credits when listing the latter for taxation No decision has been reached on this point however In tho housed the part of the code re vision which refers to the conduct of the office of justice of the peace has been considered in committee of the whole and a good part of it adopted The revision as prepared by the commis sion has been amended in many partic ulars BO that the now law is nearly like the present One change is that the new law as passed by the house pro vides that a transcript to the district court can bo taken when the amount in controversy is as low as The pro posed revision provided that in drawing H jury in ft justice court tho plaintiff could call six men the defendant six tho justice six and out of these the jury was to be selected This provision has been stricken ont The committees on constitutional amendments in both have by a majority decided to report thn con ttitntional amendment permitting women to rote to both honnos for pM Constipation Causes fully Ivalf the sickimss in tte worUi retains the digested food too long in the IIOM and produces liiliiwstifss torpid liver ii Hood DA VIS TALKING gestion bad taste coined tongue sick headache in soinnia etc lloocls Pills cure constipation and all its results easily and thoroughly 25c All druggists Prepared by C 1 Hood Co Lowell Mass The only Pills to take with lloods Sursaparilla sage In the senate Senators Harper and Ranck the Democratic members of the committee have filed a minority re port dissenting from the majority of the committees Among the most important bills in troduced during the past week were three by Senator Juulrin changing the burden of proof of contributory negli gence from the plaintiff to the defend ant in all cases for damages against a person or corporation or against a telo graph company Senator Healy has also introduced a bill making express companies selling money orders amenable to the banking laws and requiring them to keep in all places where they do such business a de posit of which sum shall be sub ject to taxation The bill was prepared by the executive committee of tho State Bankers association JPIJES RICHARDS B udson Items The town caucus on Wednesday evening resulted inplacing the follow ing men in nomination For mayor J H Washburn for recorder W D Strayer for treasurer LR Peif er forr trustees F F Ward and Oscar Wood street commisioner Eobt McNalley They are all first class men and will serve the interests of the people well without doubt Mr aud Mrs Joseph Schenk of Ben nington township visited at their daughters Mrs Dr Sage over Sunday Dr JohnHildebraud was out visiting his parents Suuday Rev Bovee aud wife assisted by the pastors of the different churches are conducting a series of Union revival meetings Hicks Bros took out a machine dehorning cattle It was manufactured by Jno Kortick for them Carl and Symard Bedford aud Min erva McCartney were up from the Nor mal visiting their homes over Sunday The lawsuit betweeu Irvin Rowley aud Tom Cummings Saturday was de cided iu favor of Rowley who bad sued for some work done several years ago Mr Tucker the lawyer was through these parts the first of the week Louis Cornelius and his young broth er left for Nebraska Tuesday The Woodmen who went to Waterloo last Friday night were well treated by the Waterloo camp Our team did some initiating for them Several parties have visited Hudson during the past week looking at town lots Hudson is a good place to invest in such property as it is a fine place to live and tbe price of lots are steadily going up The timber on tbe Holmes place at the west of town is being cut down It seems too bad to spoil such an excel lent The men of the Universalist church have made enviable reputations for themselves in the line of cooks and waiters and they will sustain that record at the supper which they will serve at the church dining room next Monday evening from 5 to 8 Notice We desire to thank our patrons for favors extended us during our first year aud hearwith wish to announce that we will sell only at wholesale to tbe regular trade Persons knowing themselves indebted to us on book accounts will confer a favor by calling and settling same as we wish to close up outretail business Waterloo Saddlery Co Feb 171896 d3wl Wasliburn Tho weather is somewhat colder at present Mrs Wm Foulk was quite sick Mon day night Dancing seems to be all the go in this neighborhood at present three in one week Wm Holland was in this section buy ing horses one day last week Nick Berend had a colt killed by the cars last Thursday night In regard to the joint debate between the Washburn Literary Society and the Columbian Debating Club of Or ange twp the Orange boys have backed out Miss Katie Ash the Washbnrn school ieacber spent Sunday at her homein La Porte City Mr Hadley had a horse killed on the railroad one clay last week A New Life of Grant For upwards of two years tho pub lishers of McClurcs magazine have ooon quietly gathering material and picturesfor a now life of General 3rant many of them and other pictures relating to his life than has svor been made before The biography will bring out the real Grantin the same vivid thorough and interesting manner as Lincoln is presented in the now running in McClures They have boon fortunatfi in securing Jio cooperation of Col F1 Grant Who nan most of his fathers papers The iliiuitsotaSenator Addresses the Senate on the Monroe Speaking to His Resolution He ported From the Foreign Relations Committee Not Even Voluntary Concessions to Foreign Powers Are to Be Allowed WASHINGTON Feb the senate Mr Davis of Minnesota secured recog nition at 1 i0 for his speech on the reso lution framed by him enunciating the policy of the United States on tho Mon roo doctrine The senator left his desk in the rear of the chamber and took an advantageous position at Mr Halos boundary The cluiais of Grout Britain had shifted constantly and had in creased immeasurably in recent years i A mup showing the various claims of Groat Britain is bowi doring in its iutrl cicy Grout Britain hud never flxocl u i definite line and declared Hero is tho limit On the contrary sho had J pushed westward to the Orinoco j river until the British covered over 70000 square miles of Venezuelan territory Concerning j this territory Grout Britain asserted there should be no arbitration In ox I plaining the advance of the British i claims Mr Davis exhibited an old map and pamphlet prepared by Sir Robert Schomburgk showing the line surveyed by him Tho sssutor said ho was pleased to hear from across the water in tho report of the parliamentary do bate that concessions had been made which would tend towards a settlement Not on Linos of Clove and Message But if this settlement was based on ihat feature of the presidents message suggesting the propriety of a niutusil settlement between Great Britain and Venezuela tho people of tho United States would never agree to it It would amount to a territorial extension As a whole tho presidents message had desk near tho front and middle of the been unobjectionable but when that ciianiber He spoke without manu script or notes but bpfore him was a portforlio containing numerous cal papers to which ho referred At the outset Mr Davis voice was thin and sometimes inaudible but it grew in force and volume as he pro ceeded It is a matter of common observa tion said Mr Davis in beginning that each year our foreign relations in crease iu difficulty complexity and im portance This results from the growth of our nation and to the tendency of the times to bring together nations in BOC al and commercial intercourse It was this tendency said the senator explained the fact the United States was involved iu more difficulties with Great Britan than with all countries combined j He was glad to know however that the last mouth had brought some amelioration of the immediate difficul ties to which the attention of the coun try had been given If new con ditions wore founded on the Sionroe doc trine then they would receive the Warmest Approval of American roople but if they involved any concession f roni the principles laid down by Presi dent Monroe them the people of this country would visit upon such conces sion their condemnation aud disap proval Mr Davis said that as he understood the Monroe doctrine it was an asser tion by the United States that it would regard as an infringement any attempt by a European power to take or ac quire any new or additional territory on the American continent or any isands adjacent thereto or any right of sovereignty or dominion in the same and that such infringement would be deemed dangerous to the peace and safety of the United States llevlcwad Conditions In Europo The senator reviewed at length the conditions existing in Europe at the time of the entinciatioii of the Monroe doctrine He did not view the course of the British statesman Caniiing who favored the doctrine as inspired by love for this country It was a move in behalf of British trade then beginning to expand the world over Speaking of the criticism that the pending resolu t on contemplated a protectorate over South American countries Mr Davis said it would bear no such construction nor would it bring about such results It Suggested No Guardianship over Southern countries None of them was relieved from the chastisement of the war by the foreign country the only condition being that the territo rial extensions shall not result from such war There was nothing new or novel in the spirit of this doc trine proceeded the senator It was recognized and enforced by European goveanuients and Turkey offered a marked instance of the mu tual agreement to refrain from terri torial extension in the Ottoman em pire Mr Davis referred to the state ment of Lord Salisbury that the Mon roe doctrine is not based upon any canon of international law and the senator insisted that the right resided in any naton to interfere in the affair of another state when conditions arose dangerous to its peace and safety This was a recognized principle of interna tional law upheld by eminent English authorities from whom the senator quoted Referred to Hawnll and Cuba Taking up the islands of Cuba and Hawaii Mr Davis showed the consis tent and persistent course of theUuited States in applying the spirit of the doc trine to those islands It had been in voked in the case of Cuba whenever England or France had sought a foot hold there In tho case of HaMaii a resolution had been passed at the last session of congress declaring that the United States would not look with favor on any foreign intervention in the affairs of Hawaii Tho senator re ferred incidentally to the animosity of the debate over Hawaii and to the ef fort to restore to the Hawaiian throne a and Qunen If it was proper to pass such a resolu tion as to Hawaii why should a ques tion bo raisd as to tho policy of a firm nipernto umiexplicit enunciation of the application of tho Alonroc doctrine to tho pending didlculties Mr Davis took np ho Vonozuoln question and Outlined its rsfpntial features Venezuela 1md steaafastly claimed tho Essinuibo ntcr nn the document was scrutinized it would be found to contain a reservation excep tion and diminution of the fdonroo doc trme never before attempted by an American statesman except Calhoun This diminution of the original doc trine was contained in the presidents brief approval of a voluntary agreement between Groat Britain and Venezuela Voluntary Concessions Not Allowable It was 110 part of the Monroe doctrine that auy voluntary cession of territory by a South American stato to a foreign government was unobjectionable to the United States It was as much a menace if the extension of territory was voluntary aud peaceful ns though it were the result of conquest At the present time the adoption of such an idea would permit Great Britain under the pretense of a voluntary settlement to advance her territory in South America Venezuela is now tinder theduress of Great Brit ain declared the senator A British ultimatum has been addressed to Vene zuela What then could result from any pretense of n voluntary agreement when Great Britain dominated Vene zuela and the latter country was with out the power of exercising free will Mr Davis spoke strongly in favor of arbitration and pointed out the fre quent salutary results from arbitra tions He also referred to the several South and Central American states pointing out their progress resources and capa bilites Concerning the panding reso lution Mr Davis it in no way added to or diminished the original Monroe doctrine It made permanent by congressional enactment the defi nite policy of the United States thus ending the constant assertion by foreign jurists that the doctrine was ti mere dictum without ac ceptance by the American congress Recent reports had foreshadowed a treaty between Great Britain and Spain concerning Cuba by Which cer tain ports of Cuba were to be pledged to Groat Britain This declared Mr Davis would be the first step toward British acquisition Jt woud be iu op position to rhe spirt of Monroe doc trine sis it wiinld rentrd the destiny of Cuba There tVil bi no There has beeu much talk of war said the senator but there haH never been a possibility of war Neither gov ernment would permit it No Ameri can sodior would outer Canada New York could not put nnder contribu tion The Welland canal would not be seized These great countries will go on peacefully solving their difficutits To this end congress should lay down the Monroe doctrine as an essential feature of American policy In time of danger the surest road to peace was aw exact statement of our policy Mr Davis closed at having spoken two hours and was warmly congratulated by his associates Kiiglautl May Have n Commission LONDON Feb Times sug gests that England appoint a strong and independent commission to inves tigate Venezuelas dispute for the en lightenment of parliament and the public as early as the Washington com mission shall report Buckeye Works Burned MAKTIXS FEKRY 0 Feb Buckeye Glass works were destroyed by fire The works were to have started up Monday with nonunion hands The fire was of incendiary origin and the building was doubtless set on fire to prevent the resumption BRIEF BITS OF NEWS Only four cities of over 100000 inhab itants are represented in the United States senate Robert McLaughlin has confessed to the murder of his wife and her niece near Augusta Ky Ciionel Daingerlield Parker has been ordenxi home from1 the department of Texas to await retirement Tholvg soup lye and coffee essence nutnufiHti ry of P C Tonisqn Co PlrilidiHjhi burned The total loss Will IK uUvu On i mi tint llMWHllnii Inlnndi SAX FHANCISCO Feb steam ship Monowa hhs arrived from Sydney via Auckland Apia and Honolulu She reports all quiet on the Hawaiian Islands PROPOSED ALLISON CLUB A CALL FOR ITS FQRMATION The Republicans of Both Sides of the River Unite in a Call to Organize from Tuesdays behind the rest of the worlcTin tho Allison movement but will bo in the front rank with as fine a club as any in the state Tho agitation was started some weeks ago by circulating a petition for mem bers and sentiment has been growing in favor of such an organization ever since and tho following call has been issued To the Republicans of llic of Waterloo Iowa You are urgently requested to be pres ent at a meeting called for the purpose of organizing a local Allison club to be held at the city council rooms Thurs day evening February 27189C at eight oclock By order of WEST WATERLOO TOWNSHIP CENTRAL COMMITTEE EAST WATERLOO TOWNSHIP CENTRAL COMMITTEE Barclay Items The Canfiold creamery was sold to Stoner Wagner of Littleton and is being moved toBarclay Center where they intend operating it in the near fu ture Mr J P Thayer of Gordon Neb an old resident Of Barclay is visiting his rmmy friends after an absence of six teen years Tho youug people met at Parson Smiths Friday evening to celebrate St Valentines day They report a very nice time Mr Matt Weber and Miss Mary Buchiier were married at tho Catholic church in Barclay Wednesday Feb 12 They will make their future homo in Minnesota Their Barclay friends ex tend congratulations to them for a prosperous future Oscar Travis was very agreeably sur prised Monday evening A number of young friends gathered at his uncles and passed the evening in music so cial games etc Oysters and other re freshments wore served Mr John Wudo of Norfolk Nob and Miss Janie OKeofe were united iu marriage at the Catholic church in iu Jesup Tuesday morning Feb 11 with the brides brother Tado and Miss Kate Berry acting as best couple The bride and maid were elegantly dressed in cream silk and laco their only ornaments being a single pearl at the throat The groom wore the cus tomary black A bounteous wedding dinner was given at tho home of the brides parents at which fifty or more relatives aud friends did ample justice The young couple were the recipients of many useful and valuable presents which showed the love and esteem in which they were held by their friends Mr and Mrs Wade left for their west ern home Monday They have the best wishes of all for a long and prosperous life Mr Martin who lived on tbe Camp bell farm moved last week onto the Stubbs farm which he intends to work this year David May was quite sick last week but is improving The Presbyterian society of Jesup will have a sociable at A B Whitneys tonight Blaclihavvk Items Grandpa and grandma Virden cele brated their fiftieth anniversary on the 12th Grandpa has been a resident of Blackhawk for fortysix years and has been living at the same place since 1852 Art Lichty Harry Gross and Will Licbty of Orange spent Sunday at J L Beats Mrs Julia McBain has gone to visit relatives out on the Wapsy Wm Morris and family of Cedar Falls visited with Mr aud Mrs T H Filkins one day last week Miss Lucy Messcrly of Cedar Falls is visiting with her sister Mrs F Seufferlein Alice a little daughter of ins has been very sick but we are glad to hear she is recovering Sanford Stewart has been on the sick list for the past week Some of the neighbors had a pleasant party at G R Huntingtons lastFriday evening M M Beal and family left for sarfc today We hope M M will be able to resume his place of business again Grandma McBain is visitingjher son in Cedar Falls II N Buttorfield sold a cow and calf today for 832 Dave Fox is taking in a winter resort about fifteen miles west1 of Dos Moines Rev and MrsLovi Shaffer of Be atrice Neb are visiting among friends and acquaintances in this vicinity They left here in 1875 and this is their first visit Mr Shaffer has had sidorablo experience in frontlet life during the past twenty yearn He tells thrilling incidents of Uie drouth stricken people barlnc Uvtd In 8 MUST 001 We have a few Overcoats on our counters that we do not wish to carry over To close them out we will sell them AT COST AND LESS A few other winter gar ments will go at proportion ately IOAV prices The Palace 123125 East Fourth St Acts Powerfully and qtiicKljr euros wren all oilicrs tall Yuiing men will reital Ibeir lost manhood niidold ruen will recover iliplr Miithfnl vipor hy using VIGOIUNE Absolutely Guarnntetd to curfl loul Vitality Impoten cy NiRhtly Lost erFiullnit aienioryWaetiiisr Disc se and oH effrctstfst abuse or excises and imllscrrtinit Warns on Dont let Iruprglsis worthless sulistllute on yon lecnise 11 yMdam ereater profit Insist on iiavlnz V1GORINE or send for 1C Caw be carried Invest pocicci Piepn nlaln wrapper SI 00 pet purl aore or iiadcufr 55 00 with A Positive Written Guarant to Cure or BcfuuC tho Money Ciicbiarfr by J J tee ea HEUMATOX CUUES HEUMATISM ALL DRUGGISTS PRICE eat localities where crops have been a failure He wasat one time commis sioned to distribute aid to aud knows whereof he speaks A grand surprise was planned for Mr and Mrs L Shaffer last Saturday night Mrs D M Dierdorf had taken them to Mrs T H Filkins for tea Af ter the guests to the number of about fifty had arrived at the house of Mrs DierdorfE he went after his wife bring ing with him Mr and Mrs Shaffer to spend the night When they arrived they were not only met by a host of their old time neighbors but Mr and Mrs Filkins who a few minutes before had bid them good nightwere the first to greet them Mr D having arranged that Mr and Mrs Filkins should get in the house first It is needless to say that Mr and Mrs Shaffer were com pletely taken by surprise After spending an hour in social con versation the ladies repaired to the dining room and began to unpack well filled baskets which they had brought with them and the long table wan tl most made to groan yndcr its weigbtof good things a hearty repast being joyed by all present A social time wad by dl present until near the midnight when the company LMt delivered Mt able dtoeoWM   

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