Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Benton County Times Newspaper Archive: July 5, 1900 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Benton County Times

Location: Vinton, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Benton County Times (Newspaper) - July 5, 1900, Vinton, Iowa                              HAVING A GOOD TIME The THE FRANCIS To firum and heart heat A soldiermarches by There is color in his There isc6urage in Tet beat heart In amoment he must By starlight and moonlight He seeks the Britons He hears the rustling flag And the armed sentrys tramp the star light and moon light His silent wanderings With slow tread and still He scans the tented line And he counts the battery guns By the gaunt and shadowy And his slow tread and still tread Give The the plumed wave It meets his eager And it sparkles neath the stars Like of a dark a plumed On an emerald A sharp a steel clang And terror in the sound For the sentry In the camp a spy hath found Witha sharp a steel clang The patriot is With calm steady He listens to his doom In his look there is no Nor a shadowtrace of gloom But with calm and steady He robes him for the ID the long the still He kneels upon the Aid the brutal guards withhold Een the precious Word of God In the long the still He walks where Christ has Neath the blue the sunny He dies upon the And he mourns that he can lose But one life for And in the blue the sunny His spiritwings are But hislast his message They lest friendly eye Should read how proud and calm A patriot could With his last message A soldiers battlecry From Fame Leaf and from Angel From Monument and The sad of the glad of His history shall And on Fame Leaf and Angel Leaf The name of Hale shall ooooooooooooooooooooooooooowv O O O O O O O LEXINGTON AND ITS The village of Lexington lies about ten miles northwest of The first settlement was made there in 1640 near the site of what afterwards became known as the Buckman Tav There still remain in the village several wellpreserved houses which were standing at the time of the bat tle of Lexington 125 years They have been well cared for and have un dergone little They add much to the historic interest of the plate and are annually visited by thousands of The local historical society has placed tablets on them enumerat ing dates and facts of especial in Lexington Common is in the form of a triangle and stands nearly in the j center of the At the time of the fight on April it was an j open space and used as a drill ground for the Today it is a beautiful At the southern end of the tri angle is what is known as the Pulpit in the form of a granite pedestal surmounted by an open This monument stands on the site of the first three churches built by the Just behind properly is a thrifty elm which was set out by Grant 25 years ago on the centennial anniversary of the Near the northwest corner of the Common n the Minutemen mon at the foot of which are buried those killed in the It is Jy inscribed and bears the names of those whose last resting place it In Lafayette was given a public reception in front of this and fourteen survivors of Parkers shook hands with Near the northeast corner of 4Jbe Common is a huge boulder mark ing the place where Parkers men were drawn Engraved on the boulder is Parkers com mand to his Tbe original church on the Common had nosteeple and a belfry was erect ed In 17G1 a new belfry was erected on Belfry just to the west of the From this belfry rang oiif the alarm on that memorable morning 125 vears The belfry remained on the hill until 1701 then It was removed to the Common and Its bell was used to summon the peo ple to to toll for their funer and to tell them at 0 oclock each night that it was time to rake up the fires and go to In 1797 it was by a son of John Parker and removed to his re maining there for nearly a Then it was purchased by the Lex ington Historical restored to its original appearance and replaced on Belfry Three buildings of great historical interest stand one opposite each of the three sides of the To the past is the Merriam known at the time as the Buckman the LEXINGTON From which rang out the alarm on the night of April warning the Americans that the British sol were on their way from Bos of the It was fired on by the British regulars and the bullet holes can still be To the west of the Common is the Monroe built in A bullet passed through the glass over the door and imbedded itself in a The bullet and is in the possession of one of Monroes descend ants at At the north of the Common is tho Harrington the door of which the original owner died with his head in his wifes lap the morning of April Only 100 rods northeast of the Com mon is the famous HancockClark The original part of the which is now the rear as shown in the was erected in 169S bj John His son built the twostory front in Aftir John Hancocks death it passed into the hands of Jonas who had married Hancocks granddaugh The ministry of John Hancock and Jonas Clark extended over a pe THE HANCOCKCLARK riod of 105 Young John Han cock and Samuel Adams were hiding with Jonas Clark in this house when warned to flee by Paul Revere ADAMS John second president of th United was a man of great vigor and He was the most prominent advocate of the decla ration of in the Conti nental In the following ex Daniel Webster utters what he thinks might naturally have been Adams language while speaking on this Some of the members of of congress were of openly resisting the great power of They are stimulated by the most encouraging considera to go on and make the declara tion whatever may ue our b be that this declara tion will It may cost and it may cost blood but it will and it will richly compensate for Through the thick gloom of the I see tho brightness of the future as the sun in Wo shall make this a an im When are in our children will honor They will celebrate it with thanksgiv with with bonfires and On its annual they will shed gushing not of subjection and of agony and but of ex of and of before I believe the hour is My judgment approves this nncl my whole heart is in All that 1 and all that I and all that I in this 1 am now ready here to stake upon it and 1 leave oft as 1 live or survive or I am for the It is my living by the of it shall be my dying now and In dependence forever Hindoos The Hindoo is a strict The low caste Hindoo is a when the famine stalks abroad the Hindoo submits Day by day he will subsist on less un til at when a more he will drag his bony self to a relief sta There he may set he may If he crouches in some or out in the the trees and awaits the coming of The Republican national convention 1900 was shortest on when hours of time that it was in ses Aion are taken into It was called to order at and at took a recess to Wed nesday at At 3 Wednes iay a recess was taken to Thurs At on Thursday its work was done and the convention was adjourned sine No national con vention ever consumed less time in Of course the work of the conven tion laid before if so to put There was not the slightest doubt on any point except the vice and as soon as the delegates began to ar rive that doubt was Roose velt was the choice of nearly every delegation for second James the presidents an landed in this country about and settled later in Chanceford York where David greatgrandfather of the was born in The records of the Pension Bureau ihow that David McKinley was a sol dier in the revolution and participated In the capture of Paulus Hook and the engagements of Aniboy and Chester He died in in at the age of A James Mc moved to Columbiana in At that time his born in Pine Mer ger was two years James McKinley was an iron manu facturer or furnace and his son William followed the same When William was twentytwo years bid he married Nancy Allison of Can the couple having nine child of whom William the presi was the William Mc died in having lived to witness the rise of his son from a school teacher through posts of national prominence to be governor of The president was born at Trumbull on January He attended the public schools j in that town until he was nine years j at which time his father moved to Mahoning where i the future president entered Union i pursuing his studies in that institution until he was seventeen rears He is said to have excelled j in mathematics and and tu have bested all his fellowstudents in i debating the public questions of the j j In 1S60 he was sent to Allegheny but gave up his course after a few months on account of poor After a period of rest i he became a teacher in the public schools of the Kerr near Po having joined the Methodist Episcopal church in In the spring of 1S61 he was a clerk in the postoffice at which position he gave up to enlist at on June 11 of that in Company E of the Twentythird Ohio Volunteer ra William McKinley twice refused the nomination for president previous to the time when on the first ballot at the Republican National convention held in Louis in 1896 he was finally nominated and His first re fusal was at the convention of when he supported to whom he was forbidding the use of his name at a time when his formal assent or negative acquiescence was all that was necessary to secure his own At the ensuing convention of 1892 he received votes for the his name not having been as it was well known he was an support er of Harrison and would immediately withdraw his name should it have been Being the permanent chairman of the he was greatly embarrassed by the efforts of his supporters to make him the presi dential leaving the chair on the announcement of the re sult of the first made a motion to make the nomination of Harri son His motion was car On April McKinley intro duced into the House the general tar iff measure which has since been known as the McKinley For four months the measure had been un der and every interest in the including manufactur im free and pro had been freely the minority having been given as good an opportunity to present their views as had the His speech on May 7 in support of the measure sustained his reputation as an orator and dis passionate and seldom has such hearty applause beer accorded any leader as greeted him upon the conclusion of his McKinleys home life has been that of representative and almost He on January Miss Ida granddaughter of John for sixty years editor of the Ohio still published at Two Christine Ida and were born to and Mc both of them dying at early Roosevelt was born in New York of Dutch and ScotchIrish His father was Theodore after whom the governor was and his whose given name was was the daughter of James and Martha Bulloch of Young Roosevelt was primarily elucated at home under private after which he en tered graduating in Those qualities of aggressiveness which have marked his more recent years of public life were present with him in college and he was a conspicu ous figure among his It was an interesting period in the history of the party and the and young Roosevelt entered upon the political field with eagerness and en The purification of political and official life had been for some time an ideal with and with this came the belief in the efficacy of the application of civil service rules to executive eon In 1SS2 he was nominated for the State Assembly and was He served for throe ISSti Roosevelt was nominated as an inde prMident candidate for mayor of New although indorse by the was In 1SS4 hf was chairman of the New York delegation to the national Re publican He had been among those who did not regard Elaine as the most available candi date of the but after the latters nomination Roosevelt gave him his hearty and in the face of the remarkable defection in New York at that In President Harrison appointed hin civil service and he served as presi dent of the board until As president of the civil service com Roosevelt resigned in to become president of the New York board of police On May Roosevelt resigned his place in the assistant sec retary of the to muster in a cavalry regiment for the Spanish Life in tho west had rnade this a fitting As a hunter of big used to the saddle and the and an unerring shot with rifle and re the country refognixcd in him the making of a lashing cavalry load He had experienced military duty in the York National Guard in the Wood was put in com mand of the Rough Riders Roosevelt was lieutenant On June 15 the regiment sailed to join General Shafter in From the time of landing until the fall of Santiago the Rough Riders were giant figures in the Their work reached a climax on July Lieutenant Colonel Roosevelt led the regiment in the desperate charge up San Juan He had shared all the hardships of his and when he broke the red tape of discipline to com plain of General Shafters camp and its dangers from disease the army was with him and the war department lis tened to his On July 11 ho was commissioned colonel of vol Scarcely two months later the nev military hero was nominated for gov ernor of New In the convention he received 753 against the 218 cast for Governor Frank As a writer of outing papers his varied experiences on the trail have served him In his life of Thomas Benton and of Gouv erneur Morris have been Es says and papers dealing with political LAFE Nominated life have added to his Of his latest The Rough Hlders has been pointed to as one of the most thrilling pieces of military his tory produced in recent Governor Roosevelt has been twice His first wife was Alice Lee of who left a In 1S86 he married Miss Edith Carow of New There are six of whom are His domestice life is Whether ensconced in win ter quarters at Albany or New or at the famous Roosevelt summer home at Oystfr Bay on Long the lead er of tiie Rough Riders is an indulgent father and romps with his children with a much zest as the youngest I The youngsters are known as the Roosevelt half and all re flect in some manner the paternal The oldest girl is dark and serious She rides her fathers Cuban campaign horse with fearlessness and The next olive branch is ur voung the idol of his fath ers heart and a genuine chip of the old Young Teddy owns a trusty shotgun and dreams of some day shooting bigger game than his father ever He also rides a pony of his the oldest is nearly She is the only child of the first Young Ted dy the present Roosevelts old Mule CatcbM A mule patrols the beach at in quest of When she has found one she turns it on its and then ambles off to inform her A man never accomplishes much till he has got something behind him to be ashamed oL THE ROOSEVELT ROOSEVELT Oyster est is Then there are Ker 11 ft and of the tender age of Over Canal There is probably but one member of the house who enjoys the distinc tion of having tramped on foot over i both the Panama and the Nicaragua canal That gentleman is Rep resentative Romeo Hoyt Freer of West Not many years ago Judge Freer was American consul to Nica ragua ami during his term of offico he fnmiliamiil himself with the proposed canal Once he traversed the between the two oceans with a surveying of which Com mander Lull of the navy was at and again he went over the with only one a New Yort newspaper manWashington DISAPPEARING STOOL FOR STORES Perhaps the greatest objection mer chants make of providing stools for customers or even employes is that they block up the aisles and an Ohio Frederick patented a folding stool for such purposes which over comes this objection in a large de gree Though furnishing a tirm and I unyielding seat when in this stool automatically folds up out of tho I way beneath the counter as soon as j the weight of the user is removed I A novel feature of the dc sign is the double support for the scat j instead of the single end brace usual ly This enables the inven tor to hinge the seat in mich a way it thus takes up the smallest possible amount of valuable i To prevent the jar or shock when I the weight is removed from the i and the stool assumes a vertical po I sition too quickly a rubber cushion i i provided just under tho which i is fastened to one of tho two standard so as to take the blow as they coma together at that Dont Road When Thomas drove up to deliver the usual quart of milk the of the house kindly how many quarts of siilW do you deliver it And how many cows have you The gentleman made some remarks about an early summer and the state of the and then how much miiic per day do your cows average Seven urn said the as hd moved i Thomas looked after scratched his and all at once grew pale aaL he pulled out a lead pencil and begaii to figure on the wagon Nine cows is and I set down seven quarts under the cows and thats sixtythree quirts of I told him I sold ninetyone quarts olj milk per day sixtythree from ninety one leaves and none toj where do I get the rest of the milk Ill be hanged if I havent given myself away to one of my best customers by leaving a big cavity iaj these figures to be filled i THE VITAL git mah De ball dun hit me on de De ball hit yo on de j Forestalling Her Being a wise he desired to no Of you ha1 by way of that I have plenty of female she what I have four sisters went and any number of I realize all she but I fail to see how it interests only he Bei fore saying what 1 have to say merely desire to have it understood liatJ have my full quota of relatives of Do I make myself clear I think I grasT your sha In that he I will ask you to be my Pr liminary Thereto Id like to have my name changed from Louderschlegel to or something of that Can you ad vise me as to the necessary legal steps to be taken What is your may I in wanting it changed I am afraid the Society for the Sup pression of Unnecessary Noises will ba getting after Tribune An Off That graduate of the Indian seems to be a very well read Not Hes been sick all Philadelphia Severed I see the telephone wire Is dowa between your house and i Yes his wife and mine have exchanging cutting remarks Philadelphia tVlHre It was it wrote FOOla rush in where angels fear to tread must have been some feli low who had had experience in up the money to back a tlelphia SURE Uncle Bible am repeatln De Bible says Lijah was fed by a an dis heah Lijahs gwine toa be fed by a Does that new neighbor next door seem Joseph she strikes me as a woman who would think she could send strawberry shortcake by Onlte She has an open she Yes especially when she Philadelphia Tell Was the strike a Mike begorry there was nivver scrimmage jurin tho whole av I   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication