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Benton County Times Newspaper Archive: February 28, 1895 - Page 1

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Publication: Benton County Times

Location: Vinton, Iowa

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   Benton County Times (Newspaper) - February 28, 1895, Vinton, Iowa                              MATILDA MARY tiese cMs with fancy names remain only it bom pools and musieUrn choojo R As soul inspiring nd so she this lovely The best of all her cause they christened Matilda Mary helps her mother round the Sho does the fAnd tidies up the sitting When all the chores are Its there Seth comes Theres no meeting in the Nor nambypamby nonsense bout Matilda Mary bonnie Annie She lovely years it4 And or Daun or Were always pleased to And sweet Maries a nice t 35 But give ui something plain ets have a tune or two about Matilda Mary That Winter BY BOiiERT CHAPTER They are in mademoiselle They have cut the telegraph wires Lord deliver us In these elements of alarm Blanche j did not think of her nor of the j personal peril which might soon i threaten her her thought and care j was for her She prayed for j him While all the disj trict was in an and the chatI eau itself like a startled j old Hubert wildly holding forth and the female servants chattering in j she remained outwardly j seldom leaving the privacy of her own j But one still afterj when the first autumnal frost j was on the she left the chatj eau and walked out into the which looked beautiful in the sere and yellow Clad in a simple dress of black with an ivory her fathers suspended around her she seemed almost like a re Her only companion was an old Norman christened after her Aimlessly full of her own sad she passed down to the cliffs by the and standing near to the little looked down on the A diligence had just come and an excited group was gathered round it before the inn while people were moving to and fro in nil some Then glancing toward the she saw Father Andre at the conversing with a man with excited ges was eagerly pointing up the Valery j The sun was sinking over the j and inland the prospect was already j growing dark yet she did not hasten her though she now her face in the direction of Before she reached the wicket gate leading into the home woods the full moon had mingling its bright beams with the last faint rays of daylight Suddenly she was startled by the sound of horses and almost the same moment she perceived two men on horseback rapidly approaching across the The moonlight struck full upon them and Hashed upon some thing like glittering She knew at once that they were for their spurs jingled as they and each of them carried a long weapon like a Quick as thought she drew back among the and seizing the dog Gaston by the made it lie down at her They were Uhlans She knew them at once by their and the spears they carried for of the wild cavalry were fa miliar to her from the illustrated She had read and heard of the reckless deviltry and cruelty of these more than any other portion of the German had awakened the superstitious horror of the Fortunately she was safely and the strangers would have ridden by unsuspiciously hud it not been for the conduct of the la spite of her attempts to quiet Gaston be gun to show his and struggle for escape and as they pushed the he tore himself and leaping from the rushed fiercely at the horses Utterly Blanche remained in her hiding watching what in trembling As the dog darted showing his one of the horsemen wheeled swift as lightning and covered him with a There was a flush and a re port and the poor animal lay dead on the Crouching in the Blanche felt her heart swell with mingled hate and To her simple mind the men seemed scarcely re sembling rather the savage monsters of popular They spoke together for some moments to her terror she saw the younger soldier pointing eagerly to the place whore she lay and saying something whichwas received by his companion with an incredulous shrug of the Then she heard the sharp click of a and simulta neously saw the elder man ride close up to the pistol in Something dourly attracted his at for he uttered ti loud cx clamation in at the same time pointing the weapon straight toward the hiding place of the un lucky The other called to him as if requesting him to leave the but he was still looked straight into his cruel then unable to control herself any and ready to face her whatever it might she roseto her parting the stood erect before For a moment her fate hung in the bal ance his finger was upon the trigger and he was in act to But sud denly his companion uttered a cry of warning riding quickly to his placed a hand upon his Vogel he still in It is only a a Knowing now that escape was im Blanche stepped out from her and pale as but looking at the two for such they The elder apparently little moved by her sex and surveyed her from head to an angry scowl but the with a light leaped from his and leading his horse by tho walked close up to She mot his eyes without though it to hor as if her last hour had To her he ad dressed her in her native tongue which he spoko quite fluently and with the slightest possible Pardon but it is a late hour for one so young to be My friend here is impetuous and you have had a narrow escape with Will you tell me your and where you dwell His manner gave her courage still keeping her eyes upon his she drew herself up as she replied My name is Blanche de and I dwell at the chateau of The other Uhlan greeted her speech with a coarse and cried in which he spoke with a thick Teutonic accent The devil She has the little she fox Lift the baggage up on my and I wili carry her back to as his companion called answered with an angry and again addressing said quietly Do nst alarm My friend is an ugly but does not mean what ho He is a Blanche or he would not have killed my poor Gaston you mean the dog Then it was yours was the reply and as she gave Blanche gazed at the dead body through blinding man on horseback laughed Thank your that it was not you I out the cur he Vogol exclaimed the Uo you not see the youmjr lady is terrified lam not said I am and I do not fear the enemies of my Hartmanu looked at her with a quiet It was curious but his eyes were quite and his man ner more and more I am sorry that this has We I assure do not make war on women or chil or dumb animals Have you little one I have a answered He must be a careless I am to suffer you to bs wandering in the woods alone so perilous a He is vdth the army of the cried fighting for the fath Come Hartmann cried the mount ed Uhlan impatiently moving Hartmann prepared to remount his horse he again looked at Take my advice and hasten home more of our people are and there may be fresh I should be sorry if any evil came to Over there in Germany I have a dear sister of my Ho leaped into the with a nod and a rode away after his For some minutes Blanche remained All had occurred so sud that as yet she could scarcely realize the situation but as the truth dawned upon and she found her self safe and the tension of her strungup nerves gave and she began to sob Bend ing over the dead body of the she tried to discover any signs of but there were none it had been killed Her heart swelled with hate and indignation against his Ah she they are in deed those Germans11 Then she thought of the gen tle young man who had addressed her so and she recalled his parting there in Ger many 1 have a dear sister of my and this reminded her of what her own father had said to her before they even the enemy were and had dear ones to love them and to mourn them when they It Was growing for black clouds were drifting rapidly up from the She remembered the strange officers after one last look at the dead she prepared to hurry buck to the when the sound of a voice arrested Ah it is Thank I have found it have been searching for you through the village look there is terrible The accursed Uhlans arc upon us in swarms The Uhhins said I for they shot poor She tunned as she and pointed to the dead hound which lay at the newcomers The man looked at the animal then he turned to his mistress with a sinister saw ho I was crouching in the bushes yonder and saw them It is well for Mademoiselle that you were otherwise one of them would be lying where Gaston ies I had my gun point ing at the monsters and I did not lire because I thought of But I shall remember and you shall be The girl Thank God I was she It would have boon too terrible What is to slay theenemies of our country The my has gone to do it why should not I Ah but that is My father is lighting in fair and open battle he would not slay an enemy from behind a The man blushed sheepishly and looked He could not say what was in his or ho would have I care for my but I care more for These men have made you shed they have filled your heart with sorrow and for that I would shoot them like Although ho was still a young he was the girls senior by several and all uis life had been spent in the forests of His father and grandfather before him had been keepers of the and in the ser vice of the Do For the ho was a handsome and endowed with all the man liness which comes of the occupation of Ho could have his pick of the village but his heart was entirely devoted to his young Almost ever since ho could remember he had had the care of her for when she was quite a little and rode forth mounted on her ponys back to have a gallop through the she was intrusted to his charge for the chevalier would say with a Take care of Houzel I look to you to bring her safely back And during those rides and when Houzel had played the with her artless had taken captive the young keepers and had re tained as she passed from childhood and bloomed into a beautiful his hopeless love deep Have you been into the Housel said Blanche creeping nearer to his I passed through the village in search of When I heard thai you had left the I was in terror lest the Germans should molest And my dear young he Let us go into the shelter of the Do not I will see that you are And poor she said he can not be left I should like him to be carried home and buried in the close to the I will see you safe madem oiselle then I will Ieturn for the hound and do as you Come He shouldered his gun and held forth his Blanche laid her hand on and the two walked away to They soon reached the Their arrival was opportune for the alarmed at the protracted absence of their had armed themselves with headed by old who was trembling with were preparing to set out in search of With a low bow to his mistress and a contemptu ous look at the quaking figure of the old Houzel turned from the chateau to retrace his steps through the forest when the voice of his mis tress arrested 1 AVould it not be better to go in the Houzel she said There may be danger for you The young fellow shrugged his There is always danger when such canaille are he day light or it is the But do not fear for mademoiselle I can protect And lie pointed to his Blanche Be it so but come to when you that I may know you are Flushed and Houzel retraced his steps along the road which he and Blanche had All was quiet and the moon was shining The hound lay where he had and Houzel saw now what he had not noticed a white filmy substance lying near the He lifted it up it was Blanches hand and it was still wet with her TO BE An Eye With Depend upon said the benignant old gentleman who was addressing the Sunday we are fashioned by a wiser power than our There was no mistake made in putting us If our hands were placed where our feet arc and our feet where our hands how could we get along It would be exceeding ly children exceedingly I stretch my hand out this I move my lingers what is it an evidence children was no and after waiting a moment the speaker answered the question It is an evidence of Dont forget chil he It is an evidence of Suppose for instead of having lids and had How could I use them You could use them in running your eye over the congre couldnt you replied a deep ly interested little boy near the What Paper Is Made There arc something over patents covering the making of It may be under some one of from the leaves of trees from hop bean pea i vines from the trunks and stems of Indian corn and every variety of grain from clover and timothy and more than 100 kinds of grasses from straw and cocoanut fibre from fresh water weeds and seaweeds from shavings and asbestos from thistles and thistle down from banana tobacco stalks and tan bark from old sack ing or bagging and from almost any other imaginable ABOUT TEE CAMPFIKE REMINISCENCES OF MARCH AND Socrates in A eostermonger was summoned before a London for obstructing the His own account was that lie went into pub lichousc to light his When he came constable threatened to summon What for says For stoppin1 the line of he I Where is the line of trattio1 its gone ahead says I Then ow could I uve stopped then This socratic costermonger got off with a He seems worthy Of better Gorman JJeil An amusing1 instance of Herman red tape is by the Berlin Keuestc A Munich came to the registrar of births to report an addition to his Beinp asked as to his religion he de clared himsolf The of looked over his list of but could find no pigeonhole for Christ and as the man was neither a Catholic nor a member of a Frotest i ant there was a groat Old usages of modern slang words turn up in unexpected quarters some Most of us think that the word jolly in tho sense of ex is of recent date but in a serious theological work of two hun dred years Trapps Com mentary on the Old and Now Testa ment 1G567 we read All was jolly quiet at Kphosus before Paul camo We have heard tho same phraso from a schoolboys month applied to a maiden aunts tea tho First had no business to fight Ho was out of Second Didnt expect it to como off for fives Did you have much on Pictures of Service in the South In Forty Eight Times In One Buttle The ttucle Snuff Unwritten The siege of in the summer of produced many inci dents of a tragic or laughable not recorded in books of history or personal And it is just such faithfully which give tho general reader of later years an insight into the life and spirit that prevailed during such trying as the writer in the Na tional Tribune remembers was truly a city with hills which bristled with cannon of various cali from the smallbore rifled Par rott gun to the 04pounder And what a din thej could produce on the least provocation The Confederates had much the advantage in point of knowing the teirltory occupied by hence their often unwelcome accur ate marksmanship made manj a poor fellow bite the dust even when not in One such incident occurs to me General to conceal some movement about to be ordered some regiments to march in a circle around a to give tlie impression that he was massing troops on our This eontiflusd for several The rebels soon practiced their marksmanship on these helpless and hapless ere we heard the zip of the bullet and next the horrible sound as when a man is struck whom we see fall either dead or But this did not check the It was a standing order to be in line at 5 oclock in the to be counted and assigned to picket or other My the Sixth lay at the edge of a behind a stone before which sharppointed stakes had been set at a certain and these tied to gether in long rows green Behind us at some distance rose an other much higher on which were situated General Howards headquarters and the signal corps Thera were no woods right in our hence we had an unob structed view of the rebel intrench and we could get a view for miles to our and often discover the smoke puff from a heavy siege gun that was the habit of paying its unwelcome respects to us early and because we were on high But for good shooting and foolish recklessness this instance will be in point S oclock in the one while we were lying behind our to avoid both stray and aimed which flew pretty thick at this we on the hill of the generals a man coming part the way stop in plain sight o and black the gen or some We waited with great interest what would come when to our as tonishment we heard the swish of a and following its direc tion we saw it bury itself directly under the seat of the man who sat with his feet down We held our expecting to see the man boots ily in pieces from an exploding But it did not and soon we saw the man emerge from the running at topspeedfor the amid the cheers of all who saw thj shot and its lucky Not all the men killerl on our side were laid low by the enemys as the following will show Toward the close of the a few days before the battle of theiv came orders to a certain battery of Parrott rifles to thv a number of rounds into the Now this battery was postd about r0 yards in the rear of a regi ment of and on our who also had consisting of logs piled one on top of the man in front of which was a bank of and in front of this a deep About this while the shells were iiyinsr over the heads of the man lying behind this there was one man who was polishing up his gun for this was his last day of ser and tomorrow he would be on his way lie had been a faith and brave and all regretted to part with Hark What was The report of a and immediately the sound of an exploded shell in our own right among the men We hurried md saw a sad and horrible There sat our man with gun still in but the shell bad struck his aud left only the headless trunk sitting Poor he went to his long never saw his earthly home This created a profound im and many were the expres sions of sorrow at the seeminglyun deserved cruel fate of our ybtneonc had and some one had died for One morning early the tired and exhausted from the heat of the previous day and slept later than not hearing the morning His was a small con sisting of a narrow foundation for a log house just wide enough for one man to lie over which was stretched the half of a This erection was against the some thirty yards behind the breast It was a fail but not intended for such when On this while still there came a swishing noise right over the sleeper and the report of the impact of the missile into the hill behind the How he got out of such low and narrow quarters he is not now even able to But the laughter that greeted him by the men who stood in line under arms rvill never be On locating the ball where it had struck the hill found it had glanced con tinued over the hill and knocked off tho legs of one of the who was cleaning a horse at that It was a narrow one of but not so soon Such forcible and effective calls were not received with that kindly spirit of nor was the human im pulse that would hasten the sluggish sleeper to arouse always appreciated with that generous promptness that would have gladdened the heart of those early and vigilant cannoneers of that distant Jeff Davis Trap for On the Cth of one of the rebel journals in Richmond said that whether General Grant in tends to advance or h preparing to retreat from he must he defeated either on the south side of Tennessee or on his retreat to Nash General Grant no in tention of About this time the rebel president paid a visit to Braggs to ascer tain the true condition of and it is reported that the following scene occurred on the top of Lookout moun tain Looking down one bright day from the lofty eminence commanding a clear view into four a very distinct view into the saw Grants army almost at his feet across the valley working like beavers on their I have them said in jtst the trap I set for To which LieutenantGeneral Pem who was sitting on horseback beside replied you are commanderin and you are Yon think the enemy are in a and can be captured by vigorous I have been blamed for not having ordered a general attack on the enemy when they were drawing around me their lines of cirumvallation at Do you now order an attack on those troops down there below and I will set you ray life that not one man of the attacking column will ever come back across that ex cept as a Tri The Bugle Sang The gray ara riiin tho day is far And the stars are abroad like dim clusters of The bivouac cleams over valley and heiiht With in the flare of its liiht While far from a in silver Floan a binle sous siasiui of Sweet In clear modulations its intoning Oer hillside and valley the echo Till the dim with the Just mellows the air to her pickets of cray And outposti ar3 bushed with the echoing tone Of busle notes wininj the countersign The sonT weaves it crystallized words in the It opens the portals of visions so That uplands grow sweet with the pressure of Soft eyes asain beam from wars cruel eclipse While far over hillside and vale is the tone Of note freighting their incense of Home The riverline and the soft mists that rise Are tinted with visions of faraway The Blue and the throuzh twinim Bulses cadences melt from the altarlike While stars seem to frora out their trreat As the bujle of Afar up the o er hillside and It captures the deepthrobbing hearts of the And many a face that held wars cruel Grouped there by the bivouac under Goda Wore a tenderer as the bule notes blown Led the dream ot the battlescarred veteran and Swamp The Swamp the eight inch Parrot during the civil created astonishment and something more in by sending a shell yards into the streets of city from a battery near Morris is now said to be an ornament to a drinking fountain in A story is told of its construction that may bear retell The colonel of a New York en gineer regiment was ordered by Gen eral Gilmore to prepare a lodgment for the gun in position nearly a mile out in the Carolina and to make requisition for all needed ap The colonel viewed the scenery from the nearest dry and sent in a requisition for 200 men thirty feet high to work in a swamp twenty feet He was placed under arrest at once by General Gil and had a hard time to placate his Wounded 48 Times In One One of the most remarkable charac ters in the United States is an old soldier known to the men of the East as Comrade Chase served in a Maine battery during the and carries the scars of nearly 100 fortyeight of which were received in the single battle of During the period of conflict he is said to have received more wounds than any other man who fought on either and lived to tell of his marvelous and exhibit his numerous scars in proof of his wonderful Louis Re What Sheridan An American gentleman recently went over the field of Waterloo with a who that he escorted General over the scene of Napoleons great What did General Sheridan say asked my He must have said he only It was agood place for a Indianas In the war for the Indiana had 12i5 regiments of infantry with men thirteen regiments of cavalry with men one regi ment of artillery with men twentysix companies of artillery with men also men in the navy Of died or were killed in I oat and Company wants to know who has his which was taken from him at the time of his August after the taking of the Weldon by the Union Correspondence with a view of obtaining said What are you doing inquired as he saw a friend tip a dry goods box on cud and proceed to malic a sketch of Attending to replied his an archi tect Im engaged in making a sign for a new modern office HOW THE ALAMO MISSION WAS A Handful of Heroic Toxans Fought for Independence Lunch Arthur Took ot Hlm Boys The Battle of the It is a safe wager that nine out of every eleven boys who are proficient in thejase of a bowie knife have not the slightest idea where the instru ment got its Colonel Bowie of Texas fame gave the knife its And when one writes of the Texas one must needs think of the battle of that heroic fight of which our American boys and girls seem to think so little and half of them know nothing They read how the brave soldiers fought and held the pass of Thermop but they seldom think of how a mere handful of men defended the Alamo How they dropped fighting on their then died facing the If you should go to the historical city of San Antonio in Texas yon will see the old mission building standing with bulletpierced a monument to the 172 heroes of Behind these walls the most import ant battle in the war between Mexico and Texas was This was when Santa Anna was president and the Texans were fighting for their in Here it was that Colo nel Bowie ended his brave dying with his boots on and fighting under the most terrible The story is every American child should know it by that hs may tell it with pride when other nations are talking of their great deeds One hundred and fortyfive men under Captain a young man of were holding the town of San Antonio against General Santa Anna and They were the only defenders of the town and were ensconced in the old mission of the Davy Crockett was also with and Colonel who was wounded and stretched out on his cot Of artillery they had only four teen Santa Anna demanded but the little garrison held out for ten skirmishing secretly for food and Every shot sent out of the mission house but not one of the Alamo heroes was hurt Pa tience and were being rapidly Some of the little band were falling others were Reenforce xnents had been appealed but none had Colonel with 300 men and four pieces of ar had started in answer to the but had put in somewhere fbr fresh water and food At last Captain Smith joined the exhausted band with thirtytwo Three days after General Santa Anna ceased the taking advantage of Captain Travis called his men into line and frankly owned that there was no earthly hope for them that he had led them into this thinking that reinforcements were on the He does not utter one word against Lamein for failing him he simply gives them their choice of They can surrender and be shot or be killed fighting out their The captain drew a line and said Every man who is determined to remain here and die with me come to me across that Every soldier but one crossed at When they finished Colonel Bowie looked with his arm in a and dont leave Wont some of you carry me across And the ouly backward step they made was to fro over the line and carry the colonel to the young cap tains The man who was a dropped over the wall into a and was verily the only man who escaped to tell the And then came the terrible Santa Anna brought all his forces to bear on the The scaling ladders were again and again but those who placed them were shot down like Four thousand men charring into 175 seemed easy but it soon reduced the four At last numbers and the Mexicans climbed over into the The little band of defenders were trampled on and but they dropped to their knees and hacked and shot and pierced until the pile of the dead was awfuL Colonel too weak to rise frora his leans on his well and marks his man every time he pulls the trig he continues to kill until the pistol drops and the breath leaves his Davy Crock standing in a fights like a and the backed against the surrenders only when run through and The great battle is The Mex icans have Out of the 172 Texans 172 are No Spartans were braver or more for they killed 522 of their enemies and wounded five hundred was finally and when ever great deeds thrill young boys they should think of that splendid piece of American and as Houston said to his men Remember the Clax in St Louis Ono Pis My neighbor has a He also has a mother pig and her little piggies and thereby hangs the story I am about to One little pig was not so large or so strong as the and he was jostled and crowded about until he could get very little to He could not grow like his for his appetite was never He squealed his protests loudly into the of his selfish brothers and but not one of them gave Even the mother could or would remedy the and poor piggie xvcnt squealing against seeming to grow smaller and thinner every day until he was spoken of only as the little runt It was very evident that he would be far in the rear when his mates reached porkbarrel unless there came a The thought was hard for a spirited pig to and ashis kin would give no he set about finding a remedy him Like earnest was what change Our piggy cetuaff his sides expanded in a wont sugges tive manner and lie began tpgrow fat and I wonder what does ail that complained ITftnner one fed her but shesboen drying up for a week or BOBW thing funny about too she gives a good deal of then nothing at alL What can the matter be mystery was solved when piggy was eepied sitting erect as any milkmaid minus the milking as J No wonder the cow gave ncunilk no wonder the runt grew fat Then the smart little pig was shut but he will find some hole to crawl oat and as I look from mywin dow often see my neighbors cow searching for corn in the closely accompanied A December Arthur was not very but he felt for he had jnstpaton first pair of He was going out that morning It was but lived in Southern where summer lasts all Mamma was dressing the baby Papa was harnessing Youll have a good time he said you will only have to take care of thet I can take care of Mamma hope my little boy will be very good and enjoy Jhim she When they came to a very steep grade Arthur drew in his but he only sayl I guess the babys When all the party had reached canyon they had a some of them went to gather wild Papa wentJwi1piJtnenv but mamma with and took care of After a time they came back with their hands lull of beautiful Where is Arthur asked mamma when papa brought her a large bou Arthur I thought with AndI thoughthe went said Havent you seen him since we left said Hes been gone Up with all these gullies and steep banks And the mountain cried And the rattlesnakes said Aunt Mamma laid the baby on the lap robe and began to scramble up the Then she ran back and picked the baby up and tried to carry Papa was almost out of hearing one way and Aunt Sarah as far off in Everybody ran and shouted and looked up and under the bashes and behind the After a long time they all came back but and with no At last papa with Arthur asleep in his He had found him a mile at the foot of the in the signalhouse on tbe The colored man there was telling him stories and Arthur had the mans old slouch Mamma kissed him and cried over That waked I thought I was big and could take care of myself he A Royal Now my pray what do think You will scarcely believe what I When I tell you this wonderful I lunched Wih a kirijr and a The palace it was rather And only a few feet squarei And some bread and cinger and jam Were all the royal The butler was grand in a necktie And prove as a judge could be But he had four looked very much Like our own old The king was dressed In a gorgeous And the queens was And they both had beautiful golden crowns That didnt exactly fit Their manners were grave and Their appetites royally Though the queen got her pinafore stained with And his choked himself And after the luncheon thecares of state Had tired her mavhap The queen unexpectedly fell With her curly brown head In my lap For she Is so you the king Explained in a grave She doesnt remember her part very well And he looked much Till quite forsetting his Sat down on the nursery And played with a top and a of cars For fifteen minutes or Then fearing my visit muht last too For he seemed to be I And the queen woke up in a fractious mood My call to an end I rcourtesied low to the and kissed 1 Her majestys hand SO But they sprang on me with a laughing shom And hujged me close and The queens gold crown slipped over And the kings from his head was And the royal cheeks were red as a And the royal locks were The royal robes from their shoulders And their royal dignity And Wasnt it mamma they My own little Trix and Ted in Youths A Boys Ideal The Buffalo Express says a boy of that city who was asked to write out what he considered an ideal holiday dinner menu evolved the following Furst Mince Second Corse Pumpkin pie and Third Lemon turkey and Fourth Custard apple chocolate cake and plum Dessert A Few Kcaaoas Why does salt melt ice asked a little girl the other It does not melt but by making the water salt ice cannot be formed unless it ia much colder than would be required to freeze That seaport towns are not so cold in the winter as many places and why we have so little ice in onr rivers and It does happen more than four or five times that the East river is frozen so that people can walk across tbe ice to Of course the strong rent has much to do witn tmfc the salt water has   

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