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Pocahontas Record: Thursday, August 28, 1919 - Page 1

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   Pocahontas Record (Newspaper) - August 28, 1919, Pocahontas, Iowa                                 /  Ir  5L. 36 NO. 20  POCAHONTAS, IOWA, THURSDAY. AUGUST 28, 1919  REVONOC  The oil stove wjtlii the patent Kôrogas Buraer  Do  This stoye burns 400 ;>alllon's of air to one gallon of Icerosent; oil and makes a lara:^ amount of blue flame directly in contact with  cooking vessel. Perfect coinbustion. Host econom^al stove. Coaks at: )5iuch less cost and fastef than any other staye or any other lueL  Come In and see this stove and let us demonstrate it for yoii. Easily operated'and coa-trolle'cf.  We want you tq see this stove before you buy. We Sharpen. Lawn Mowers  GOODYEAR &Wi£Gi  HARDWHRE  RI YARD  ; Buy your winter's supply of coal now. It [ Issafer to know that you have it than to [think you can get it. It may be ¿carce this winter.  Tankage and Mill Feed on Hand  » * * >-,»■-*. Kepler B. C. Kepler  ■ KEPIEE & KEPLEK iPhysicians and Stugeons  -"s; Office No. 24, Eesldence No. 104  EALSTON & SHAW  Attornoys-at-Iaw Will practice in Federal »nd State Courts:  * *  ■ » « * « * • '  w. 0. rUEMAN Dentist  (^es: Office 246. Ees. 130  » « « * « •  HGDSOH & HUDSON Lawyers Spoc'lal attention to trial, Probates and settlement of estates Pooahontaa, Iowa  • *  BD  essa'  Our terms are still coal cash. [Othar material thirty days net. [If you are building: our terms lot thirtf.diysfro]^ the time i^t® it comt^leted but  rou  Commimity Sel-yice Plans  All over the coUritry Iji ji-'hl, people are organizing town;: ;)iul villages for better eommuulty vvfu'.': in soino places the fundaincnail i - eco -notnlc, to get farinliiiv ou : kjuhJ';;-  baiila, apply" modern ........... ,;.-cin-■  co-ioperatlon in buying nu.l et<5.  lA other places viiiago n;ipi-o%-t'iiient is the fundamental ided.'li; ih.' .own looks raggud and nin down, tlio organization dovotoa ItKclf to Clcan-np pli ns, pahiUnf? o£ hov.so«, b.tni:' and tences, impiovomcnt of public squaroa, sti-eotH, parlis and back yai-ds.  Still another form oC development is luakins.ah uUcri;;.Uni', koc;«] an;l edHcationai lil'u. j.2.,ny ¡.Im.er', Duii were near the army cru'. oumai':; liUl much during tho wur ihe  of the War Oamp f-iin.'- utiitv f;iu'-vice. They bad cniin. .„!•,i;.y h: ijis, conimuuiij- liani; , ; iJiItt..' ':< '.s. boy scout and girl ;mnil tions, ptfgeanis, i r :ii,(i it "  tures. They hoc hou' ¡i,:lp:i.l .:U ili!-; Itihd of v.'orlt wa;i, ,li;cy vaiir t cun tinufid, iiiid arc toriaj:-.!; pr, .ii i'i-m orgarii::;i.i io (;i.ny H on  in in„.i.- r-Li(;(!K baiUl;:o!p.,' (u^;!; Hoiscs live liehiE put up io so' ve ..ho civio feiittir fur tli'; m jioi;; (.own, anil tbo lin^iie for tii';- ivn iai auti or!-';.ini.zai-On r.'ork.  The ordinary coinit y n n'.cr "..iid Kuiail oily may net lie [o ai.-  tenipt anything .¡Jut n(  least it should stn.'.y ilie i.i, Ju.;lr and results of the V,';.r r,-i;-..i> i miinity work, .and appi" ;t »a possible. In a yeac '.vinu v ))i,tts..->. where thne are :;iiu:;,",i.;i;.; c!uiic]m>s, too many Cc:r the to ,. n lo suppoi t. one the weaire.ot of liieiu .luglit l.o (;lo>,o up and ,iíl'lr^f:ll'l. e ^ vUb the rest i'hat ivoilld leave a |)ab:ic linihiiii.:; available as n. rh!'; ter.ter. Tiii-c are linpii of woi'Ii to (ieve o:) moi-: here in Poealinnu; . I v.-ryHiin.!j done to nial:e Fo' iai life aiove iai:.'r-esting airl v liine;;;i:iu. to;- li.e yDUng people,he'p:i (o bui!.!i i.he future of Jie towa on a ■»C'-.y ."oilj  T. B. Thornton was a visitor Pooahontaa, over Sunday.  in  Mrs. I. H. Brokaw was a vi.situr Dea Moines, the last of the week.  in  Miss Rertlia Bowers vlalted ovi-Svinday with friends in Sac City.  Mrs. F. M. Starr has been laid iip for some time with an injured ankle.  W. A. Elliott went to Dea Moines, ."Vionday. to help swell the croU'd at the big fair.  Donald Sinclair of Jasper, Minn., visited friends liere and at Palmer, several days last week.  Pocahontas and vicinity is being v, oll represented at tlie State Fair in De.s Moines, thi.s week.  IJert Peters, a former employe in the llemocrat office is now working for uie teieplione company.  Ci,  V.T 1 ■ I  ly e.otinty supervisors iiave confi to buy twenty-two Empire i' ihacines at $86 5 each.  •.'I'e  it Uf  ■¡ate council of the American V ill hold its state convention .'iioincs, September '! and 5.  igni-  i'Oli SAT.E--Atwater-Kent fion ¡system for Ford car.  Ford Auto Co.  , The Elmer Larsion family left Sun-•iay, by tWc auto route, for a few days visit with relatives in Boone county.  The Manson fair Is on in full swing this weelc and offers some excellent attraction»! It will close on I<-riday.  IjiiiiDi- Day will be observed at Fon ila l)y tlie Harvest Home Picnic, an uria! iMÌ'a.ir held by-the Catholic Par-if li al liiat place.  Pioin otiiig' 0;iimisj-j.  The luanufacturers' id a  recent editorial, takio ) i'e^ r,' '>ntid tliat what saved tiie ITaiied btatcy from a period of atlast spring was tlic policy ol' aaverllsing. It calls attention to Ihe appeal issued by the government to business aieu that they should advertise irceiy. Last winter the linancial .lutlu'ok was very doubtful. It was .steneraUy cxpectid that the relfease of t.lie soldiers ar.d the closing of the war work plants, would create an enormous amount of unemployment.  The government took the position that what liic people needed was con-ildouce, and thai, liberal advertising would tend to promote that feeling, and would stimulate a buwylg movement that would keep all the industries busy.  As the result of the government appeal, or of ordinary bu8ine.ss sense, the commercial interests of the country have done an unprecedeiited amount of advertisin.;; siuee January 1. And this must have been one cause of the tremendous buying movement that has set in. Ccitain-ly never before has .-<0 much money been In circulation.  Conftdence is as t:onta'''i(>n3 as fear. Optimistic adverii ,1,; spreads abroad the Idea that a ing to be good, it usually There is of course sneii undue optimism. But and iear promote a great industrial disaster than courage. "Bwey man who makes It his roundation that there is always a mari-et for good goods, and the;e alway s wi!l be. Everyone who goes ahead witii faith In that Idea, encouragej many others to buy freely and plan for future needs. And v.-hen people are doing that, business can't be l)ad.  Definition of r. Bocai.cv A booster is a c'.tiia -i wlin tal!".'. a-strong for Beaver Crossing ! en )ic Is at home as he uoe^ Le '00  miles-away a.^.d viiT >re, - a.  A booster Is a •»••.11 •viw cji- -vh -o know that by helpL:-;; h s .-o -uirni;', he is helping hin-.!u:lf, o.nd 'l m acr„ on that knowledge.  A booster ii'' a man v.'ho '.-ojit^'ibi' tea to the reii.'iioMS, social, .ci-.a.rit.-'i'-; and comr.iercirl undert;'l:iii!,s . t city in pioponfon lo hi.s nier.iis.  A ocoater is a ntan who v, 1!' lo.; the "We spirit' douiimte i i , thot.«, and aclitm i-.nd will woric in h irinony  IS go  's,  a. i:i'!!S  tie vi mere hepo ai.à auvt ri ;; ea principle  t\ Anderson and son from near I'oaieioy, who u.sed ttj live in Shor-iiian township, were visitors in Poca-iiontas, Monday, and callers at this office.  The man who gets mad at what the newspaper says about him should return thanks three times a day for what the nev/spaper knew about him and suppressed.  Miss Ruth Mclntire left on Thursday of last week for a visit at the iiome of her grandmother in Des Moines and to sec some of the sights at the state fair.  J. A. Crowther will have a poultry car on track, today, Friday and Saturday and is offering the following prices: Hens, 23c; springs, 23c; coclts, lie; ducks, 18c; gee.se, 12c.  " Mrs. J. H. Allen returned to her home in Des Moines, last Saturday, She was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. H. C. Gilchrist and Miss Maude Gichrist, who had visited here for several days.  C. E. Bradley, a former employe of the Lange & Hunt barber shop, but who served in the'Marine Corps during the war, visited friends here several days last week. His parent." home in in Texas.  One of the attractions at the Alta fair, last week, was a horse shoe pitching contest The flrst prize was divided between Storm Lake and Galva, the Alta team carrying off the balance of the honors.  The First National Bank is now nicely located in its temporary (lUart-ers, the old poatoffice room, one door tractor who has charge of tlie remodeling has a good force on the ,1t)b and the v.'ork will be pushed along just as rapidly as possible  The daylight saving bill after be-ng vetoed by President Wilson the -lerond time, has finally been passed by a two-thirds .majority by both the Senate and . the House. After the 30th of October the clock can be turned back one hour to stay.  FOU SALE—Three choice 320 ■ve farms in Calhoun, Pocahonta.<^ Wright counties. Good improve  tie';  Mid thoroughly tiled. These M e on the market for a short . V Phone 2 8 or write J. C. ■^<rroll, Iowa. 20t3  fOi  an  in^ iayet from the day you i^l and settle that  mm  with his fellov/ citizen munity betterment,  A boosti.'r is a man v. a.i iieir keep his citr .dea:j mora) y ' physically.  A. booster is a. mm ... c.-r"!.  A.booster iii'caniij'is i-! 'lia cvHi-  cisiu of those willin;: in ^.e ve  'A booster is a mr..!i li'' iioii, <.'ei; in Beaver Crossir.g dllxciv.- :.■. •! believe.! fhat his Jiov'te >(riv:i i.s tlie placA in the whole wide vorkl. Tliut's a loyal booster.  A bcoster !;■ a I'lan who 1 r.t-.'vc; in woric, faith, than'y. that d.ay lollo.wr night; that time heais; that huma,iu ty contains more good thi-.n tad ami tiiat (his old ivorld is a ini-.rhty «KOd place to live 1;;.- -1. ;rie •, I'CAVer Cro.sBing, Nebr.  FARMS FOR SALE.  We have a fine solcction of aJowa anil Southern MlnnervOta farms- for sale at prices and terms that will suit the mose exacting buyer.  Make arpangementB with ub for a trip Of inspection of those lands at <uice as theao landa arc fast ndvanc-InB Jn prlee. Delays are expensive.  GAMSElEATir - AlfBEKSON BBOS. ^^ lAHD CO.  Phone 44 or 845 Pocahontas. Iowa  .'.1 •• SW ------—--— .  Howttlrd M. of Storm I/ike  a brother to C. II. J. Mitchell of the PlloUtiibnnc has purchased the Interest of C. B.- Ryder In the SJoux BaWdB' Republican-Proas. The Rec-^-irjbhefl, tbeneAv firm of Sherman ik-^ltchWt suceesa all along the If»«;  In licen-e .'oiinty  h". distribution of automobile fees for 1913, Pocahontas has received the sum of loj ?M,16G.OO, the last apportionment .11 $13,870 having been received by i'-easurer Pet^son, last week. That amount of mon(;y ought to gravel fluite a stretch of road.  A Labor Day Thought  Labor Day was originally establish ed to create, opportunity for consideration of the advance of tho great working masses of the people commonly r(>ferred to as "labor". The ludiday did not accomplish that result to any considerable extent, though it has proved popular coming at a pleasant time of tho year when people needed rest from their long summer of work.  Still the so-called "labor question" is discussed at some public gatherings of craftsmen and unions. This year, the widespread labor unrest should give the day a new signiil-cance. There should be a sincere ef fort to bring wise counsels into all public gatiierlngs.  The great majority of all elements of the people are honest and sincere. They are willing and want to be fair. Every element (ff courte inclines to see only its own difficulties and troubles. That is because so lit tie effort is commonly made to bring different elements of people together.  It would be a useful feature of a Labor Day observance, if a body of employers and employed could get together to discuss mutual relations and promotion of the community interest. Let each side tell Us troubles. The employers should ask the workers^ if they could do any better, were the'y to take the risk and responsibility of maniigtjment. The employes should ask the employers how they would feel if working under tho uncertainties of daily wages and limited income.  A better Get Together spirit would make the capitalist ashamedto grasp too great a share of the products of his industry, and the laborer ashamed to do anything less than his very best.  Big Day for Farmejis at Ames All roads in central Iowa wil lead to the agricultural experiment fields and plots at Ames, Wednesday, September 10, the day of the "Farm Crops and Soil Field Day." Already county agents rport that several hun derd farmers and their fainilics have made up their minds to come. They will come for tho most part by automobile and the highways early on the morning of the big day are likely to be loaded with traffic headed i^or Ames. .  The experiment fields at Ames are certain to be at their best September 10. The farm crops and soils experts are getting up a program that will make clear to armers just what the experiment station is doing and what results it is getting out of its work. Altogether, there ai'e several hundred plots and fields, which have under gone different soil treatments and which have carried different crops and been managed under different ro tations, A day's study of this work will in time bring dollars and cents to the farmer.  "This work is for tlie tanner and is paid tor largely by the . farmer," 5ays Prof. H. D. Hughes, who is mak ing arrangements for the big day, 'and the farmer ought to icnow just whdt is being accompllshedy psdan what his investment is accomplishing."  Which.Shall It Be?  Spealilng on the subject of n.ationa) ■zing the railroads, à' new matter hat has but recently thrust its atten ,ion upon the people of this country. vVallace's Farmers says:  Whatever action may be taken by .lie present congress, therefore, it eems clear that next year and very ilcoly for several years thereafter, we vill witness a political and economic itruggle between those who favor ;tate socialism and those who favor mr present industrial system. It is ime for thcjarmer to put on his hinking cap, and make up hi.s mind vlierÊ he is going to stand, for soon-■r or later he must make bis e.boi''e letween these two schools of thought nd will probably wield tlio lialantc f power. And while he is thinking h ing over, it will be well for him to ■eraemher that those wlio favor na-iimalization of industries will not top short of nationalization of land. When we got down to fundamentals, uitionallzation of land and a'l natur !il resources logically would come Irst of all. It is time for some clear thinking. ^  The Lincoln Ladies Aid social held at the Community Building on last Friday evening, drew quite a number irom Pocahontas. The baud drove di'ivp. and gave a concert which was joved those who were present, 'i iie l.idies realized a tidy.sum as the r-.-iiilt of their efforts.  'i'iie September term of the district «Hin t will convene on Monday, Sep-l(>iiiln;r 1, Judge N. J. Lee will bt on the bench. The printed calendar shows seven state cases, 150 old civil, 21 new civil, and 41 probate cases which ought to give all concerned plenty to do for the three weeks whiph are usually allowed for a term of court.  OFFICIAL COUNTY PAPER  See us toaay about your banking. We'll be only too glad to explain our methods.  The First National Bank  A Five Year Guarantee  FiiHy covers, agaiii.st cracking or burning-, every part—e.xcept the grate.s —of the Green COLONIAL Pipeless Furnace.  Of course, it is seldom necessary for any part to be replaced, for the  OriwEElIM  The lakes of northern Iowa are lit erally alive with wild ducks, young ones, many of them • are already large enough to fly from one lake to mother, says a dispatch in the Des Moines Register; For years teal have nested in the lakes and along the small streams in this latitude, but during the last two "summers Uiousands of mallards, pintails and ither varieties have nested here, ,t3o. Persons who have recently been at various parts of this territory say '.hat there are almost as many ducks 3n the lakes now as there usually has been in the heat of the shooting ieason when the 'birds are making their way south. The shooting season in Iowa is September IC to January 1st.  , »oy Jley^ra, w^io has been work-• ' Che aUbert »utit barber stwfc m<qxUt)s, iiM «one tô ÏCbL ì oliarge of a shop. Mid  be !■ KblQ to sot MiQth-  The average acre of Iowa land this year must pay a little more than 11 cents of tho entire cost of the state gpverament. This estimate is based Upon the average per acre valuation of Iowa farm land for the next bl-^nnlum. whlcii will be around i76, compared with $68.13 two years ago, and an average of assessor's report this y^at of a little more than $G9.  mm  t  Two prominent Chicago millionaires claim they have bought no sKoes for two-years. ''We are. wear Ing old ones because during the war It -wae patrjotlo t« do so, ' and since the ^mistlce we feel the itricee have been too high." Very good Idea. One shoe man toia us he could not 'jnt enough |15 sboe? to supply the and that ii rf^ itt>% tt^y^-tlijr «iM^-buxtikc'tlhem «UlM^  Possibly In going to Pocahontas during the past two years you have missed the Tony Sedlacek place northeast of that city on account of tho new county road system, and if 1-0, you have missed one of the show places of-tho county, says the Uolfo Arrow. Seldom do you find a bettor improved farm, unless owned by a millionaire and kept as a novelty rather than a real farm. All of tho buildings on this place arc of brick and are commodious and nicely arranged. They include residence barn, circular granai-y and corn bin, hog house,—mind you everything of brick. If you \j,ave not seen tho place it will pay 'you to drive by it while the roads are gpod.  Tho far famed flivver is being put to a new u.se, says the Shorbiirn Advance-Standard. Train officials are fitting them out with proper trucks for use on their tracks. Two of these boats went sailing thsough on the M. & St, Ij. this past week. To ./enable the driver te get off the trapk at any point for trains they carry Individual turn tables. It's a tunny sight to see these rigs go sailing oirer the rails. They speed up to. »8 mllea wlk hour.' ■  PIPBLESS FURNACE  jffsj- Green's Dome HeatIntensifler Is built to last for years. It is cast heavier to give extra strength to parts that ordinarily give out iirst. It is a pleasure to be able to offer you this ■quality furnace with its many efficient and econ o m i c a 1 advantages. T b e Green ^ COLONIAL Pipele.ss Furnace merits your careful consideration.  Come in and let us explain its many features—Green's Dome Heat Intensi fi e r — air-blast fire pot— separate grate bars and others. It will help you choose the RIGHT furnace.  "We could handle any fur-r\ace but wechosetheGroon COJLONI-fl^"  OWÂRD « BOOKMiN  $pot Cash and Prompt Service at Our House  Bring us Your  Eggs ant Poultry  Highest Possible Prices  J. A.  PHONE 25  CROWTHER  POCAHONTAS, IOWA  »¿iâîïji.  sr- - -  ¿¡àlk.   

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