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Pocahontas Record Newspaper Archive: August 14, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Pocahontas Record

Location: Pocahontas, Iowa

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   Pocahontas Record (Newspaper) - August 14, 1919, Pocahontas, Iowa                                 Mdia.  tvOL. 36 NO. 18^  »ns of air to one tnd makes a larjre irectly in contact with Perfect combustion. /e. Cooks at mucli less/ any other stove or any ^bther fuel.  ie this stove and let us ^emon-Pou. Easily operated and controlled.  We want you to see this stove before you buy. We Sharpen Lawn Mowers  Come strate i  HARDWARE  P L. RIV  Buy your is safer to think you  supply of coal ticiw. It lat you have it than to ^get it. It may be scarce this winter.  Tankage and Mill Feed on Hand  'Die NEW EDISON  The Three MilUon Dc^ar Phonograph  Thomas A. Edison invented the phonogr»' Later he improved Iiíb original where hig busine» adviser« said the best phoifograph in existeni market-4t.i' V  Mr. |;diil^^ook his heád ing to putdá a new phom that its reprodwctiwi of mi the original music."  Thomas A. Edison spent cash to develop an initrumen; voi8e,andaU,kittd%c^ that the «ri|pnal,eoa^ n^  "I am not go-is so perfect detected from  ioUmiacold itohed the hnnum «9 perfwtìy tjje'repwdttptiçn M^ed.  toiett  youMw Í« m, to tbi«i  -ynak you to jiÌiLin«ddtftà new is  'I- ________  ir «:i  H SI  tcf-  POCAHONTAS, IOWA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1919  Farm Co-operation  Farmers aliould bo able to mako as much money as other buHlnesa men. The majority of them will not In the long run do so, until their work la organized on a greater scale. The successful men of today have attained their wealth by handling production on a large scale. The small individual producer in any industry rarely accompllBhes much.  It IB very likely Impossible to com bine farms on big scales, as factories are combined oii account of the physi cal difticultles, To get the best result of combination, a large group of Workers need to be assembled in some one place like a factory, where they can be efficiently supervised and work according to uniform stand ards. Naturally farming cannot be done in that way.  But co-operation and combination can be applied to the farming industry a great deal more than has ever been done. Farmers are realizing this ail over the country. The new associations are buying costly machinery and arranging for the joint use of it. Thoy market their products on a big seal. They buy fertilizers arid other supplies at a discount. They unite to introduce thoroughbred cattle. And so on in a great variety of ways.  A co-operative movement need not attempt anything very big at the out set. It can work at ilrat along two or three lines where the advantages ot united action are most obvious. The co-operators will make some mistakes, but they will acquire valuable experience. After they have learned to work together, in a few things, they can go on to take up other lines.  The farmers in Pocahontas county should take up and push this movement with all their energy. It is bound to revolutionize American agri culture, and to bring results that could never be hdft under the old fashioned individual farming.  Petit Jurors for September Ìerm  John Hartnett................Gilmore City  John Youngdale................Pocahontas  J. E. MaaBsen.i............................Rolfe  F. S. Slmmonson..........................Rolfe  Geo. Dyvig............................Havelock  G. W. Howard........................Havelock  Torval Johnson............:.....Pocahontas  J. R. Hawk............................Havelock  J. W.' Scott........................Pocahontas  Theo. Keitzman...j....................Plover  B. W. Jeffries..............................Rolfe  C. M. Heflln................................Fonda  W. A. Tolbert..........................Laurens  A. C. Schroeder........................Palmer  Àugi Meyer................................Fonda  P, E. Brown....................1.......Laurens  A. E. Sargent............................Fonda  Pat i'ord......................;.'..........Varlna  Wm. Cummlngs..........................Fonda  ,Charley O'Malley..................Havelock  C. M. Patterson..............;.............Rolfe  Henry H. DeWall..............Pocahontas  A. Ausberger..........................Fonda  C. B, Cederstrom.................-.....Fonda  C. H. Colè..................................Varina  Hoy E.. Hopklnp-----.,„.^.....;„Jjaurens  Frèd Kidder..................;........:..Varina  B. B. Mason....................Ollmore City  F. A. Pringle..........................Mallard  Chester King..........................Laurens  Guy Smith..........................-.........Rolfe  B. J. Synstellen........................Fonda  Henry Metzger........................Palmer  P. J, Shaw..................................Plover  L. J. Brown....................Gilmore City  J. P. Peterson..................Gilmore City  After all there are Just two things that go toward making up a good live town—one la pesristent, thorough and attractive advertising and the «other is backing up the advertising < with perfomahce, truthfully says an exchange. There is no use of advertising If you haven't the gDoiJ|, and there is no use having the goods if 'you don't advertise them. No town was ever benefitted by the man who sits down and waits for the more enterprising and public spirited persons to bring the trade to him, and neither is the man who falls to deliver the goods when called upon. The first, l8 a leach, and the second an oyster, and both help to make cow pasture but of a town.  Supervisor Sedlacek went to Rockwell City, last Saturdày, and drove home a new army truck which will be used for county road work. This Is one oi the machines which Is being disti-ibuted by the government and It will be put to good use. It is a Nash-Quad, all steel, two and one-half ton capacity and drives from all tour wheels which makes it a powerful machine. Mr. Sedlacek says the county made a request for two of the machines and It Is possible another one will be received before long. The same company makes this machine which manufactures the Nash-Slx automobile.  There Is more trouble in the Modern Woodmen camp. The head oflic-era have been called into court on an Injuncitloh suit against the new as-aesament rates. Three suits have been "started as follows: Injunction against new rates; conversion of society's funds; an action for accounting. Thè suits were started at Minneapolis and Woodmen r clerks have been offloUHy notified. One contention Is that the new rates were not lè^lly adopted. Crooked work in se curinjs the vote is charged.  A fashion expert who has just returned from a trip of Ave tbeusand miles through Europe* thinks that ^ericmn ready made clothing will soon b« worn all over the world. Our clothes are smarter In cut and better in it tbwi any others ewept the cu|h torn cloOspi made by the best tallora ha» an4 In Kucope. Moreover, the - " <iluite made them iamlllar to-iMiMifl^ nAVQr saw them beforó ' id haT« flimted a <|emand for them;  JUltm the Laurens  fii^wi« tp ®#alio»t«8. Monday, to  nmt wlth^ ^^Btr «ducational  ...... .....  ' J  Wheat for chicken feed at Rivard's Elevator.  Miss Veronica Lampe visited at Dubuque and Dycrsville, last week.  Helper wanted at Rock Island station. Inquire of I. H. Brokaw, Agent  Miss Stella Jerabek went to Som-ers, last Thursday, for a few days visit with friends.  J. B. Pattee^; and family left last Friday by auto route for a visit with relatives at Independence.  Vincent Muuray left Monday for Dubuque, and will also visit at Des Moines, while he is enjoying his vacation.  W. T. AVhite's public gale oi household good« drew a good crowd Saturday evening, and the prices received were very satisfactory.  Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Hronek were at Schuyler, Nebraska, last week, visiting at the home of their son, Walter, a prominent atorney at that place.  You get a business education but once. Got the beat. The Nettletonu Commercial College, Sioux Falls, S. D., is not excelled. Get their catalog.  Frank Stegge received his discharge from army service at Camp Dodge, last Friday, and has returned home. Most ot the boys from this section are now at home.  Bernard Coyne, said to be the larg est man in the world, who was an attraction at the Fonda fair was in Pocahontas briefly last Saturday en-route to his next stopping place.  The rains we have had in this section the past two weeks came just at the right time for the corn and there is every indication now that we will have a bumper crop this fall.  Clint Greenwood recently purchased a new Oakland motor bus which ho will use in carrying the mail and passengers between here and Have-lock.  R. W. Beers has -sold his residence property in Fairview addition to Mr. Elsesser from near Albert City, the consideration being $8,500. Mr. Beers does not give possession until next March.  Mrs, Oma E. Thomas, wife of former Judge Lot Thomas òt Storm Lake, passed away at the home of her daughter on August 2, at Augusta, Georgia,. Mrs. Thomas was past seventy-four years of age.  Louie Stoulil arrived home last Saturday after getting his discharge at Camp Dodge. He arrived from overseas on July 29. Louie Is looking well and he says he is mighty glad to get back to pia Pocahontas.,  Miss Zelle Pattee is enjoying a thirty days furlough at home from Camp Meade, where she is now located. Miss Pattee enlisted in the nurses training service at the army hospital and says she likes her work.  The Business Outlook  Writers on business topics could formerly predict the commercial future with some confldence. Signs of dtorms were as clearly marked as by a barometer. But in these unprecedented times, past experience throws little light on the future.  On the surface the business situation is of the most favorable kind. Bank clearings have been rising to the highest figures ever recorded. Most of the'railroad net earnings for June have been published, and show marked improvement. Commercial failures are at a very low point.  Yet there are many cautional signals in the financial weather. The price situation is bad. The constant increase ot living costs must tend to check business. Labor troubles will check production and frighten capital from undertaking new enterprises Europe shows a disposition to discourage imports from the United States in all lines but those very essential to reconstruction.  With such indications as these, the business community should steer clear ot speculation. The enormous amount of money being put into oil stock is not a favorabel symptom. A great many men may find themselves tied up before long with unsalable or worthies securities while their credit ors are demanding cash. Land specu lation is proceeding recklessly in many sections and will tie up capital needed to float buslne.ss.  Yet no reason exists today why any Igitlmate enterprise should curtail operations. More money is in the hands of the working masses than ever before. They are going to be able to keep buying for a good while under any conditions. As long as they keep buying, all the producing inductries can market their goods freely. There are times when it is safe to produce in large volume, but not to speculate.  Pomeroy Boy to West Point  Marion Hittenmark, son of Mr. and Mrs, O, F. Hittenmark, of Pomeroy, received a telegram from Washington Friday morning informiug him of his appointment to fill a vacancy at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He left for that place Sunday evening, as his instructions were to report for physical examination and enrollment on Wednesday, August 6.  The honor ot Marion's appointment is shared by him with the com-munnity, as vacancies at the school are not of . common occurrence, and the highest qualifications are necessary in the candidate for enrollment.  "The appointment was secured through the efforts of Congressman Dickinson of Algona.—Herald.  Some New State Laws  Among the laws passed by the 38th General Assembly which became effective July 4 were the Housing Law, Temple of Justice, Workmen's Compensation Law, the appropriation ot $100,000 for a state park, and an appropriation of $175,000 for Psycho-patric Hospital, Teachers' Minimum Salary law, the Red Flag law, the Criminal Syndicalism law, the law giving superintendents the right to enforce the right ot English alone in the schools, a n appropriation for a home for delinquent children, the law creating a force for licensing plumb-esr and another for civil engineers, a bill giving pardon to men who entered military service, two bills allowing the county supervisors and school boards to contract for free den tal service for inmates of the poor farm and pupils ot schools.  Ora Alberts of Lincoln township, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Alberts, aged about twenty years, has been quite ill for several days, and when Dr. Beam got hold of the case. Dr. McAullff was called up from Webster City and an operation performed last Friday. A very serious condition was found, an abcess of the bowels and a perforated ulcer, but the young man rallied from the operatloi and has shown some improvement during the past few days and seems to have a fighting chance for his life. He was in such shappe that he could not be taken to a hospital but a professional nurse was secured and everything possible is being done for him at home. It Is in such cases as this that the need of a nearby hospital is felt. We hope young Alberts will win the flght tor his lite.—Rolte Arrow.  Only a few more weeks and our schools will convene again, and what will the boys and girls, who "graduat ed' before finishing the 8th grade do? Will they return to school and strive to obtain a common school education? This is the wisest and best thing they can do, and parents should Insist on their doing so.  LOUS 168th  Pantry  fimental Band  40 Musicians 40 lO Soloist^s 10  County Attorney Lynch was called to Des Moines, last Thursday, by Governor Harding, to meet with the county atorneys of the state for a discussion of the high costoMiving. It they do not have better luck than congress and President Wilson, it will be some time before the people will see much reduction in prices.  OFFICIAL COUNTY PAPER  The First National Banlc  A Five Year  Fully covers, against cracking or burning, every part—except the grates —of the Green GOIvONIAL, Pipeless Furnace.  Of course, it is Seldom necessary for any part to be fèplaced, for the  OF^ifeE-lSr  COLmMIu  Has Greens ^omQ Heat In^isiiior Is buijlt to last for years. It i.5i€ast heavier > to give extra st^'ngth to pajé^that ordinarily give out finsii ' It is a pleasure*, to be able to offer ^pii this^.^^ quality furnai;^ witlf ' its many efii^nt ansi econ o m i dclv.^n-Viges. T G^en COLONIAli Pi^tess Furnace uieiit^your careful con.sidera-tion. fr<  Come in and let us explain its many features—Green's Dome Heat Intensi fi e r — air-blast fire pot— separate grate bars and others. It will help you choose the RIGHT furnace.  "Wo could handle any furnace but we chos* the Green COI-ONIAL"  OfARD  Blue Devil's  Mr. and Mrs.Cal Saylor visited rela tives In Cherokee, a couple of days, last week. Misa Blrdeva Bush, a niece returned home with them. Tues day they left for a" week's outing at Spirit Lake, and went by he way of Cherokee, tv get Mrs, Saylor's sister who accompanied them to the lakes.  George WIegman Is .taking hla annual vaeation, this week, from hla duties as rural mall carrier, and with his family and Mrs. Ctiaa. Trenary left early in the week for Alexandria Minn., for a rialt at the home of Mrs. Paul Johnson, Mrs; Wiegnitans sister.  Kansas has a new drink called Clj<>ctaw jBeer," innocent enough in apjtearanee bat possessiUc a mightr Jiick. All teste have failed to pro-duee «ay IraGeB of alcohol in th« beverag:«. The new drink is steadily Kalnlag in popularity^  W. Morgan, wlto haa oi^lr»ted a droit atM* »t XAar«Ba for Mrenil  i'SSiW.Tii'ASi.i  Spot Cash and Prompt Service at Our House   

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