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Oelwein Daily Register Newspaper Archive: February 10, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Oelwein Daily Register

Location: Oelwein, Iowa

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   Oelwein Daily Register (Newspaper) - February 10, 1943, Oelwein, Iowa                                SECTION 1 1 to 8 37. Fail Leated Wire Report of TODAY'S Important Kvtntt of the World bu Automatic Printer Service. THE OELWEIN DAILY REGISTER, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1943. tEDS REPORTED SHELLING KARKOV Cold and ik'Mftt mat tious flurries and strMff thu aftof noon. 20 CENTS THE WEEK. RUSSIANS OPEN ARTILLERY BARRAGE ON ROSTOV Farm Machinery Quota Increased 3MB JAP BASES ks Take Equipment In Gua- lalcanal; Enemy Losses Re- ported Staggering rASHINGTON UP U. S. nen rained new blows on Jap- ses bases in the Solomon is- 1s Tuesday while ground forces ed their first major land vie- T of the Pacific war by captur- a large amount of equipment ndoned by the once-powerful my forces on Guadalcanal, he navy disclosed in a com- tiique today that ground forres ow largely army troops who e taken over from marine units ich originally invaded the is- without opposition ough territory which formerly s strongly Japanese, and cap- ed "a large amount of enemy lipment. i.n American column which had jck through jungles and moun-t i TOUS terrain to outflank tnej :my- the navy reported, had ched a point within one mile of i p Esperance, one-time Japanese mghold and major landing nt for enemy reinforcements supplies. Che new air raids struck at two bases in the central Sol- of New Georgia md, 180 miles northwest of ladalcanal, and Kolombangara and, 190 miles northwest of in the Russell ands, only 60 miles northwest ol ladalcanal. According to Secretary of the lVy Frank Knox, "all resistance Guadalcanal apparently has ased" except that of scattered DES MOINES UP County quotas of new farm machinery for., spring operations have been in- i creased by 25 per cent, A. J. Love- land, Iowa State USDA war board chairman said today. The quotas were formerly lim- ited to 75 per cent of 1943 pro- auction but have been increased the remaining 25 per cent of 1943 manufacture. County quotas also will be in- creased by the amount of inven- JOB FREEZE, RETURN-TO-FARM EXPECTED SOON 48-Hour Work Ordered; Byrnes' Hints At Com- pulsion T" Solve Manpower Problem WASHINGTON UP The Oct. 31, 1942, less appeals or pre- quota sales, Loveland declared. "Purchase certificates are being NAZI RETREAT TO DNIEPER NOW ALMOST CERTAIN Russian Spokesman Smashing- Drives In Sprfvic LONDON UP Russian C. I. O Aid To Bridges SAN FRANCISCO U? The Congress of Industrial Organiza- tions was pledged today to carry to the supreme court if necessary' the attempt of Harry Bridges to I avoi ddeportation. j The CIOs pledge was made by Piesident Philip Murray in a statement released here by the Bridges defense committee. Bridges, west coast CIO leader, said he and his suporters would long range guns have opened bom- not let their case interfere with i bardment of the great system.-of their efforts to win the war. German defenses ringing Kharkov Bridges, who faces deportation and Stormovik dive bombers are tc Australia, said he was "keenly making a furious attack on strong disappointed" in the refusal of points, highways and railroad! planting Loveland said less And he said land; is to save tires and gas. on the farms should stay i "A farmer who receives a pur- there, chase certificate can be sure that nvrnes the impleemnt he is entitled to buy eithr in or near his county, or clepartmen, will be shipped there as soon as it is he said. imum 48-ho'ir work week for "all c-mployment" in 32 critical areas 111 i I.A.UK7U.L T> ww. and proposes further Jo Jhe f ederal Judge Martin I. Welsh to west of the city to impede the 15-sue a writ of habeas corpus at movement of enemy reinforcft- Sacramento on Monday. ments, dispatches from Stockholm said today. The Russians were only 43 miles north of Kharkov after tak- ing Belgorod, and on the northeast they had taken Shebekino, only 41 miles away. Other columns were moving in the Kharkov di- rection from the east and soutti- east. Military quarters nere were now almost ce-tain that the Germans might be forced back to ttie Dnieper river line. A Russian. military spokesman, asserted to the United Press here that the Red army would continue its offensive ping new machinery to the deal- _ fled ei5; ,Q tc- the factories should be given Each far mmachme made this l h said economic stabni. year, according to Loveland, will v address last night that the war the on I the farms" bv issue of peak season CLAIMTH ARMY NOW IN TUNISIA Neutral Rtwrts Indicate Mont- gomery Preparing To Out- flank Mareth Line CAIRO UP The axis' Mareth line in Tunisia can be Across the Don river from Rostov, whose main street is shown in the photo above, the Red army's famous artillery has begun heavy bombardment preparatory to Direct attack on the city. Although German soldiers were reported several days ago to be streaming westward out of the important town defense of Rostov was said to have flared desperately today, as the Nazi officers realized they were almost trapped. Moscow reported its laige units were unable to cross the Don, whose ice covering is thick only in spots. Special Scout Meeting Tonight furloughs. But he said no plan turned and the battle to drive the th and was I enemy off the last African bridge- mined to take Russia's rents' tn phasized in competent quarters here that future operations in the south and southwest Pacific would be most important and would re- nds" of Japanese trapped by an quire every available ship, man nerican pincers in a V-shaped cket in the the island. northwest corner CLOSES DOOR TO WAGE INCREASES New Program For Dairy Industry had been agreed upon. The 48-hour work week, or- head is imminent with "all the dered into effect in 32 areas, was dice loaded in our Gen. established by Mr. Roosevelt as Sir Harold R. L. G. Alexander, a national policy It was left to British commander in the middle f 11 tmnns Chairman Paul V. McNutt of the east, said today. oi an tioo_D_, Manpower commission to decide The Mareth line, about 40 irienas are m- how widely it snouid prevail. He miles long, was constructed at the special meeting _ named the 32 critical areas. I time as the Maeinot line in The work-week order protected France, Alexander said, at a time connec- ?n time and one_half overtime pay when people were not thinking Uons IVP1 rights of labor under contract or in terms of mobile, armored ffieh schoo aud- th Tere will be a Tenderfoot In- cSemonv for who Irf Cubs emd- and tor cuos graa under the wage-hours act. _ forces. Deputy War Manpower Chair-! "The Mareth me can be turn- The Japanese had held the is- id only about a year. In Janu- y 1942, they drove the natives d' few British officials from the incinal villages of the Guadal- nal-Tulagi area and began build- g an airfield that was to be- me known as Henderson Field. Virtual elimination of the enemy Dm Guadalcanal barely dents the iter ramparts of Japan's south- -st Pacific defense perimeter, nox said the conquest has ought the United States within distance of some of the ore important Japanese bases. But the road to Tokyo is long. There are still several well- tablished, enemy bases in the )lomons, northwest of Guadal- nal, from which the enemy must and Kolomban- ira in the New Georgia island oup; Rekata on Santa Isabel is- nd; Shortland island; Buin and ieta on Bougainville island and jka island. In their exaltation over the uadalcanal victory, observers arned. Americans should femem- >r that the six months consumed gaining complete domination of re island also served the Jap- iese in good stead. It gave them at much more time to develop ie resources of the rich areas iey Tiad conquered in the early onths of the Dutch opt Indies, Malaya, and the hilippines. Another unknown but import- it factor in the present situation i the southwest Pacific is how ie opnosing forces will fare in ie scries of air-sea engagements hich have been in progress in ie Solomons area for nearly 'two eeks. These actions may dictate iture strategy, but the navy has no information on their rogress. UNITED TATES PACIFIC'FLF.ET. UP Japan lost len killed. 200 ships sunk or dnm- Eed and nlanes destroyed in s first freat defeats .of the war n Guadalcanal Island and in New ruinea, well-informed quarters stimated today at this nerve cen- >r of the Pacific theater. In the southern Solomons alone, was estimated, Japan lost about men killed, 150 ships sunk r damaged and more than 1.000 'anes destroyed. The rest of the jsses were suffered in the New h'inea campaign. The United States naval, marine, ir and army forces suffered pain- ul losses. But they were rela- ively light and throughout the ampaign the American forces outnumbered. The United States forces at sea nd on land won their victory with minimum of ships and men and quipment. Recent reports in- icated that the naval forces were 'ow beinc strengthened rapidly. i. United Press dispatc-h reported hat new new ships, new ilanes and more and more sup- ilies were going in and that more rore on the way. But it was em- plane and gun which could be as- sembled. The Solomons campaign actually v began last May when a force of Byrnes Finn Against Rise In Pay Farm Prices; Promises In- vasion Of Europe United States carrier planes sank 11 Japanese warships, transports and cargo vessels at Tulagi har- bor, just north of Guadalcanal. WASHINGTON UP This was the first phase of the nomic Stabilization Director James battle of the Coral Sea in which F. Byrnes' injunction against gen- Japan suffered a big defeat. eral wage rate increases above the c'.efinite plan of promotion that is Between May and August the "little steel" formula ceiling today m tune with the Barker DES MOINES UP Dairy food shortages and resulting ra- SI'S" proach to the buying public, Frank F. Barker, secretary of the Iowa Dairy Industry Commission said today. "Meeting today's situation and the post-war period calls for a he said- flatly. The time is approachi UP to the higher figure' would be an additional 1. boys entitling the Civil- will be made by Mr. Alden Porter to all Scouts who have enrolled in the Civilian defense project. surplus in any given area, the _ war industries now- were The'time'is approaching, Alex- ?verage 45.7-hour work week and ander said, when all the warfare that if all persons working over will be merged into the uated 30 and under 48 hours were moved Tunisian battle.' city, which is the great Dnieper anchor and the key to the Ger- man defense system in all south- ern Russia. Dispatches indicated that for the present the Russians were likely to push their lines westward- of the Kharkov-Kursk-Orel-Mos- cow railroad, they made a defi- nite attack on Kharkov, time moving on it slowly the eastern side behind heavy ar- I LONDON, UP Neutral dis- of Belgorod, sit-. ____ a hill and offering ex- cellent defense powibilities, amaz- ed military quarters who said, the and strengt hof the Russian fort. If the order produces a army had cross thi labor s.ian frontier in force on two sec- tors and it was announced official- The already withdrawal program." "Inside Information" col- Japanese moved into the Solomons unhampered. Their construction of an air field on Guadalcanal, within range of United Nations bases and supply lines farther south, made action imperative. So the marines, suppoited by the fleet, moved in and landed on Guadalcanal, Tulagi, Gavutu and Florida islands. The Japanese cleaned out the small landing forces in the last four is- lands, it may be said now, in the first few days of bitter fighting. But on Guadalcanal, where the first landing was unopposed, seven months of fighting under I, froze" the regular wages of hun- declared. tireds of thousands of workers. But the new 48-hour work week urge that all sponsoring institu- tions be represented. Such a program would: 1. Provide dairy farmers with order will bring bigger weekly voice in telling their side of paychecks to many thousands who production, shortages and ration- have been working fewer hours. ing of dairy foods. For workers who will go from 2. Provide means of keeping a 40 to 48 hour week and are en- the public informed of the value, titled to time and one-half pay flavor and goodnes sof dairy foods, for hours over 40, it will mean Guard against shift sto substitutes permanent. temporary becoming sbout a 30 per cent boost in week- ly income. Byrnes' move to stop the recent 4. Provide protection for the of labor demands for higher nation's butter, cheese and milk wage rates to compensate for high- markets, er living costs was accompanied 5. World War a Year Ago Today! mun }y that American Flying Fortresses umn of DSJI> Sketch ag_ tnus released on farms in nearby had bombed the airdrome again at serted that Adolf Hitler, frightened areas. The commission under Kairouan. by the Russian advance, was mov.- farms, Harper said. sed into Tunisia from Tripolitania bers of his personal staff were al- Revelation of this far reaching on the central and southern sec- ready at the new quarters. By United Press piogram to deal with manpower tors and that a major battle was It gaid also tnat the German problems was accompanied by expected east of the French-built proraganda ministry had canceled some evidence that enforcement Mareth line, plans are not complete and that American planes, visits of all foreign correspond- Bntish 'report enemy landings' Airacobral on Singapore in area between how far th desire to or can warhawks, planes of the n om mcmams a party oi lu Sungei Mandai and Kranji. _.-..._... by a promise to prevent price m- 1o meet any situation that might icassar go without legislation in establish- French Lafayette Escadnlle, and Dutch Indies communique an- ing a 48-hour-week for "all em- Royal Air Force Spitfires were ac- nounces -Japanese landings__in nationally or regionally, five over a wide section of the If any confusion does exist re- front Provide an alert program Southwestern Celebes near Ma- i garding the precise scope of the yesterday, however. Spanish reports said the bulk of Japanese due to go there after a tour of industrial areas. The Russian spokesman who predicted a continued Russian drive foresaw a series of smash- ing offensives continuing into the terrain brought American victory, I flowed by law. He also said in and their products. loss of transport Royal T. Frank, ministration, it probably is attrib- Tunisia in the wake of advance nnd the Stars and stripes now fly from Henderson, the air field which the Japanese had just about completed when the marines land- ed. -V- Arrest Minors On Liquor Charge UP Prosecution of Max Veach. 19, Dos and tn unidentified 17-year-old Des Moines boy who were arrested Monday night for illegally trans- porting whisky from Omaha, Nob., was withheld today pending at- tempts of the youths to get into the armed forces. Judge Norman R. Hayes. Adcl, to'd them today that they will be released from Dallas county cus- tody if they are able to get into a branch of service. Otherwise, he they wit be arraigned and prosecuted. The two minors were arrested by highway natrolrnen near here v.'ith the whisky Voach said was "an investment'' for them He said he is to enter the armed ser- vices and wanted the profit ne would make by selling the Ne- b'-aska Honor "to throw a party" before he joined, Lions Club Plans Valentine Dance A special Valentine dance for members of the Oelwein Lions club and their guests will be held Fridpy evenin? at the Amercan Legion Hub rooms on West Char- les. Dell Hanson's orchestra will provide the music for the danc- ing program, and late refresh- ments will be served hy the La- dies of Auxiliary. Ray Hamilton is chairman of the com- I his radio address last night that 6. Provide research into nutri- torpedoed and sunk by enemy utable to the fact that the pro- patrols that entered the French the Office of Price Administra- tional merits of dairy foods. tion was reviewing the entire 7. Provide an opportunity to Jan. 28. submarine in Hawaiian area on gram was revealed in parts and protectorate two days ago. sections and more or less mde- The Eighth army was making price structure with a view to "re- build a wide rand more ducing puces wherever exorbitant home market. lasting Pacific War Council meets for pendently by three different in- slower progress on the coastal sec- first time at 10 Downing St., dividuals and explained separate- tor, the dispatches said, because prices exist." is danger that we may not fully appreciate the terrible fatrcsses and strains upon our ac- t habits of living that we must be prepared to undergo dur- ing the coming Byrnes told the nation. Although we shall not have to endure the shame ot poxerty arnid plenty that we did in 1932, we shall in fact have little moic goods to use or con- sume at home than we did' at the depth of the depression. "We must all prepare to adopt r. spartan standard of living and to take patriotic pride in it." He did not confine himself to usages; he denounced the farm bloc by proclaiming his faith in "incentive payments" to farmers described by farm bloc membeis as ''subsidies" and whol- ly undesirable. He opposed any change in the farm parity formula, adding: "Cer- tainly, it would not be in the real interest of the farmer to introduce any change in this formula which would give him a temporary and illusory advantage during the war, ;.nd which would, if applied year in and year out, actually reduce parity prices to farmers.'' His anti-inflation plan spelled rejection of demands by John L. Lewis' United Mine Workers for a 32-a-day rafse for bituminous coal miners; of demands by thf rail- load brotherhoods for 30 per cent i aises for rail workers, and of all other wage rates requests beyond the little steel formula's 15 per cent ceiling. The Byrnes po'icy statement fell neatly into the pattern pre- pared this week for the adminis- tration's new drive to offset labor 8. Provide means to take up (he slack when lend-lease and the aimed forces' ended. London. Russians report 80 ly by two of them. I it was heavily mined and defended ack as the ground thawed and impeded operations first in the south, then farther north. He said this year the history of the last two summer campaigns, when the Germans were able to mass men and machines for long- Nov. 29 and Feb. 7. _______________ cities and Immediate congressional reac- by rear guards and some artillery mar'cheS] would not be repeated. requirements are villages recaptured between tion to the 48-hour-work week. Severe fighting was expected Mariupol is 100 miles west of between the Eighth army and the Eostov Kramatorsk js 15e miles Afnka Korps on the eastern side (o the of the Mareth line. 55 to 70 miles to mao of area ;nside Tunisia, the Dispatches as- the spokesman (Continued on Page Two) JUDGES RACK BRAINS OVER WEIGHTY PROBLEM serfed. There had been no allied con- firmation that the Eighth army had crossed the border in i although E'ghth army ?dvancf d units had met American forces in southern Tunisia. Today's middle eastern r-ommand "Spring comes here first, and! by mid-March the will be p: ar-tically a quagmire. "The soil here is clay, which is converted into mud of such con- sistencv that PTnored warfare is impossible. It is reasonable to as- sume that forward movement will the EieHh army. Both axis bomb- I ers sent on the raid wpre shot j down by allied fiahter planes, ap- i patently some distance from their objective. Allied bnmhers from middle blasted Palermo, Sicily, again Monday niPht and started fires. Radio Paris broadcast a German v.-hich the selective service system There was no official confirma- j his headquarters to a point 30 will encourage for- tion of Algerian reports reaching inside Poland) the' mer farm workers to leave their Madrid that Gen. Sir Bernard L. defenses f the new German east- factory jobs and return to the Montgomery's Imperials had cros- Sie5fried line and that mem- communique merely said, however, he much slowed -m the Rostov_ that patrol activitv continued Donets basin area, after the closing alone the border yesterday, and f.f our traD However, we have that bad weather hindered air op- been for such conditions erations over the battle Jrea. will be ready witb ]ight forces The midole eastern command I and Royal Air Force's commum- vance and if they will aue revealed that axis planes had break any ma1or counterattacks." i tried to raid Tripoli Monday mght "Leningrad is another sector for the first tinv smce it fell to -vVhich ,s stirring right now. "Do you ever wonder why names of so many Russian generals sud- disappear from the news? Wei', this soring may answer that ouestion, when they appear as if from nowhere with fresh troops, as the army frnm the Kalmyk steepes apoeared on the north Caucasus front a few weeks ago that Lieut. Gen. Bernard to the consternation of the Ger- L. Montgomery, commander of the man staff." I Eighth army, was concentrating a 1 sreat number of tanks ;n ern Tunisia, whirh might indicate that he WPS going to try to out- flank the Mareth Ime. American forces. Radio Paris said, were rrvnrentrated in the Gafsa area of Tunisia, whence thev might" drivp northeast to the of Sfax. to the Iowa State Man To Speak At Oran Professor Royal H. Holbrook of Iowa State college has been se- as soeaktf ;it High school this spring, to an announcement by demands for higher farm bloc demands wages and for higher mittee in charge of arrangements prices. On Monday, Price Admin- J Bob istrator Prentiss M. Brown let it' j (Continued" on Page Two) is beine assisted by Beach and Dr. C. 0. Olson. Three prominent Oelwein men are shown as they were about to make their decision as to whst name should be selected for the Register's new column. The name selected from scores of ent'ies was submitted by Mrs. L. N. Fortier of 521 7th St. S. W. The name is GINGER SNAPS, and Mrs. Fortier writes that she sent this in because "it has added a dash of spice to your paper and prom- ises to be 'snappy' reading." The judges, left to right, are Merrill of the First National Bank; M. F. Gundenon, mayor; Father E. J. O'Hagan, pastor of Sacred Heart Church. Gahes. or 'directly east the of the shortest route to the class. The i Gulf- of Gabes, The purpose in hf d I rither case would bp .to off Mr- Holbrook Oran j Afrira Korpk from Col. Gen. Jur- W on 1 sen Von Arnim's forces in north- he ern Tunisia. talk to a jM JEWS PA PER I   

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