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Worth County Index Newspaper Archive: June 18, 1903 - Page 2

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Publication: Worth County Index

Location: Northwood, Iowa

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   Worth County Index (Newspaper) - June 18, 1903, Northwood, Iowa                                Worth County Index. SCAMMON OIURUP, MORTHWOOD. We are assimilating [mmlgrantt in- stead of digesting securities. Unrle Sam tins more forests to barn than he will have a few de- caues The Harvard professor who has dis- covered the germ of smallpox has our permission to keep it. nation RH simultaneous polygamy with- in Utah's boundaries. Until we have divorce law In every forbid- ling remarriage nf divorced jtersons luring tlie life of a divorced partner will continue to flourish hrougbout tlje country. Statistics have frequently shown tlttit more tlmn hree-fourths of the divorces In the Jolted Stntes arc Rwnred for Immedl- remarriage to n not lit1 r person al- ready selected. Mothers may well look with dread upon the future of their children whlb' morality so lax pre- ,11s outside Utah and Is finding Its victims In annually Increasing thou- sands in every plane of society. Mrs. TYIggi, of cabbage pstch fame, Is a heroine of fiction who does not appeal to the gentlemen who Invent Dew names for cigars. Many A man puzzlea over the proper place for "Khali" and "will." After a he learns that when a woman he shall, lie will. Now Moncure D. Conwny sava he WAS misquoted. He dldu't cull Lincoln EI so.imp. Tills must be a great relief to Lincoln's descendants. Whltnhcr Wright's claim that he would have been worth if lie had opr-rated In this country Is n tribute of which American has not reason lo be proud. That boy who tried to eat fire after the fashion of the lire-cater at a the- atrical performance will never lio ns handsome as lie was, but he will have a govd deal more sense- t the United States should he a lender in the great movement for In- ternational arbitration is fitting. The movement Is the most vital one In world politics, and its success up to the preeent la due very Inrycly to Influ- ences from this country. The progress of arbitration during the last year has been, remarkable beyond 1b'e expecta- tion of Us moat sanguine advocates. A year ago, the international court at The Hague was an untried tribunal. In twelve months It received three great Pius fund case be- tween this country and Mexico, settled last fall In onr favor; the Japanese house tax case between Japan on one side and Great Britain. France and Germany on the other: and the Yen- ;uelan question of preferential trent- ent, Ihe settlement of which will es- bllsh fin Intenmtloiial principle of e utmort Importance. Besides these, vc other International disputes have Mrs. BurdlL-lt baa her but even tlint will hardly make her forget tlini some of (lie pnpors wore mean fimugb to Fay at tlie time of the in- that she was homely and looked her years. It is simply wonderful, all the rhinos Hint can be done with cotton-seed oil. In December we shipped 2.000 tons of cotton-seed oil to Marseilles. and tt will soon come hack to us pure olive cill. Peking, written Pekln In United States Cnvcnmient publications since 18SI7, is to hack Its "g." If current developments may be taken as Indica- tion, the ancient capital of China jnay yet be written Pekinyskv. No. troubled reader, those alleged mlornmcnts ivhlHi women wear In their hats resembling miniature fcnth rr dusters art! not hadges of an order of housemaids. They are just a of freak Transcript. When yon take- Into account ail the varied, forms of healing and the num Ifer of people engaged In minlstertug to minds and bodies diseased isn't I a wonder that anybody can get sick enough to die? Or is tt more to be wondered at that anybody la alive? Mr. Mansnairlnn says the woman o the future will be "more creative ant Inquisitive nnd h-ss passive and sub missive1' than is the woman of There are married men who will pit the man of the future If Mr. Manga fiarian Is right concerning the iuquls: part of it. Chicago business men, having dl: covered that time is lost In eating ths might be to getting money will form a quick-lunch club. Why ni arrange some mechanical contrivanc that would" feed tlioui while they ar busy at their desks? Just think .stopping for a CO-ccnt meal, while I tlie same time a man might make least In his o Bice I LOOK I NXi UNTO By Her. H. Y. Look unto me, and be ye SAved.all the ends of the earth; foi- I nm God. and there Is none xlv.. Salvation Is not a luxury but a ne- cessity. It Is the greatest blessing be- cause It lasts the longest. Temporal things are transient, but this Is eternal. Sometimes you say, when n DIJIII 1ms done a foolinh thing. "He onlv rue It once." You mean ho will me It always. So God only saves us once, but his one salvation lasts forever. But you say. H Is not for me- 1 may ;-ui be unu of those whom God intends to Look again. To meet your difficulty there is other thought. This blessing Is for the largest possible? number. This verse luis a good, round sweep Its scope surely embraces you. See the earth Is exhorted to look, ami you surely, are Included In Hint. God so Look to him iu the tcrlptnre. In hit llr-, In hlB death. In his resurrection. In his glory. lo him HB God, Man, as Mediator, or Itedeemer. M Savior, as All In All. lawk to him when weak, for strength; when lick, for healing: when hungry, for food; when dark, for light; when dead, for life. Ixjok to him always. crossing a rushing torrent on a narrow bridge, the safest way Is to your-eye on n point on the opposite and keep looking; BO. In crossing life's stream, the only vure way IB to keep looking off unto Jesus. .When Simeon went Into the temple and paw the infant Christ he said, "Lord, now Idlest tliou thy servant drpnrt In peace." What was his rea- son? "For mine eyes have seen thy salvation." Aye. that Is It. To see Jesus Is to sco Ralvatlnn. ane lu sre (ttwl's salvation Is to lie ready to die. and to he ready to die Is to be pen arbitrated during the year, Mid I loved tlie world. Yea, bis love Is vast If a do-een or more are still pending aa creation, U Is not an island, nor real t> efore special Numerous Headship treaties that have been ne- otlated and the faet thut the Venexle- n episode with nil its intricacies led i no further international complica- oii3 still further attest the spirit of eace thnt is growing among the na- UILB. It ought to be a matter of pride o every American thnt tills country Is tklng a leading part In this movement. 'ot only lins It been a party to four rbitrations during the year, but its at- Hide in the recent Venezuelan dlfflcul- y has given this country high rank rnoTig the peacemakers. The appoint- ,ent of the Alaskan boundary tribunal s mill another evidence of our desire o settle our disputes with our neigh- >urs peaceably. country, nor a nation, that Is to loak. Not only Jews hat Gentiles. For It IB written. "In thec shall all families of the earth IK' None have w.inderi'tl too far. or have sinned too foully for the In- vitation of the text. t This birring conies to us wlib the best posslbk- socurliy. 'Tor I am God. and there is none else." GoU! "Why, if he bo Far. "I dare not A West Point cadet 1ms boon dis- missed for violating the rules and then lying about it. Secretary Koot, In in- dorsing the decree of the court-martini, wrote: "it Is of the first Importance that the cadets of the Military Acad- emy should diseounU-nnnce and abhor falsehood, however anil that tlie quibbling evasions of the de- fendant would be "more natural in a police court than In a company of ivrs and gentlemen." One might add, while echoing the Secretary's opinion. thai quibbling evasions are out of place In a police court. The action recently taken by the va- lous State Legislatures with nee to a constitutional amendment or the direct election of Senators by he people shown not only the wldc- prend Interest In the reform but tlie trcnjrtli of opinion In its favor where lie Issue has been brought to the test if a vole. It appears that thirty-six State Legislatures have had the pro- posal before them, and that of these ,wenty-one Uava indorsed It, while 'onrteen have failed to Indorse It. In only five Stales, Massachusetts, Maine, Pennsylvania, New York nnd Ohio, lias che proposal been voted on without carrying. Maine, however, diJ not finnily reject It, but postponed It to :he next session. In most of the other Stntes lhat are listed against It It wns hurled In committee, anil will surely be heard from in future legislatures. In one State. It passed one Uouse and In another It passed both houses but was vetoed by the Governor. Of the twenty-one States that have Indorsed the proposal nine went merely so far as to ask their Senators and Congress- men to vote for the submission of an amendment. The oilier twelve, how- ever, took tiie radical step of demand- Ing that call a constitutional convention to submit the amendment These twelve Slates are: California. Nevada. Illinois. North Carolina. Minnesota. North Dakota. Missouri Oregon. Montana. Ulali. Nebraska. Wisconsin. The federal Constitution has existed one hundred and fourteen years with- The struggle for success In life is more fiercely omiLpetitive than It ever wns nnrt the preparation for this strug- gle Is hocorniiiK more and more e.tnct- jjig. The echoal curriculum shows this to be so. 'Hie tendency to overload It stems to he Increasing to such nn c-s tent as to evoke the earnest protest of parents. A system which requires tlie ycmny pupil to spend many hours Jtl. anil more hours In home nturty to maintain a standing in the nnd lo jiri'pjire for ncrvc- mcking examinations itatur.illy pro- -vokes (lie criticism of parents, wlio are Jji-st able to judge of its balofnl effect tlie niiiuls nnd bodies of their chargrs. The youth whose time has U-en frittered a way on too many studies mny be t-aslly benten in the Jife struggle by the who has been confimd to a few essential studies, and lias made them a part of bia In- tellectual self. out tlie need- Of a. constitutional con- vention to revise it. Such a conven- tion will not necessary now, but It will only be when almost all of tlie required two-thirds of the States have ilemanded It that the privileged Senate will be Induced to yield to popular will and penult the submission of an irlment direct to tho States. The time Is doubtless not far distant when the twelve States that have made the call will find eighteen more arrayed at side, and the reform will he as- draw nigh to him. for It is  OKE8 DESCENDED FROM SEVEN' How Are All to Vew "It well knowa mnunp Joke wrl- the antiquary, "that there 1st iu the world only aeven VII the rojtt have been made, and still routliiue to be made, from these seven. 3ut It is not so known jtbat there re ouly seven anecdotes, out of which y Jngeulous blcndings aud twlstingB he unnumbered thousands of the world'a anecdotes are created. 'I am an amateur, or loving collec- or, of. anecdotes. When I ccme upon ne Utat striuigc to me I delight to race It bach to Its wnirce. I not the ame pleasure out of this .that an ety- mologist gets in tracing back to ill Snnakrlt root a disputed word. "Some time npo 1 heard of an anec- dote nlKHit Charles r.amb, the story went, was on a journey, and the :ime was that of the publication of the ngenlous stories for children that he and his sister Mnry had written In collaboration. I-a ml) said to one of bis fellow travelers: 'Have yon read l.nmb's "'No. hut I have n black sheepskin the other replied. 'This anecdote atrnck me pretty good, and 1 tried to truce It hack. For i Jong time I unsuccessful, but last week my eoarcli rewarded. I found the story from which the I.amb one was derived. It was the story of a traveler on a rainy flay wlio had left his wrap In a stage coach. After he luid gotten out he missed the wrap, and told the driver to go inside and Inquire for it The guard, putting his head within tlie door, called: lls there n black mackintosh was the reply, 'but there are two red ttcoord. "who walked with God." Higher up, yon recognize NVah, founder of n new nl Abraham, father of the Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses and are, one after another, sin- gled, out by the mind's eye. Hut with all the list enumerated by Paul In the eleventh chapter of Hebrews, there arc an Immense cumpnny bosldt's, wlio. though not so well kmi stand for The Detroit eonftrenre of the na- tloiw! congress of mothers favored uni- form divorce And denounced prlyxamy In Utah. It failed to define thedivoroe law which it would approve for tlie entire country. It must be pre- cmned that American motherhood would approve a law abolishing other States of the Union the counter- part of the Mormon Institution In Utah. ciillve polygamy nutftlde Utah dangerous to tbe future ef the Museum Js Years Olif. A museum of tlie sixth century, 11. O., has come Into the possession of the Uliiversily of i'ennsylvanin. Tho mu- seum Is not big, being contained In a large curtlien j.ir, IJIIL the cnnrenss are very valuable from a historical point of view. Whether the specimens wero exca- vated or purchased Is not known, but. hey undoubtedly represent a collec- tion wliti-h must have hren madi? dur- ing the time of Bclehazznr, since it was found in one of the upper stnita. at Nippur. The best specimen In the jar Is an inscription containing The of Snr- i I., who liver about 3800 B. C. There is a blnck stone tablet of llr- fJur. 2700 R. C.. which tells that ihis king built the great wall around the city of Nippur. Then there Is the terra coftn brick stamp of Rur-Sin. which is tho first yet found of that king. Another tab- let states that the large hall of the temple was, called Emakb. nnrl that there were twenty-four other to gods in The temple the ones lhat have been found of Bel nnd his consort, Beltlt. It's a rare man who dares guest lo dinner without first tatf wife. four more letters to It- Jesus only. Only look to Jesus. That is all. A simple thing. It Is not lo si rive to philosophize, to to look But you say, "I am charitabli my clmrlty avail me Notli Ing. "But J belong to a good family will that nvail me Noth Ing. Tho man who Is not charitable who does not belong to a good family who has not been piously trained, can look Just as well as you. Yon ant he stand on the same level. The en tranca is low down. Only look t Jesus. Only look to Jesus. That Is an In Btantaneous thing, and therefore th salvation Is im.neiliare. Find how Son. It takes to look, aud you discover long It dikes to he saved. Von may iwi haps not know the moment; but on thing you will know, lhat whereas yo were blind, yon see. Kvcn if yo !eet powerless yt-t look to him fnrpav er to look. "Behold the Lamb of Go< that takt'st the sin of the world. He takes the only look t Jesui. You are not to look for Jesus, H li not lost. A friend of mine at children's meeting told the little one a thing right and proper -that If Ihi found Jeaus tliey would be saved. little girl went and began to upset a the curtains in the cu tains, window curtains. Her mothe ID astonishment. Inquired the when the little innocent heart "Mother, teacher told us that if found Jesus we should be saved, aw! mother, I was looking for him." "Foe Ish you But more who try to discover a Christ pet notion, or dream, or feelli Imagination. not look for .lock to him. tn which yon nnd I are most closely ThcKi- nre men and women who have helped mold our character "by their witnessing power. Some wonderfully close ties bind us to the unseen world nnd we give them a place in I'liul's cloud of witnesses, d know that they are helping: us be jrong, because they themselves have. i. It Is not necessary to give stances; yon know. In-other; you ow, sister, "where your treasure Is, re will .your heart be also." The? mighty host of witnesses com- ssing us IK composed of those tyho restlfd with the U'lnpintlous of time d sense, jnst as you and I are doing. ie same means by which they over- me are open to us, We have mlllfoni nre witnesses tlmn David or Joseph id, yet they were the stronger be- use of those thnt witnessed em. Our opportunities are vastly perior, hence nur responsibility is uch greater, because of tbe itnessing of the Christian centurleB. As a nation we do well to remember ir beloved deiLil. better still, with aul, to place them amongst that grea ond of witnesses, eagerly watclilnj i who nre left behind to guard th crcd lllK-rty nnd Institutions they -afeguarded for us. The names Vaslilngton, Lincoln and McKlnley igethcr with a host of others on th merlc.in Itoll of will Incite r onsecrated living (he generations ye o crime. These all died In faith, no vine receiver! the promise; but LJ a vision of the coming grandeur o elr beloved cniintry nnd Ira place I leasing tlie families of the earth 'hey have left us tlie Inheritance tin ve, when our race shall have un, may witness In turn to onr sue May yon and I prove faltl ul, uniting our citizenship inseparabl with our religion. A BO It AN ARISTOCRACY Sy Her. Dr. Lett J nm the son nf a wnrkingmnn. An; iody who lays any claim to greatnes s. The arisrocrtiey In Ame ea is the aristocracy of labor. G ias no use for tlie idler. If a man is not doing the uscfu which Is all fJwl's lie Is doln the useless, which Is the devil's wor Does God love the the unions? I sn yes, if the unions will follow the "go len to   cnmfort lhat in thi' "dear old liumc." '11 never sleep the way they slep The  ot to lie Trusted. It is nn old joke, based on solid fact, that the man of letters Is regarded by the man of affairs as a person hardly to be trusted In the ordinary rela- tions of life. The English author, Tctt Ridge, told In a recent lecture before a London audience some new stories of the literary man and his reputation among plain honest folk. A man went to tbe country to take a house, lie saw the farmer, and car- ried, through the preliminary negotia- tions with satisfaction on both sides. Presently he asked, "Should you like some "No, said the farmer, genially, 'You are a gentleman. 1 can see- straight forwardness written your face. Don't bother the ref- erences. I espcet yon want to get back to your business In the city." "I have, nu business In the city." "Oh, Bald the farmer. "I sup- pose you bare outside the- city." "No, I am nn nntlior." cried the farmer. "Not an author that writes "Yes." A look of doubt crept over the farm- er's face. "Well, he sold, "to> turn back to the business we were talking about. 1 think, after all, I'll have to trouble you for one or two reffreneeK." Thus the literary prophet is without honor In the country. He also a poor thing In the eyes of the serving clnss. Jerome K. Jerome's servant pave notice that she intended to leave. Her mistress remonstrated and asked her why she. was going. I thought." she replied, "thai I had come Into the. of n gentleman, und I find that nijastcr writes plnys.'J the midshipman in of the boat and whispered these last words: "Ten days' black list for the crew for not giving way I" Shi Still lino One Lrft. -The iiiillim-r tolil me Ihnt she had been down to the dentist's to have a nerve killed. from Hie prices she aski for hats I should say (lie dentist must killed the wrong team an. Own Freach. you uwlentand the lan- guage wben'you were in Paris last wl len I ta Iked to. myself I Statesman. It be nlcp to be shown tha motber dtsplAvn to her fteepfag baby from Not Enough to Worry About. "One he said, with nn pffort when Miss Hrunet, the homely heiress- accepted bliu. "Ohl" she giggled, "I hate to kiss a man with n "Nonsense." lie replied. "Besidw, your mustache isn't very adelphia ledger. The Difference. The race horse uncommon Of oats he gets his fill; While man, who bets npon hhv, To meet the RTOcery bill. Star. It to no cumpHnent If a friend fifty inliea to your wedding, but It is tribute If be comers fire milet to funeral. poke sick man in the ft well man ofteaer Uuut   

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