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Mt Pleasant News Newspaper Archive: November 15, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Mt Pleasant News

Location: Mt Pleasant, Iowa

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   Mt Pleasant News, The (Newspaper) - November 15, 1947, Mt Pleasant, Iowa                               THE MT. PLEASANT NEWS Weather for lows tonight Sunday; somcwhH colder. Local temperatures: maximum Friday 42; minimum Friday night 33. Precipitation .6 of inch, MT. PLEASANT, IOWA SATURDAY EVENING, NOV. 15, CLARE TOLD THEM THE llAHIO EMPLOYS Ihe de- vice of Uie so-called forum lo give tlie impresslon-of .being all things to all men. Because an edilo.-ial policy is forbielden by FCC, these often become hilarious brawls during which the only way express an idea is to shout down the opponents, lo p'ush' into 'the fight, to raise one's voice .beyond civility. Clare Luce got into such a brawl with William Bullibt on her side and Vilo Mnrcantonio and Cor- h'ss Lamont on the other. Here Is an example of a typical street corner fight: "Marcantonio: What were those 150 million bullets? What were they gum or what? "Bullitl: What do you refer "Marcantonio: The 150 million that was shipped over there six months aso. 150 million bullets nol for American rifles, but for Chinese rifles. "Bullilt: Those "Marcantonio: No, those were chewing gum. "Lamonl: Say, lei me get in on this, will In another place happens. "Luce: _ Gracious, Ihis begins to sound exactly like the UN, anc somobcdy around here sounds like "Marcantnnio: It sounds' a liltlc bil more like "Luce: Don'l run down the Con- gress like that. "Marcantonio: That's all right When you refer lo anything sound- ing like Vishinsky, I say this sounds like Mrs. Luce, when you used to agree with me on occasion. "Granik: Just a Mi's. Luce a chance to answer Ihat. please, Congressman. "Luce: As I don't follow a party line, I can find it possible occasion- ally to agree with even you. "Marcantonio: Now you are fol- lowing a 'Big Trust1 line, nol a parly line." Is this fun? When Mrs. T.uce quotes from a Soviet official textbook to this ef- "Thc pupils of -the Soviet Echodl must realize that the feel- ings of Soviet patriotism arc satu- rated -with irreconcilable hatred towards .the enemies of the Socialist Corliss Lamont replies: "What they really mean there, is Ihat the children of the Sovicl Union should fight for Socialism against Capitalism. It is not. a hatred being taught against any country or any people, because the Union believes in complete national and racial democracy and has. no anli-seinilism or anything of that Then Clare gets Lamont good and proper. He right in and gels it on the chin. Here is the col- loquy: "Luce: Mr. Lamont, as you have been a member of orer 100 Com- munist-front "Lamonl: That is ridiculous. That is "Luce: I have them right liere- "Lamont: Who is smearing now, Mrs. Luce? Who is dealing in per- sonalities, now? "Luce: Oh, do you think it is a smear to be called a Communist? "Lamont: Go ahead, my friend. "Luce: Well, I thought you like the Communists. "Lamont: Go ahead. "Luce: Goodness, I thought they were your friends and you were de- fending them. "Lamont: Well, Hitler hated the Communists, too. "Luce: oh, Hitler hated them! "Mnrcantonio: Yes, and he used the hate of Communism In order to plunge .this world into World War II, and you people are using h a tjc of Co m m u n i s m t o this world into World War III. Thai's what you arc doing I am thinking of the boys who are going to die. "Luce: It seems to me lhal the only one of "Grnnik: Let Mrs. Luce finish, Mr. Turnout. "Luce: Tiie only one of the fom of us who really has any claim to knowledge of Russia is Mr. Bullitt who was ambassador there. I think he should be allowed to talk about'Russia. It goes on nnd on that way, no one arguing to thc point became apparently Marcanlonio was there keep it strictly personal and lo prevent the subject, "the Sovicl Union's policies in world from being discussed. Well, that was that. It Is a pak- tern. The radio must amuse. II must excite. Its, tempo must be fast, The minutes tick nwny. Watches arc held In hand. Sig- nals come from the wings. Every- body Is And ersoiLResigns as Univ. of I owa Place Blame In Train Crash at Morning Sun Des Mcines. Iowa to properly, control .the speed of a train moving within yard limits was blamed today as causing a rear end collision between two freight trains of the Minneapolis and St. Louis railway company ncnr Morning Sun on September 20th.. The engineer of cue cf tlie trains was killed and four other employ- ees injured In the accident. The safety engineer's report to the slate commerce commission said the collision was caused by responsibility to do so resting on that -train. Tlie train was made up of two I engines and crashed into the rear! of the second train. tiie "allure to properly control speed of one of the trains. The report said that the crew of train No. 010 had lo pass through the yards at Morn- ing Sun under control with one BlueVT-ax- Plan Told Des Moines, la. Rcbert D. Blue's "flexible payment" They'll Do It "JEVefy time 'WEEKLY BRAIN WOULD you SAV "THAT THE YOUNG LAPY IS RELATEP TO THE GENTLEMAM IN THIS-PICTURE? By Jimmy Hatlo rHAT RELATION IS THE NOT-SO-yOUNS LADY TO THE SAME 6ENTLEMAN IN THIS state income tax plan provides for a sliding scale of tax pendent upon the general fund sur. the obligation plus, it was disclosed today. The plan calls for the full 100% rate if the slate surplus Is j 000 or less; 75% if it .reaches 00% if it climbs lo 000 and 50% if il goes to or more. The stale executive council under the proposed plan, would supervirc Two Iowa mining equipment I the determination of the surplus firms submitted bids lo the War selling up the rate each year Nevers Bids On Wisconsin Plant Assets Administration for an ore concehtraticn plant near Platte- Wi-o., which both wish to purchase for resale. Harry Alter and Sons, cf Davcn NO-NO, SUSAR- A BOWLING BALL-NOTA BASKET BALL-" SE IT HAS HOLES FOR YOUR ITTV PINK FINGERS'- FINISH YOUR RUN ON YOUR LEFT FOOT "-ANP THROW THE JUST THROW THE ANP SEE WHAT HAPPENS BALL OUT IN FRONT OF YOU, HONEY. CLASS DISMISSEP ANDTHEHATLO TISCOFFEP EPPIE COREY 23 KENOSHA, Capacity Crowd Sees H. S. Play "Best Fool Forward" Is Presented A capacity crowd enjoyed the Jrescntalipn of "Besl Pnnt. Pnr- had the posed bill and in case sufficient sen- j liment is shown might have the proposal submitted to the legis-1 Inters. Joit, hid while A. W Nevcrs, of Mt. Pleasant, offered S20.557 for the plant. The bids were nkcn under advisement by the WAA zone real properly office in O I i With bnow Blanket Tlie properly consists of a steel up wit: race eacn year. ._______ ,-ernor Blue is reported to have m -.T Glve Dormer New Londo nGirlOn More In Exp edition To Iran t Youth Drive frame mill-building with a floor Des Moines, Iowa covered with a blanket of we'J machinery, and 4 5 acres of snow today with Port Dodge re- It Was OPeratrv] rim-incr 111.-, r.-.._ The goal in the Mt. Plcasanl Youth Chest drive which is sched- uled for next Tuesday and Wed- neseiay is as compared with last year. This means that giving mutt be Mrs. Donald McCown, who will accompany her husband in the of Chicago's expedition JIUHI 01 to Iran, is the daughter of Mr. tlle Persian Gulf near Ahwnz has and Mrs. Cecil Davev Df New Lon- 11r'1' don. Icwa. Al-thcugh Ihis is he fy the period and cultural rem- nants likely .to be found in the mcunds. The area at tlie head of at leasl 50 percent morn than ui wun ron 'and. It was operated during tire porting a five inch fall war by the TlnlfnH ivTnunn- I .T.I "u tin, ujuiu Mining eompam t Cr reportcd iliyear commit tail nls while hP 'Ws momla' aL lee "H City and Spen- The money is to be aUocated a metals. I---------- WitJ UI1U OJJU11- production of critical with light rains reported over most of the rest of the stale. The sncw started falling.late-yes- the entire stale. Other reports inelud- four inches at Atlantic and j Mason City; at 3 at Des Moines and 2 8 at Cedar Rapids. The heavy snow caused some! damage -to telephone circuits with] In keeping with requests for pro- communfcalions down between grams of various phases of home Amcs nnd Des Moines this morning. and school relationships, the P.T. A. I- is offering a very important and Ovf me' most interesting session, Tuesday I night, Nov. 18, at p. m. in the TWO UniniUrCd PTA Bringing Boys Secretary Here for Address follows: Girl Scouts.............. Boy Scouts 20 Student Center.......... 750 High School Band (The band has earned and saved and expects to earn more this year. They need an additional to buy sixty new uniforms.) High School Auditorium. Leon H. Smith, boys secretary of the Des Moines y. M. C. A., will present his illustrated lecture, "Lifes Creation And You.' After 25 yonrs of research and! EXPLANATION' OF DRIVES Some confusion has developed because two will be in progress here nevt Thc one the Youth Chrst drive 'for local Mrs. L. C. Bisplinghoff and her I projects; the other is thc Iowa work with youth, Mr. Smith nephew, Oliver Amick, of Caffee, j Mo., escaped injury when the car I in which they were riding plunged down a 25 foct embankment just ranged this lecture on Sex Hygiene Sirtc of the Bosttm bridge south of Donnellson Friday evening. Amick, who was driving at the time of the accident said the cat- started to skid as they came off of tlie bridge heading north on Ihe to present to boys at the Des Moines Y. M. C. A. Camp. His presentation was so well done that lenders of character building organizations, throughout the middle west are de- manding his services. With the surveys he has made in connection with these he has contacted thousands of youth laS U wcnt dmvn the bank anti and has a renl cross-section an "P''i6ht position.-.- of youth- what youth lacks and! T'le wns 'o Ml. 'Pleasant Saturday morning. I Damage was estimated between j and slippery pavement and v.-ent off the road before it could he brought under control. The car rolled once what it needs in regard to the un- derstanding of sex hygiene. You will be pleased with this mes- j sage, its simplicity, Us accm-acv its dignity. Constructive thinking may REPEATS THAT MEYERS prevent many problems later. CHRISTMAS SEALS TO GO IN MAILS SOON One of these days, the local post office will be handling hundreds of long envelopes bearing the return address of the Henry County Tu- berculosis Association. No post office worker, no recipient of one ASKED PAYMENT i Washington, D. C. McCarthy, former vice-president for I Howard Hughes, repented under oalh today his charge that Major Children's Home Society, not a local project. Both .ire jrood anil worthy. The Youth Chest drive has a goal cf in Mt. ricasa-nt. The Imva Children's Home Society has n goal of for the county Snpt.. C. A. Coltrell is chairman of (he Youth Chest Drive; JMrs Charles Atwell and Mrs. .Toe. Virdcu are chairmen of thc Children's Home society drive. The Youth Chest drive sched- uled for Tuesday ami Wednesday. Thc Cbililrcii's Home Society drive s scheduled to stnrl Monday. This effort to clarify the situation is made because of the even among solicitors themselves. Solicitors should familiarize them- selves with which project arc working so thai (hey can properly present their rccjuesls. explaining the drive and the projects for which the money will be used will be de- livered -to all business houses and all homes of Mt. Pleasant Mon- ui IUL. r-ieasant ivion- "I0tt MCyC''S' aSkC.d hlm "ftomoon. Grade school ciiil- lor a S.lO Oflfl f. to know contents. The envelopes, of course, contain Christmas seals, the funds of which for a down payment' on a pest war job with thc millionaire plane builder. McCarthy also supported Hughes on testimony that Meyers unsuc- loan to buy government bonds. Meyers who denied McCarthy's borcuirt, dtoSC tl" Cted be s he year around. The mld demanded that the grey haired UHLL6 01 uie 1947 Seal Sale are Inltnnipv f t'f t faced his principal accuser In to- introduction to archaeloglcal ex peditions, she lias traveled EX tcnsively, having served with tli Red Cross in Europe for two year en Guam for one year, and as a instructor at an American Schoo for boys in Baghdad. Mr. McCown spoke in Mt Pleasant at a Kiwanis mealing few weeks ago. following tells of their ex pcdlticn to Iran soon. The first American "digging" ex- icdilion in Western Asia since Ihe war will g-et under way this month when two University of Chicago archaelogisls and their wives sail on .the Vulcn.nia from New York November 22, for Greece, and even- ually to excavation siles in Iraq Braidwood, field di- of the Iraq project, will be Jarticipnting in his seventh Asiatic rchaelogical excavation when lie els up tent camp adjacent to a round at Qara yitagh in Iraq Associated with the Oriental Insti- tute, he is an assistant professor ot Old World Prehistory and Anthro- pology at the University. Braidwood will be accompanied o Expedition by his wife children. Donald E. McCown. research as- scciale in thc Oriental and acting field director of tlm" Iranian project, will work in ni, at the head of the Persian Gulf John Mc- south of Ahwa2. Hewil, h-avel over''11''0 "lnmberS N' L section of Iran to locate any ar- chaeloyically interesting ancient and to do field research md Iran. Kcberl J. nol been explored archaelogically Ircfcre. The McCowns, with the aid of Persian workmen, will make small "test digs" al various mounds lo determine where future exten- sive diggings should be made. McCown's first Asiatic expeditions were made to PalcMine .for two years under auspices ol the Ameri- can School of Oriental Research. Then he spent five seasons working at Persepolis In Iran for the Uni- versity of Chicago's-Oriental Insti- tute. Discoveries which lie may make in his three-month period in Iran should help correlate the cultures of Iran and southern Iraq. It has been difficult to dale Iranian cultures, because writing was intro- duced later In Iran Umn it was in Iraq. By revealing Ihe Inler-re- ation with the neighboring .coun- rics dates can be more accurately assessed to much of Iran's culture. The McCowns will work in Iran rom January through March, then hey will join the Braidwoods in raq. Part of their work will be one in cooperation with the rench Archaelogical Mission at lisa. vard." Ihe annual all high Jrescnled a I the high school audi- orium Friday evening. Doris Prlckelt, gave a superb per- formance in her role as Ihe blind dale. Other outstanding per- formances were given by Jerry Lin- 'der as Dr. Recbcr, Bill Zickefoosc as Professor Lloyd, Barbara Crane as Gale Joy and Pat Benford as Helen Schlessinger. Others in Ihe cast included Gary Caldwell, Joe Morgan, Charles Case, Lee White, Rollie Ristine, Berry Payne, Ann Cottrell, Bessio Cal- ihoun, Virgil Egli, Vernon Sliafer, Roger Anderson and Carol Scham- Per. The production staff in charge of Ihe play included Dean Travis I director; John Condie, assistant, Nancy Rogers, prompter; Shu-ley Blum, -John Condie, Doris Thomas and Reggie Gervais, make- up; Roger Lessci'gcr, Richard Eland and Alax Strothaion, stage crew. loose Talk" Leads Him Tc Take Action Iowa City, la. Eddif Ancld-snii, head fastball coach-at Seek Killer Of Surgeon the University of Iowa, handed his resignation to President Virgil M. Handier early today. Handier confirmed he had ac- cepted the resignation, and said it would be passed to the board of control of athletics today. There was some question whether the board would accept the resignation The board Is not expected to meet to act on the resignation until Mon- day night. The football coach said that "loose talk" about thc state had in- duced him to take, the action. He had made a sudden decision in the matter since he had told friends previously lie had decided to "stick t out as coach." Anderson who is under a a year contract extending through j the 1950 season, said his resignation was effective July I, 1948. I Anderson came to Iowa in 1939 from Holy Cross nnd was named as I Ihe coach of the year with his well- J known Iron Man team lhal year., i Youth Hear Talk on Safety I LaCrosse, Wis. four state alarm was broadcast today EscaPinE of bottle gas on your for a killer of a prominent LaCrosse W'" yOU solld" was a surgeon who was shot to dealh and'tCment Whlch starlled ei6hteen' then dumped out of his car onto Henry Rural Youtn mcn1'- a main Wisconsin highway as they llstened lo T- Wil- son in a talk on safety. Accidents farm homes, from farm ma- The body of the victim, Dr. James i McTjOone, 49, was found.on highway 18 Just outside the LaCrosse city chinery, highway causes of', ac- cidents and ways to prevent t'he'm Wilson dis-. llmils last night about a half hour after he was. called from his home--------, to treat a patient various laws' wnich At least three bullets had been thc safety rural red intn !lnfl others. Tlie program under the direction i of Marjorie Moore ahd Maxine. umvorsny Braidwood I LONDON WOMEN Vccompanled'LonBurVIraqi ATTEND ART EXHIBIT" m OTHER NEWS NOTES NDW London-Mrs. John Tim- :f mons- Hcnry county chairman of fired into the surgeon's head. Tiie alarm asked officials of Wis- consin, Illinois, Minnesota and mcluded a Qulz automobile which is mlssinc consisting of 40 true-false questions: "Dry Cleaning Clo'.hes may, be safely done within Ihe home" was the question which tripped up sev- eral from receiving higher scores. Walter Miller was top-ranking score with 39 out of 40 questions correct. The rest of Ihe evening was spent in singing safety songs. The nexl meeting will be Friday, automobile which is missing. Top National Blue Ribbon Sale M-S e memers cf thc N. L Wo- man's club, attended the art exhibit and tea at Salem Friday afternoon sponsored by the' Salem Wom-in'i rlllu m uo IlPJfl VV UJIlilll S preliminary to eslablisilg dCPartmCnt inn iif. f..i__ mounds, lien ut sites there in future seaso McCown will also A cow and a heifer raised by thc Hcnry County Home lopped thc U. S. national blue ribbon sale In their classes at Waukesha, Wis., on Nov. Tlie two animals had been sold by the County Home and were sold by an individual at the sale. Tlie fact that they lopped their classes is a credit to Ihe qualily of the County Home herd. Nov. 21, a party in Salem Hall. Explosion Breaks Wayland Window r relumctl Dny. The mile Chrislmas Seals are much more Ihan an attractive holi- day decoration. day's session. McCarthy told the cemmittee he advised Hughes thai he thought it nny deeoratioi, They the was wrong to confer IIk g d Ivmg force behind the greatest curcmcnt officer nnt nf life saving campaign known to man flehfagnlnsl tuberculosis. curement officer out of government service during the war. llio no: not a second to waste. Keep Flash, dash, smnsh-whnt, the hell I (Copyright, A marriage license has been Is- drcn will assist in distributing information. Quotas for the city are as fol- lows Business district (to be solicited by Goal Line Ware1 Ward Ward 3- Ward special gifts and other The business district so'.icitalioi is to be made Tuesday and the residential drive on Wednesday. by his wife. Thursday from a few day Mecown and his wife will nt the homc over the Iran countryside by jeep and-trailer. They will be on the v cok-cut for ancient mounds nick' John "g up pottery and t.yin tid'e i! daughler. Mr. Menvin Hill, anc family in Galesburg, 111. Mr and Mrs. John Cook lef Thursday for Amarillo, U visit at the home of their son, jncl Cook, and family. Scouts To Have Coon Roast Tickets Being Offered For Iowa-Minnesota Game to the Iowa-Minnesota game were being offered freely here Satuitlay morning at "no charge." The unfavorable wonllior had uncle many ticket holders field, ctllcrs worc Coving, however, flur- ing the late morning to attend the of Vv frame. a ICO will meet at their cabin at Snug Harbor above Oakland Mills for a coon roast Sunday evening. Novem- ber 16 nt p. m. The raccoon meal is being fur- nished by Lee Simpson, mate of thc troopship. All those who are interested in senior scouting rma> attend and shculd contact skipper William Van Brusspl or Art Norton before Sunday evening. Will Introduce Rationing Legislation Washington, D. C. Mn, democrat of N. Y., announ- ced today that ho will Introduce Cftlslntlon. empowering President Trumnn lo resloro price control, ntlonlng nnd the allocution of commodities. to their home in Des Moines. Mi- Douglass, a past worshipful mnstci of the New London Lodge. A F. and A. M was here ID nUend thc meeting Monday .evening honoring J. V. Gray, Grand Master of Iowa, and Rev Grand Chaplain, George Hunt, both of Mt Pleasant. Representatives of' 1C lodges were present. A leani from the Burlington shops at, West Bur- lington conferred the third degree A chicken plo dinner was sen-eel. MKMOItlAJ. HOSPITAL NOTDS Hodgcr Whnlcy a (omllcctomy lalient Saturday. Dismissed Sat- urday-were Mrs. Fred Yminwny of Lockrldge and Glen H. Smith. Dismissed "Friday were Virgil Ayer nnd Mrs. Evcrctl Hamey. leaking from an oven caused an explosion at the Wayland Cafe Wednesday cvsning 7 o'clock. When Mr. Socler- grcn wenl to light a burner on tlie stove, the pressure of the ignited gaf blew out the entire glass front rent free. on the east side. No one was hurl ncr any other damage done. Car- penters boarded up tiie window business went on as usual. LIBRARY OBSERVING NATIONAL BOOK WEEK, NOV. 16-23 New Bocks for "the Wcrld of Tomorrow is the theme of National Book Week. Nov. 16 to 23. la its observance, the H. J. Nugen public library has a num- >bor of especially interesting ex- hibits. A -great many new books have been received and are being placed in circulation at this lime including 00 of adult fiction, 2S adult non fiction; SB for juveniles. The sound projector is being used mere often as people of the com- munity learn that it can be used The record players are WILL DISCUSS USE OF FARM ELECTRICITY Farm.'tcad wiring, lighting an appliances will be discusse it an REA meeting to be held a he Mt rle.isiuit high school o Tuesday evening, Nov. 18, al Miss C. Agnes Wilson, REA horn economist, and Fred McVey, REj viring and electric use advisor, wil peak. jeneral Strike Called Rome, Italy general Irike was called in Rome today in communist led protest, to thc ar rcsl of a trolley conductor while a wave of communist violence struck al 10G Ilnllan elites and towns. A mob of more thnn com- munists assaulted the barracks In the Uiscan city oC Clhlusl In an ef- fort to liberate five former Italian partisans held on a murder charge. also being pUjt into gocd use and records may be borrowed in the same manner as are Ihe books. The second floor of the library building is being remodeled and bj utilizing waste space the board ex- perts to make three modern apart- ments in place of the former two. TORNADO DAMAGE IS HALF MILLION Ueviddcr, La. (INS) Damage from a small tornado which cut 00 yard path -through Dcrldder wa estimated today at The wind demolished or damage nore Ihan 100 buildings and ici-LOiis were treated for Injury. 1 SimPKISK! George Van Iloutcn cf Evcrly ha ron suffering from headaches am leek pains. He entered n Sioux City hospital for treatment and wns urprlsed to find that his neck Imc een broken In an automobile nc- dcnt last June, one vertebrae dug broken and another one upllii. red. Ills nock been put, In ist which he will wear for thc next six or eight weeks,   

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