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Moulton Weekly Tribune Newspaper Archive: July 10, 1958 - Page 1

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Publication: Moulton Weekly Tribune

Location: Moulton, Iowa

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   Moulton Weekly Tribune (Newspaper) - July 10, 1958, Moulton, Iowa                                MoTiTTON Weekly Tribune LXXIV, 1958 -Services Will Be Held Friday John Kerby, 86, long time and well known farmer of this community, died at the St. Joseph hospital in Centerville, early Tuesday morning. He had been, ill for the past two weeks. He was the son of Joe and Mel bina Kerby and was born July 11, 1872 on the farm south of Moul-ton where he had lived all his life. Mr. Kerby was married to Al-ica Howell in 1885 and to this union four children were born. The living are Lonie Horn and Clay Kerby of Moulton; Lester Kerby of Bloomfield. Nine grandchildren and several great grandchildren are also left to mourn his death. His wife and one daughter Floy, preceded him in death, and also a sister. He was a member of the Coats-ville Baptist church. Mr. Kerby was a man of high integrity and during his farm operations in this community made many and lasting friends. Funeral services will be held at the Christian church in Moulton, Friday afternoon at two o'clock conducted by the Rev. Will Cleeton of Seymour. Burial will be in the Cannon cemetery, south of Moulton. JUST BETWEEN YOU AND ME MOULTON, IOWA-"THE TRUTH FIRST, IF POSSIBLE" VENTURE CAPITAL AND PRIVATE ENTERPRISE CARL GOLDENSTEDT DIES SERVICES WERE SUNDAY ORLEANS SOCIAL HOUR MET AT SINGLEY HOME Orleans Social Hour Club met at the home of Edith Singley, June 19 with Agnes Archer as co-hostess. The meeting was opened by singing, "Wonderful Words of Life", and Anita reading "Husbands in the Bible". Roll call was, "What Amusement You Like Best", and was answered by: Hanna and Bessie Kirby, Velta and Joann Davis, Hilda Hanes, Agnes Archer, Bessie McDade, Anita Winans, Shirley, Dora and Edith Singley. Children present were: Glenda and Randy Kirby, Chris Davis, Shelly, Robbie, Diann, Doug and Ricky Singley. Visitors were Myrtle and Joan Singley. Mystery box was won by Agnes  Archer. A discussion- was held on plans for the Jamboree. Velta had the program. Ida and Hanna received mystery gifts. The next meeting will be with Ethel Allen, with Esther Moore co-hostess. Roll call will be a short cut you have learned in re-finishing furniture. NOTICE Bond school home coming will be Sunday, July 27 at Pulliam Park in Moulton. Officers are pres., Harold Davis, vice pres., Mrs. Geo. Brundage, sec.-treas. Mrs. Inez Rohl. The program committee is Mrs. Garl Catherall, Mrs. Marvin Howard, and Ralph Mikel. A picnic dinner will be served at the noon hour. Everyone welcome. Tuesday evening dinner guests at the home of Mrs. Helen Grayit were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bacher and son, Robert of Burlington, Mr. and Mrs. Perry Norton of Bloomfield, Mr. and Mrs. Junior Douglas, and Randy of Newton, and Mrs. Lena Guinn and daughter, Francis. Dinner guests at the Clint Rif-enberry home Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Marlin Winger and family of Rockford, 111.; M. and Mrs. John Spears of Moline, 111.; Claud Rifenberry of Ottumwa, and Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Rifenberry. Other recent guests were Mr. and Mrs. Doc Dixon and son of Ottumwa; Junior Dixon of Hay word, Cali.; Donnie Davis of Davenport, and Linda Spears of Dean. Mr.nad Mrs. E. W. Kirby were visitors at the home of Mrs. Eva Havens in Mystic, July 4. We thought we had it made when we put up a recently acquired porch swing, but it turned out to be a passing fancy. Not that the swing didn't fit in with our mood to sit and rock but other road blocks were placed in our path. First 'off our youngest daughter seems to think it was put up for her personal use. Too, the granddaughter has a yen to carve her initials in the swing. As of this moment we have had little opportunity to sit and swing and relax. T Fact is, certain handicaps have developed. Seems like our youngest thinks that you must swing high wide and handsome, and as a result, our first step out the back door almost knocked us flat. There's got to be some sort of warning signal devised. Some day, when the newness wears off, we're going to be able to enjoy the swing. Until that time arrives we'll have to be content to watch two of our favorite gals perform. + Cool weather here again. Thermometer down to 50 in early morning but swings upward during the day. What's all this doing to the crops? We asked a farmer friend of ours about crop prospects and he told us the corn never looked better, that the beans were literally bustin', and the oats crop would be excellent. Hay? Tons of it. All this with the weather far from being perfect for growing. But-we have had rain. Nearly two inches over the week end. + Bill Horn continues to impress on our mind that he's a handy man around the house-particul-arily in the garden. Says the potatoes are bustin' the roasting ears poppin' and the onions de-lish. But what about the tomatoes, William? We like the I. S U. and the company personnel, but bless their little pea pickin' hearts we could have gladly given them the treatment yesterday afternoon when we got a power interruption. Tied us up tighter than a jug for more than two hours. Stopped the automatic press, froze the metal in the linotype which made us wait an additional hour over and above the blackout while we waited for the metal to heat. In other words we were stopped cold. And right at a time when every second count ed. If it had been storming and lightning and raising thunder in general our blood pressure wouldn't have gone up to such a high point. But it was a beautiful day. A day made to breeze along. And there we were doing the slow burn. Yes, there are days like that-many of them, t It mattered not to this tired soul that it was road workers dynamite that caused the trouble. It was our time to gripe. So we just griped. + We are always happy when we hear of someone hieing themselves off on a vacation, but we can't understand why neighbor Earl Brown selected roasting ear time to head for Utah. 'Not that i we're complaining for along with Paul and Arminta Pedrick we're keeping the patch pretty well trimmed. And we can report to Brownie that they were delicious. + How's the wheat doing? Edwin Boettcher tells us that his made 40 bu. to the acre. But Dick Burger up Unionville, Iowa, way takes the cake with his 50 bu. wheat. Next! THURSDAY, JULY 10, No. 21 Another Appeal In Council Asks For Slightly Higher Levy Next Year _      i It's budget time and in this issue the city presents its estimate of funds necessary to conduct the business of the town for the period from July 1, 1958 to July 1, 1959. It will require a little more tax money to conduct the business of the town this year than it did last year. According to budget figures the town spent $17,189 during 1957. The proposed expenditure for 1958 is $22,400. However, a major part of the increase will be taken care of from non-tax sources. A $900 increase in taxes is made necessary by the erection of the new addition to the town hall, and replacing some sidewalks on city owned property The county conferenre board and county board of education also presents their budgets in this issue. RADAR SPEED DETECTOR IN OPERATION HERE Wednesday night of last week Sgt. James Douglas of the Iowa Highway Patrol had a radar speed indicator in use on the road north of Moulton; This stretch of road is commonly called the local "drag strip". Mayor Dean Duley who watched the radar equipment in operation reported that no violations were noted, but several motorists stopped to inquire if they were wanted for anything. The radar device used was placed on the front fender of Sgt. Douglas' patrol car. It's beam extends down the road about 300 feet and when an oncoming car hits the beam the speed is recorded by a meter located on top of the equipment. It does little good to apply the brakes once you have hit the beam at a high rate of speed as your top momentum has already been automatically recorded. J. P. Robert Daniels was also present to watch the operation of the radar equipment. Lingering Illness Proves Fatal To Craig Daniels Carl Francis Goldenstdt son of Henry and Ollie Goldenstdt was born June 25, 1909 at the farm home near Monterey, Iowa. Carl spent his entire life at this home except three years spent with the United States Air Force during World War II. He entered the service November 4, 1942 and served his country well during the three years of service having received four overseas bars, a European, African, Middle Eastern theatre ribbon, a Good Conduct medal and a World War II Victory Medal. While in England he attended a sheet metal school at Blackpool and for six weeks worked as a combat sheet metal man, repairing planes damaged in combat. Upon his discharge from the Service, November 26, 1945 he returned to his farm home to be associated with his father with the farm work. On July 5, 1958 at 12:15 a. m, 'he passed away, after suffering a lengthy illness, at the age of 49 years and 10 days. He was educated in the public schools of Davis County. He leaves to revere his memory: his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Goldenstedt; a sister, Mrs. Geneva Jennings and a nephew, Carl Lee Jennings all of Bloomfield, Iowa; An aunt, Mrs. Iva Lawson of Bloomfield, Mrs Sophia Johnson of Moulton; Mrs. Mary Quinon of Englewood, California; Mrs. Annie McGraw of Tulsa, Oklahoma, many relatives and a host of friends. Carl's presence with us will be greatly missed, but the pleasant memories of his life shall be remembered. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Quentin Johnson from the Wagler Funeral Home Sunday afternoon July 6, at 2:00 p. m. Interment was made at the Burgher Cemetery. School Matter To Be Made Soon The Moulton-Udell planning committee will appeal their case to the state board of education. This move was made necessary by a stalemate of the Davis and Appanoose county boards when the proposed local plan was handed to them for a decision. It will be remembered that Appanoose county's five member board voted for the plan and the five Davis county members cast a negative vote. At the  meeting held Tuesday night, Charley Pettit, attorney for the local plan, gave a brief resume of what had transpired at the last meeting and explained the   various   courses left   open. Following that school directors from all the districts represented at the  meeting  were  caucused and it was their unanimous cision that every effort should made to keep the Moulton-Ud plan alive, and they instruc; the steering committee to p' ceed with plans for the appeal. It is understood that the action will be brought  by   the   Appanoose county board of education and the Moulton,   Udell,  Wells, and Orange districts. The meeting Tuesday night was fired by the many expressions that the maintenance of a high school for the affected districts irt this area is a must, and that a consolidated effort would be put forth to see that the Moulton-Udell plan would be okayed. The appeal is now being put in the form of a brief and will be followed by a public hearing before the state board of education. The date of the hearing will be announced at a later date. Craig Emil Daniels, son of Warren Taylor and Eliza Craig Daniels, was born March 8, 1886 in Jackson County, Ohio and departed this life July 7, 1958 1PFC. TERRY PIATT IN FIELD EXERCISES HAROLD WRIGHT BREAKS BONE IN LEFT FOOT IN MOVING ACCIDENT JOE HUTCHISON RELEASED FROM VETERANS HOSPITAL Army Pfc. Terry D. Piatt, son -   of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W. Piatt, no"T ,,,,,  ,, at Moulton, recently participated in the age of 72 years, 3 months and a field training exercise with the 29 days in the Davis County 8th Infantry Division's 68th Ar-Hospital, Bloomfield. He had mor in Germany, been in poor health for the past A tank driver in the armor's year, and in the hospital the past Company A in Baumholder, Piatt two weeks. entered the  Army in  May 1957 When he was eight years of and arrived in Europe the follow-age the family moved from Ohio ing December. REV. CLEVENGER GOES TO KANSAS PULPIT Joe Hutchison who underwent surgery at the Veterans Hospital in Des Moines recently was released Tuesday and is now convalescing at the home of his brother, William. MAYORS COURT WAS BUSY LAST WEEK Rev. Hubert Clevenger will close his pastorate at the Moulton Church of God (Holiness) this coming Sunday evening" at which time he will bring his farewell message. Rev. Clevenger has been called to an Iola, Kans. charge. to Moulton, Iowa, and he resided in this community for the remainder of his life. He was educated in the Moulton school and attended Iowa State College, at Ames. On March 31, 1913 he was united in marriage to Vivian lone Black, and to this union was born two daughters. The memory ot nim will be forever cherished by his wife, Vivian and daughters, Marjorie Buchanan of Ottumwa, and famine Baker of Ciudad Piar, Venezuela, and his only grandchild, Nancy Buchanan. He is also survived by one brother Ward Daniels, and one sister, Lizzie Wood both of Moulton, as well as sever al nieces and nephews The 21-year-old soldier is a 1954 graduate of Moulton High School and was formerly employed by Maytag, Newton, Iowa. STOCKHOLDERS VOTE TO CHANGE ARTICLE NOTICE TO REBEKAH MEMBERS Mayor Dean Duley's court was a busy place the past week with several traffic violators arraingn-ed before him. Robert Harris appeared in the mayor's ocurt and was fined $7.50 for disturbing peace with a def-fective muffler; Gary Kerby paid a $12.50 fine for reckless driving; Allen Swarts paid a like fine on a like charge; Gary Jackson was arraigned on a reckless driving charge but no disposition has been made of the case as yet. In addition to the fines, points will be taken as set out by safety commission ruling. There will be a called meeting on Thursday, July 10, at 8:00 P. M. for the purpose of conducting initiation. All officers urged to be present. Myrtle Starr, N. G. LOCAL NINE WINS FROM FLORIS SUNDAY At the meeting of stockholders of the local telephone company held Tuesday night the vote was 23-1 to change the articles of incorporation but it is still a question of the legality of the move. While the meeting was primarily called to change the articles, stockholders also heard some vital information concerning dial tele-.=> , phones from Mr. Day who is in- He was | stalling the dial system at Blakes Harold Wright says that moving household goods is far more hazardous than being a Wabash brakeman or conductor. Harold has been employed by the Wa-bas for more than fifteen years and has never had a reportable accident. But not so when it comes to moving household goods. Two weeks ago he moved from Des Moines to Moulton and in the process let a refrigerator fall on his left foot. At the time he thought little of the accident but the pain continued and last Thursday he went to a doctor where it was found that he had a broken bone in his foot. It will be about six weeks before the injured member is ready for service again. preceded in death by his parents, burg and Moravia. Directors here one sister Emma Pennington, and are seeking some way to convert infant   grandson, Craig   Daniel Moulton to the dial system. Baker. He was a devoted husband and father and a good neighbor always willing to give a helping hand to any in need. For his only ATTENDED RAINBOW MEETING IN CENTERVILLE PLANTS ARE TAKEN FROM SALES HOME The Moulton baseball team annexed an easy 12-3 victory last Sunday from Floris. The game was played there. Pfannabaker was on the mound for Moulton and limited Floris to three bing-les. This Sunday the locals will play Agency on the local diamond. Game time will be 2:00 o'clock. "OPERATION HAND LIFT" STARTED IN APPANOOSE -----.....----- _     Want to help a neighbor in dis- grandchild, Nancy, he held a spec tress? Then the opportunity is ial love and devotion. here. Appanoose county has start- Mr. Daniels was well known in ed "Operation Hand Lift" in an this locality for his progressive effort to give help to the flooded farming methods and former act- counties in western Iowa, and ev-ive participation in agricultural ery man, woman and child is be-circles. It will be remembered ing asked to do his share. Money that he was among the first to is badly needed and you can endorse contour farming. For make your donation here to Mer-many years he served on the val Moulton. Or if you have any-Board of Directors of the Farm thing that will sell, it will be Bureau as well as the Farmers gladly accepted. Take part in Exchange. Also Mr. Daniels ser- "Operation Hand Lift" and help ved his community on the Wash- a needy neighbor. Read the adv ington Township School Board.    elsewhere. The following, Rainbow Girls attended the Friendship meeting held in Centerville, Tuesday even ing: Doris Jay, Coleen Hutchison, Jean and Joan Singley, Suela Eby, Jill Stansberry, Barbara Moulton, Mary Jan;; Howard, Kay Howell, Romona Howard, Sandra Stevenson. Accompanying the group were Mrs. Don New-land, Mrs. Paul Howell, Mrs. Don Wright and Mrs. Dick Eby, Guest officers from the local Assembly were Mary Jane Howard and Jill Stansberry. July 8 is a date always observed by members of the Rainbow in commemoration of the birthday of the founder, Mr. Sexton. PROPERTIES SOLD Someone with a flair for potted plants visited the John Sales home the past week and as a result some of Mrs. Sales' prize plants are missing. The plants, a Boston fern, airplane plant in a hanging base basket, and others, had just been put on the Sales' front porch. They were in fancy containers. A reward is being offered for information leading to their return. PEACE PEDALERS . . . E. Biissell Stabler (front) and Harry HPurvis atari on a bicycle trip from II. N. headquarter! to Washington to protest nuclear testa. Mr. and Mrs. Alva Stubble-field, , Jack and Judy expect to leave tonight for a vacation, which! will include Chicago, New York City, and Niagara Falls. Judy Stubblefield entertained a number of friends at an out door party, at her home, Tuesday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Fry have been enjoying a few days vacation in southern Missquri and the Ozarks. . ; Mr. and Mrs, Jonverl Sales and family spent the July 4th week end with relatives in Broken Arrow and Bartlesville, Okla. Mr. and Mrs. James Culbert-son and family of Moline, 111., and Mrs. Gladys Anderson of Oska-loosa, spent the week end with Mrs. Grace Utterback. Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Kirby were and Mrs. Bert Kirby and family, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brinegar and family, Mr.' and Mrs. Don Kirby and Denny, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Kirby and children, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Replogle and son, Jan-ie Replogle enjoyed ice cream at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Davis and sons on July 4. Mrs. Jake Bland and spn, Roy Maring were in West Point, Iowa Sunday where they attended the wedding of the former's grandson Darrell Maring to Patricia Mer schman. ------1-   -------- Funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Eagle Funeral Home, by the Rev. Wallace Prow-ell of the Christian Church. Burial was at Oakland cemetery. Card Of Thanks We are deeply grateful to our friends and neighbors and to the Christfan Church for their kindness and sympathy during the illness and death of our husband and father. To Edwin Carlis, Claude Lee, H. E. Roberts and Glen A. Mc Cullough, the family extends special heartfelt gratitude for giving their blood during a critical stage in an effort to save and prolong his life, when none of his type was available at the Blood Bank. Vivian Daniels Marjorie Buchanan Pauline Baker. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Horn and Billie spent the 4th with her parents near Floris. . Mr. and Mrs. Claude Lee have purchased the James Kerwin property on East 2nd St. .Mr. and Mrs. Cam Hays closed a deal, Tuesday, that makes them the new owners of the W. A. Wegener home on East 7th Street. PHONE US THE NEWSi Mr. and Mrs. Robert Burns and Glenda spent the 4th with his parents, Mr. . and Mrs. Elmer Burns in Ottumwa. NEW SPORT . . . Xonl SaUer, right, Austrian Olympic Ski Champion, was cheated out of trying a new sport. The AUa-Romeo rao-ing car shown was wrecked during a preliminary teat run. 5   

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