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Maurice Times Newspaper Archive: December 23, 1916 - Page 2

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Publication: Maurice Times

Location: Maurice, Iowa

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   Maurice Times (Newspaper) - December 23, 1916, Maurice, Iowa                                PEACE TENDER MADE BY GER MANY IS TURNED DOWN BY BRITISH PREMIER REPARATION FIRST HE SAYS LloydGeorge Declares Note Presented by Washington Contained No Stipu lations for Chancellors Speech Western Newpaper Xcivs Service announcement In the house of commons by David Lloyd George the new prime minister that the first act of his administration was the rejection of the proposal of the central powers for a peace confer ence constituted one of the most scenes which the oldest parliamentary veterans have ever wit nessed The new premier declared that be fore the allies could give favorable consideration to such an invitation they must know that Germany was prepared to accede to the allies terms giving complete restitution full rep aration and effectual guarantees and that to enter a conference upon the invitation of Germany proclaim ing herself victorious without any knowledge of her proposals would be putting our heads into a noose with the end of the rope in Germanys hands Mr LloydGeorge asserted that at the moment Germany was penning the note assuring her convictions as to the rights of other nations she was draggingBelgians into slavery He announced that the note presented through Washington contained no pro posals of terms but was a paraphrase of Chancellor von BethniannHoliwegs speech aud that the allies had sepa rately concluded to reject it although they had informally exchanged views and would within a few days present a joint reply Mr Asquith the former premier seconded decision with even stronger words and almost at the same moment Earl Curzon was information the lords that the govern ment would enter no conference thai did not guarantee for Europe the free and independent existence of nations great and small The marquis of Crewe affirmed the approval of the members of the late government The day was a doubly important one for the commons because the new prem ier unfolded his program for wide reaching war measures and Mr As qnith closed the last chapter of his nine years of leadership with aniac countingof his war stewardship The principal feature of Mr Lloyd Oeorgss program is a measure for na tionalism matching Germanys latest scheme whereby every citizen will be liable lor enrollment to perform work for which the authorities think him best equipped JOHN P BECKER AND WIFE IDENTS OF SOUTHERN ILLI NOIS KILLED ON FARM HOME RRED BY ASSASSINS THE MAURICE TIMKS CONSCRIPTED AGAIN Pair Distrusted BanKs Since Failure at Pekin and Kept Money Hidden in Reported Missing Posses on Trail of Slayers Peoria 111 Dec P Beck er one of the wealthiest farmers of southern Illinois and his have been murdered on their 3000acre farm near Mason City Robbery was undoubtedly the mo tive The police know that the couple had just received rent money which has disappeared In addition a r large sum said to have been hoarded for years by the couple Las disap peared Bloodhounds Are on the trail of the murderer of murderers The Beckers lost heavily some years ago In a bank failure at Pekin and since thea it has been known to all their friends that they have distrusted banks and have beea hoarding their money on the farm The murderers set fire to the farm house for the supposed purpose of making the crime appear an accident But the trick failed for the fire went out and the bodies found marks of violence Hundreds of farmers and many sheriffs deputies from the country side have formed posses and are searching in all directions GAS EXPLOSION KILLS TWO One Hundred and Fifty Men En tombed by Blast Braceville men are dead and fifteen injured as the result of a gas explosion in the Oliphant John son mine near here One hundred and fifty men were entombed by the blast but aid crews from nearby mines gave early assistance and the workings were cleared inabout four hours William Bailey and Thomas Patter son both of Bruceville were so badly injured they died a short time after being brought to the surface Pul moters revived more than fifty who had beea overcome hy gas The in jured are expected to recover State orficers are investigating the cause of the explosion TEUTON PRISONERS IN U S TwentyFive Arrive in Sah Francisco From Orient After Suffering Ver itable Hell on Earth San Francisco Dec the American steamship China 27 cTnys1 out of Hongkong dropped anchor Meiggs wharf before daylight it hud on board 25 Germans and Austrians who had been through what they de scribe as a veritable hell qn They are the Teutonic merchants of the Orient who were taken from the China last March and held in cells and in prison camps under Britishofficers as prisoners of war until their release was brought about by the American government The leader of the party p Schuedter president or CaWvitz Co the peat German trading firm of the Orient told the story of their horrors as he leaned over the rail of the ship Two members of the party are in sane as a result of hardships The following message to the Amer ican people was given by Schuedter We are deeply grateful to the American people for orr release from this hell onearth IOWA STATE NEWS Late Throughout the Common weal tli PARIS REPORTS CAPTURE OF 7 500 GERMAN SOLDIERS Gen Nivelle Deivers frrst Stroke Against Kaisers Forces Since His Appointment London Dec Nivelle Frances man of action has delivered his first stroke against the central powers since Ills appointment to su preme command Dispatches from the Paris war office on Friday report an energetic offensive on the Verdun front with impressive results Berlin admits that in the new offensive the French have gained advantageon both sides of he River Meuse 1 Paris Dec IS via troops in an advance north of Bouau mont and between the Meuse and Woevre rivers captured more than 7 500 prisoners and several heavy guns according to the French official com munication issued here on Friday Berlin Dec 18 by attacks delivered cm the east bank of the Meuse in the Verdun region result ed in a gala of ground for them toward Louvremont and war office announced on Friday in a supple j montary statement The engagement has not yet been concluded ROUMANIAN ARMY IS K PERIL Teutons Pursue Fees in Dobrudja Mackensens Troops Capture 1150 of Foe Joffre Gives Up Command Joffre has handed over the command of the French armies of Lhe north and northeast to General Robert George Nivelle recently ap pointed commander in chief of armies IE a brief speech Genera Joffre congratulated General Nivelle upon his appointment TLe principal of Seers of the grand headquarters staff who will remain at their posts until General Nivslle forms his awn staff likewise offered their General Nivelle replied expressing admiration for the high military qual ities of the victor of the Marnewhose selection as president of allied council he alluded to as a merited promotion Opinion Revssea Helena MontConviction m the trial court the and Cable conipanv on a charge of vie oi the statute forbidding trans imssion of information to ce Wa in poolroom betting on borse ww reversed bv the supreme court of Montana The suit was filed in rJtt by state authoritie Berlin Dec 19 via Driving eastward in Roumania ihe armies of Field Marshal von Macken sen have crossed the Bubean sector in force and taken enormous ciuantities of material In the Dobrudja the RussoKouma niaii retreat has progressed as far as the swamps and forests at the Danube mouth Reporting the fighting on this front the war office statement issued here on Sunday night says Army group of Field Marshal von Mackeuseu The Buzeu sector has been crossed on a broad front In addition to 1150 pris oners 10 locomotives about 400 rail road earsmostlyladen and innumer able vehicles fell into our hands In the Dobrudja the rapid pursuit of the enemy who only offered local resistance brought our allied troops close to the forest districts in the northern part of the eonatry U S WHEAT 639886000 BU Crop Report Shows Decrease in and Increase in on OtherGrains Washington Dec esti mates of this years production of the countrys principal farm an nounced by the department of agricul ture are Corn 2583241000 bushels compared with 2732457000 the 191014 aver age Wheat 639836000 bushelscom pared with 728225000 the fiveyear average Oats 1251992000 bushels com pared with 1157961000 the 191014 average Barley 180927000 against 186208 000 Rye 4338000 against 37568000 FHOF MUNSTERBERQ IS DEAD Harvard Psychology Expert Dies While Addressing FiftyThree Years Did Boston Dec Hugo Mun sterberg professor of psychology of Harvard college dropped dead on Sat urday while addressing a class at Rud cliffe Intense excitement prevailed aracns the girls in the classroom Pro fessor Mtmsterbers was fiftythree years old and hud seemingly been in perfect health up to tle moment of his death Death vps believed due to heart disease Professor Muusterherg had been working night ami day since the war criticisms hi maga zine articles made against him and had been laboring under if tense nerv ous si rain Canadian Craft Believed Lost at Arrivesat Northern Port Under Own Power Halifax N S Dec Cana dian torpedo boat Grilse formerly the American yacht Winchester which was believed to have been lost with all hands off the coast in the storm Tues day night came into the harbor at Shelburne 160 miles southeast of here under its own power Six members of its crew perished in the storm and a number of others were injured Tbe remainder including all the officers were reported safe TWENTYSIX SAILORS RESCUED FROM THE H3 Submarine Goes Aground Near Hum boldt Bay Face Death bySuffocation Eureka Gal Dec of the crew of the submarine HSj which had been pounding in the surf north of here since Thurs day with 26 men imprisoned in it were brought ashore on a breeches buoy A short time after the remain ing 21 including the two officers were rescued by the same means In a dense fog the H3 struck a sand pit 300 yards off shore just out side the entrance to Humboldt bay while cruising down the coast from Puget sound on its way to the Mare island navy yard in San Francisco bay It was accompanied by the U S S Cheyenne and the submarines Hl and E2 Officers of the Cheyenne said they believed that the accident was caused by the engines of the H3 becoming disabled A line was finally made fast to the H3 when one of the crew crept out on deck snatching the line as it fell across the bow GREECE GRANTS ALL DEMANDS Athens DispatchSays Constantine Will Withdraw Troops From London Dec Greek govern ment has accepted the utlimatiim pre sented by the entente allies says a dispatch from Athens to the Central News agency Athens via Dec demands of the entente allies present ed to the Greek government were in the nature ofan ultimatum All Greek are to be withdrawn from Thes saly according tov the demands and only a certain number of soldiers are to be concentrated in Peloponnesus The demandsfor reparation for the events of December T and 2 when fight ing took place between entente landing forces and Greek troops are to be for mulated later Official Statement Says 4000 More Prisoners Have Been Taken in Roumania i SYLVIA PANKHURST S FINED Peace Demonstration Riot in London Has a Sequel in Police Court Berlin Dec Marshal von Mackensens army has captured the great railway center of Buzeu in northeastern Roumania the German war office announced on Friday Buzeu lies about sixty miles northeast of Bucharest and is considered one of the main gateways to the Roumanian prov ince of Moldavia Three railroads converge there The capture of 4000 additional Kus soRournanian prisoners by the Ninth army is reported in the official state ment 8ester Votes Wet to r the license salcor cfrr r T campaign on he quor question that the city has had in years The vote m Javor of license was f3459 against Last year the votr for license was and 31377 Rev YaHuun A Sunday who if coiii evaoflreitatic k prosatoeat part ir the He Mother and Chfld Burn iiicli or bodU London Dec outcome of the penco demonstration at the East In dia dock gates by Sylvia Pankhurst tiie militant suffragette and a num ber of her sympathizers vrtjs the im position upon Pankhurst of n sentorce of 40 shillincrs line SENATE HONORS SAULS8URY i Delaware Man is Ejected President Pro Tern of the Upper Branch of Congress j VTnshsngton Dec Wil I lard Saulsbury Dem of Delaware was elected president pro tempore of The senate on Thursday receiving 41 votes i to 22 for Senator Gailinger Rep and j 5 for Senator Clapp of Minnesota C E Otis Marries Actress cv Hiiven oun V i York id rho Miss KmHy ta Oin in inort to the KM i xi v 1 Curbs Coal Exports aA j Honolulu Dec re 01 i by cable on Satunjrty from Aiisim Ms state tliat the in JDU of outgoing cargoes farther scat tu l Japs to Keep Land Seized 1 Tokyo Dec prvice j priposuls v delivered to rho Jrp i ajHSo the tho decaro that Jfirui to iler Kiao J AMiea Losses SIOOOOa Boriiii h wireloss ro Snyvle N nf ht French to dcte hnvc iSOO 000 nod of the ar nuthority Adoption of a law by the Iowa leg islature providing for the grading Iowa fruit potatoes and other prod ucts was recommended by Wesley Greene in his report as secretary to the Iowa Horticultural society which held its fiftyiirst annual convention at the state house in Des Moines He urged the Iowa fruit growers to get behind the movement so that in the future any fruit bearing the Iowa will stand high in the market and sell for better prices The sec retary reported the fruit of 1918 as follows Summer apples 32 per cent of a full crop fall apples 38 per cent winter apples 40 per cent pears IS per cent plums 87 percent cher ries 35 per cent peaches less than 5 percent grapes 52 per cent rasp berries 72 per cent blackberries 77 per cent currants 62 per cent goose berries 69per cent strawberries S4 per cent Every city of population in Iowa should have stor age houses for the care of Vegetables and fruits until the consumer is ready for the pmduce Mr Greene said Proper storage facilitieswillsave tha fruitgrowers thousands of dollars ery year he added L Senora Pedro Pages and Carlos M Buggan probably the most prominent stockmen of South America and C Lis Klatt secretary to Senor Pages were recent visitors at Iowa State College in Ames These three men came to Iowa from Chicago where they have been attending the Inter national Livestock exposition Senor Pages who produced the1 Shorthorn that won the graml cham pion ship honors at the livestock show held by the Rural S p ciety of Argentina was a Judge of Shorthorns at Chicago Se nor Duggan judged the grade and crossbred classes of fat steers at the international These men are among the leading stockmen of Argentina Senor Pages is a leader in political affairs and brings with him a com mission from the government of Ar gentine to inspect the schools in the United States Their trip to the Unit ed States and to Iowa comes as the result of a trip made by DeanC p Curtissof Ames to the livestock show in Argentina last summer Charles Clark has been employed or several months in an Omaha res taurant xHis parents live at Osh koshWis and his mother has been anxious that he come home His fa ther is traveling in thesouth Young Clark started home and to save mon ey he undertook to ride on the blind of a Rock Jsland passenger train Numbed by cold the train striking a sharp curve threw him off There he lay until morning when the crew of a passing train picked him up and1 took him to Atlantic where he was placed in a hospital feet and hands are frozen and will have to be amputated Private Ahbott of West Branch member of D troop Mrst Iowa caval ry was killed on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande where he was on guard duty at East Donna during the closing of the saloons of that place East Donna is a Mexican town near the border National guard officers and peace Authorities started an in vestigation to ascertain the facts and to attempt to locate the responsible parties connected with the killing Abbott is the first Iowa guardsman to meet death vrhile on duty on the Mexican side of the river The total amount of improvements in Atlantic since January 1 1913 has been over in public semi public as d private work Over KMV has been spent for thirty new concrete road half a mile outside the city limits as built by popular subscription to the amount of Twentyone blocks of street paving and eight DlocKs of alley paving wers added at a cost of bringing the total amount of paving up to twentythree miles Crippled children at the state uni versity hospital in Iowa City under the Perkins law are going to school Three teachers are instructing them in the work of every grade from the kindergarten to the high school The opening of ttte school was delayed for many weeks because of lack of text books and supplies The school rooms are on the seventh floor of the new hospital wing N H Pratt of Waukon must be reckoned as an old timer He caine to Iowa from Maine sixtysix years ago this month and has since been a continuous resident of Iowa with the exception of tae time he spent as a soldier during thecivil war Although in his eightythird year he works ev ery day aj his trade as cabinetmaker He says he would sooner svear out than rust out William Roy Matt a former Deco rah ccy and at preseat research engi neer riih the National Carbon com pany at Cleveland C is credited with having iavented a new arc fight It is said its rays can not be d is tin swish ed from daylight and close up the lipst is more intense thin bnliiaiu sunlight Fire caused a loss arccurUirt to CnX at lAncsfcOTo The in the electric plant owaed Tsy J R to With the braading and shipment of fiftyfour head of horses the final as signment of horses on the French war departments order for cannon ladder with Jo tfugent Des Moines horse buyer was made The Des Moines firm has furnished the French govern ment with about horses within the last sixteen months last shipment on theorder placed by the British government was also approved and started eastward to the coast This shipment consisted of 142 horses which makes a total of about 210CO that government has secured from Des Moines Between and were spent by these two allied nations f or horses in this state alone The market in Des koines has risen from a mere trading station to the second largest horse market in the second largest horse market in the United States said Mr Nugent John M Phipps who would have been 105 on next Valentine day south west Iowas oldest citizen died recent ly in Shenandoah at the noire of his son Albert S Phipps He was not confinedto his bed and was able to be out of doors tBe day before his death His twin brother Eli Phipps of Hennessey Okla died a few months short of the century mark The twins were too eld to serve in the civil War Mr Phipps was the father of ten children but only four survive M M Phipps of Pawnee City Okla Mrs J E Winfrey of Stella Neb Mrs Matina Gardner Leon Iowa and Albert at whose home he died He came from Independence Mo to Iowa in 1836 day he was 100 years old Mr Phipps was in itiated Inty the Elks lodge at Shen r V Iowa needs a clearing house of in formation for stock raisers and feed ers to help eliminate the multiple of cattle from the farm to the market back to the iarni again and finally back to the packing hous es Governor elect Harding said in an address hefore a meeting of the Iowa State grange at Des MciPes Calves are shipped by the breeders to Chicago where they are bought oft en by the neighbors of the shippers to be sent back to Iowa for he declared Then they are shipped again to Chicago to the packing hous es and arefinally shipped hack again to Iowa as meat or the finished prod uct The team from the Iowa state col lege won the first judging contest at the statehorticultural show in Des Moines with a total score of 43249 out of a possible 500 points This is the second year that Ames has won the loving cup and i they can win another year it will remain in their possession permanently The mem bers of the Ames team are L s Goode of Ames E S Stiilwell of Alabama Harold Cree Des Moines L Lr Dreibelbis of Ames W M Cain of Texas Iowas staple crops this year were valued at or more than in 1915 although the av erage and totalyields were notas great as in some of the previous years The value of nearly 000 while not taking into considera tion livestock poultry or dairy prod ucts exceeds of any year in the history of the state A marked de ficiency of moisture in June July and August caused the decreased average yields but high prices more than made np for ihis Creation of a state building inspec tor is demanded by the state commit tee of the Carpenters union of the Iowa State Federation of Labor at a recent meeting held in Des Moines Under present laws cities regulate their own buildings Their codes va ry in many instances Accidents to workmen have resulted in many stances where no inspection was in force CT L Beck of Cedar Rapids president of the committee stated that a state building inspector would be asked for in the bill The next general assembly will not be asked by the electric gas street or mtemrban railways to pass any bill creating a public utility commission according to John A Reed general at torney of the Iowa Railway and Light company and the Iowa Electric com pany The majority of the electric gas street and interurban railway companies are chartered by the stste of Iowa and are subject to its laws Mr Reed said and are satisfied to operate under the statutes as they now stand More than 12OCH lowans will this year get a Tears gift from Un cle Sam The that numbers have been payingevery six months as dealers in tobacco they can put down in their pockets the tax having been repealed effective the last day of the year It wont be necessary after that date to have a government license for the sale of tobacco and cigars The taxes on commission mer chants and commercial brokers have also been repealed William M Clark of Marshall town was sent to prison for two and one half years by Judge Martin J TVade His crime was that he took the sol emn oath of a witness to ten the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth and then went before the federal grand Jury and falsified to help a friend Fire bcFsved to have originated in a chimney completely destroyed the general store operated by Ed Woods a barber shop and the I O O F hall at Plcssantvile The loss will rearh Efforts of citizens wUh buck ets of water failed to extinguish the Mrs Carolina Wright who was the frst child lorn In what is now Scott county died the home 01 her daughter L J Kits in Des Motaee Mrs Wright vu bom ia a YMOB attr OB May raiNteat of   

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