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   Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 13, 1966, Mason City, Iowa                                The newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors HOME EDITION 10c a One MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JANUARY 13 Associated Preu Full LCIM VOL 105 No 217 War need not block progress of domes tic Johnson We will take apart domestic money pro Everett Dirksen Johnson ataglance WASHINGTON HP Here are the major points covered by President Johnson day night in his State of the Union address Domestic Pledged continuation and ex pansion of Great Society programs including antipoverty program rebuilding cities and non i discrimination in jury selection and sale and rental of housing Budget Outlined fiscal 1967 budget with billion expenditures billion rev enues billion deficit Urged restorati6n of telephone and auto excise tax cuts but no gen era tax increase Said he would not hesitate to ask for additional appropriations and taxes if the necessities of Viet Nam require it Viet Nam war Pledged United States would stay in Viet Nam until aggression ends said time is no longer on side of Communists h Peace efforts Said United States seeks selfdetermination for South Vietnamese strives to limit conflict places no limits onsearchfor peace but has received no response yet from Communists Reaction Democrats generally praised speech although some opposition was evident to tax proposals Republican leaders said speech avoided specific solutions to problems LBJ outlines big work load By JACK BELL WASHINGTON AP Presi dent Johnson has outlined a massive work load for the new Congress under a record 1128 billion budget and has assured Capitol Hill that US fighting men will stay in Viet Nam as long as Communist aggression continues Democrats and Republicans alike applauded the determine tion he expressed Wednesday night in his State of the Union message to press for peace al though we have received no response to prove either success or failure on the current American peace offensive While Democrats applaudee his declaration that he would not permit the war to sidetrack his Great Society programs Republicans attacked many o his domestic program proposals and his assertion that the bud get deficit for the next fisca year would be held to bil lion On the domestic front the Presidents sweeping proposal ranged from plans to comba crime in the streets to establish menl of a Cabinetlevel depart ment of transportation HI asked for laws to guarante equality for Negroes in th courts and in housing and a con stitutional amendment whic wuld extend the twoyea terms of House membprsto fou years He asked for money to pus ahead on the health and educa tion programs enacted last yea and to expand the antipovert rogram He called for the com ete rebuilding of entire centr nd slum areas of several citie nd an attack on the polluting o ic nations rivers He said h ould propose legislation aime cutting down on traffi aughter On the foreign front he asked or a new and daring direction o our foreign aid program North Iowa Weather outlook Clear and colder night to 5 above Fair and warmer FrWay in upper Weather on Pagt 2 We will stay in Viet Nam until aggres sion Johnson There were too many generalities on We have received no response on peace Viet Nam Everett Dirksen Johnson Transit strike ended More stories on longress Page n i ith help to nations trying to ontrol population growth He aid he wanted expanded trade vith the Soviet Union and Easl rn Europe On pocketbook issues he sked that the newly lifted ex ise taxes be slappec back onto ars and phone calls He also iskcd bigger withholdings from laychecks and a speedup in lorporate tax collections The alter two steps would not mean ncreases in tax rates But the President said he would not hesitate to ask Con LBJ Please turn to Page 2 Worth farmer honored Pork award goes to Nash By CHARLES W WALK North Iowa News Director ST ANSGAR Last March 1 Gerald Nash moved from a farm west of Manly toanother farm in the norlheasl corner ofWorthCounty Besides the normal household and farm items Gerald and his wife Josephine had to move there also were 24 gilts which fiad to be loaded up and hauled to their new home The gilts were due to farrow later in March and early April I was a little concerned about how the stress of moving might affect the gilts Gerald recalls but I guess everything worked out pretty well That is an understatement On the basis of the records com piled by the litters of those 24 gilts Gerald was named one of the states Master Pork Pro ducers for 1965 Thursday at the Iowa Pork Industry Conference in DCS Moines Gerald 35 is the fourth Worth County farmer to receive this coveted award in the last three years In 1963 Calvin Brown irafton was honored and in 1964 the award went to Alan itevens and Cecil Jones both of North wood The record achieved by those 24 gilts was outstanding Their itters averaged nearly 11 oi which 10 were weaned and mar eled The gilts were Hamp shire Duroc crossbreds and vcre bred to a Poland China aoar which was a litlermate of Ihe Hog College boar at Ihe 1964 Nalional Barrow Show In order lo be eligible for Ihe GERALD NASH Hampton jet pilot is killed HAMPTON Maj Dean L VIethfessel 36 son of Mr and Vtrs Floyd H Methfessel rural Hampton was killed Wednesday two supersonic T38 jet Master Pork Producers award Gerald had to keep complete records of all the pigs in those 24 litters including carcass data on at least 20 of them That car cass data bears out the fac that this was an outstanding set of hogs All 21 of the carcass hogs graded number oneThey hac an average backfat of inches and an averrge lengtl FOCUS Please Turn to Page 2 in a i near rainers collided handler Ariz Maj Methfessel with a stu dent was flying on instruments The second plane also with a student and instructor pilot aboard struck the first plane in he rear The other three occu 3ants parachuted to safety It s not known whether Maj VIethfessel was killed instantly or rode the plane down M a j Methfessel attended Hampton High School two years and was graduated from Wheat on Academy in Wheaton 111 He enlisted in the Air Force L950 He served some time in Libya Africa and in Korea where he flew 53 missions He had been at Williams AFB Chandler the last three years and was made a major last month Surviving are his wife two daughters Diane a month old Debby 6 and a son Dean 11 all of Chandler his parents two sisters M r s Thomas Buis Hampton and Mary Lynn Rat cliff LaFollette Tenn Funeral services will be held Friday in Chandler Burial will be made in a national ceme tery PHILANTHROPIST DIES PHILADELPHIA AP Mrs Widener Dixon 74 nation ally known philanthropist dice Wednesday Russians hike aid to Hanoi To help beat US forces TOKYO Moscow radio declared Thursday t h e Soviet Union will exert full effort to ship modern weapons to North Viet Nam to help defeat U S forces The broadcast was an analysi of the trip of Alexander N Shetepin No 2 man in the Kremlin to Hanoi the Nortl Vietnamese capital Shelepin ar rived in Peking from Hano Thursday for talks with the Red Chinese who have been critical of Soviet military aid to North Viet Nam All available aid will be ex tended lo North Viel Nam lo de feat Ihe US aggressions said Moscows Japanese language broadcast monitored in Tokyo Shelepins 24hour stopover came on the heels of President Johnsons Slate of the Union message in which he pledged anew to defend South Viet Nam rom aggression bul made new overtures for peace A correspondent of the Japa nese Kyodo news service report ed from Peking that Chinese Communist observers there srushed aside Johnsons peace offers and attached significance only to his determination to fight on in Viet Nam Official Soviet reaction to the Presidents speech was slow in coming Tass the Sovi et news agency told of the speech in a dispatch from Washington which said in part Johnson said he couldnt foresee how long the Viet Nam war will go on and that ifmight well be a protracted and tough war or protracted and tough talks or both On the one hand the President expressed the hope that he will be able to end the Viet Nam war and on the other hand he left no doubt as to the United States inten tion to carry on the war for months or even years Although Western officials hoped Shelepin during his visi to North Viet Nam urged Presi dent Ho Chi Minhs regime to join peace negotiations with the United States the Soviet en voys farewell remarks relayec by Tass gave no indication tha he did AP Photofax UP COMES A RED infantryman keeps rifle trained on a shirtless Viet Cong guerrilla as the Communist emerges from tunnel entrance in area of Trung Lap about 25 miles west of Saigon Thursday Infantryman is a member of the 1st Battalion 16th Infantry participating in the week long Operation Crimp Lo flush out Viet Congin the area Consider Viet holiday truce SAIGON South Viet Nam AP A large guerrilla force ambushed and badly mauled a South Vietnamese battalion and its American advisers at day broak Thursday within artillery range of the big USAustralian Operation Crimp The ambush came as the South Vietnamese government prepared to join the Viet Cong in a truce for the Vietnamese lunar New Year celebration next week The official news agency Viet Nam Press said South Vietnamese troops would stop fighting for three days in observance of Tet the national holiday which falls on Jan 20 23 A U S spokesman said the American command will con May take up tax measures next week WASHINGTON AP House action may start next week on President Johnsons request to have newly lifted excise taxes slapped back onto cars and phone calls He also wants pay check withholdings increased The bigger withholdings would not mean an increase in lax rates the wage earner would just pay more as he went along and have less to pay at the end of the year The same would apply to a speedup in corporate tax collections asked by the President Wednesday night in his State of the Union message Johnson said his revenue pro posals would help finance the Viet Nam war and domestic programs He predicted his pro posals would ultimately bring in more than billion annually Johnson proposed no general tax increase but said he would make further requests later if the Viet Nam war forced an in crease in revenue needs Sources close to the House Ways and Means Committee where all tax legislation must originate said it probably will begin hearings about next Wednesday Members were reluctant to comment on the chances for Johnsons proposals But one Rep A Sidney Hcrlong Jr D Fla told reporters Hell gel the tax increases Theres no doubt about it Of course there will be opposition Opposition was quickly heard A check of the Senate Finance Committee showed a probable majority inclined at least for the present against the propos als Some members said that if taxes must be raised it would be better to hike the rates on tobacco and alcoholic bever ages or to rescind the special credit given companies which invest in a modernized plant Republicans have iong been demanding that Johnson pare domestic programs before seek ing any tax increase Echoing such sentiments Thursday Rep Thomas B Curtis R Mo a member of the Ways and Means Committee predicted a fight on the excise lax proposals orm to the posture of th South Vietnamese govern menl II was thought lha American officials might urge Premier Nguyen Cao Ky to ex end the three day ceasefire a east to the four days pro claimed by the Communists tw weeks ago In honor of the lunar Nev Year the Foreign Ministry an nounced it will release 20 cap lured Norlh Vietnamese soi diers It also said the govern ment has agreed to allow in spection of ils prisoner of wa camps by the Inlernalional Re ross a move urged by th United Stales In Ihe war about 500 guorri las ambushed a South Vietnam ese battalion of about the sam size clearing Main Route 1 be twcen Trang Bang and CuCh 18 miles northwest of Saigon Government troops took mo erate casualties but there was heavy toll among Ihe America advisers with them a spokes man said Not far away more than US and Australian Iroops i Operalion Crimp engaged th Communists in several sma but intense fights that raised th reported toll in the sixday pus to 131 Communists killed captured and a mountain of sup plies uncovered The largest US campaign the war began last Saturday o the rim of the Iron Triangle a old Communist stronghold 2 miles northwest of Saigon New Yorks loss Millions NEW YORKUP This citys first subway and us strike a multimilliondollar transportation paraly is ended shortly before dawn Thursday By noon earnormal service was restored The Transit Authority announced that five hours f ter the settlement trains were operating on all lines f the subway system and buses were maintaining chedules normal for this time of day Cars continued to clog city streets however the result of the morning rush of 35 million New Yorkers to their jobs The traffic crush associated with the strike built up even as the dispute was resolved 1 hour and 25 minutes into its Governor raps drink teaching DES MOINES AP Gov larold Hughes a reformed al coholic squared off Thursday against a psychiatrisl who pro osed that children be taught low to drink alcoholic beverag es in school Dr Morris Chafetz assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Harvard University made he proposal at a conference on Alcohol and Food in Health and Msease sponsored by the New York Academy of Sciences I think this psychiatrist ought o have a good psychiatrist to consult with himself Hughes said I disagree 1000 per cent There is great danger in volved in the use of alcohol hildren ought to be taught that rather than to use it He said schools should include nslruction in Ihe effecls of al cohol I donl know of anything good t will do that cant be done bet er with something else Ihe overnor said He said drinking brings utter poverty high divorce rates des ecration and abandoned chil dren In my opinion Ihe great est poverty creator in America today is alcohol Hughes also criticized the pic uring of alcoholic consumption in movies and on television with implied approval He said movies and television often show a smiling person who walks into a room and pours rimself a drink with obvious pleasure If you think Ihis has no ef fecl you are wrong Hughes said He added thai he realizes liquor is here to slay bul said everyone should know its dan ers Inside The Globe Editorials 4 Society news S67 Sports MO CubGazette Latest markets 12 Mason City news 1203 Clear Lake news 15 North news 14 LEADER DIES LONDON AP SirBrace well Smith 81 business leader lordmayor in 1946 a baronet andhost lo the royal family died Wednesday 13th day Before Hie Transit Authority set the noon hour for resump tion of full service of its 6500 subway car and 4000bus sys tem Mayor John V Lindsay had said he did not expect it before late tonight or early Friday The striking AFLCIO he Transport Workers Union and the Amalgamated Transit Union agreed to mediators iettlement terms shortly before am By 8 am the first segment of the 237milelong subway sys em was carrying its first pay ng passenger since New Years Day A halfhour later the Tran it Authority announced that 3 200 buses were in operation Although describing it as fruitless to get into the num bers game Lindsay evaluated ihenew twoyear labor contract for 34400 workers at mil lion But a TWU lawyer said it is for to the penny The workers went back to their iobs pending union ratification of the contract In late morning Supreme Court Justice Abraham N Gell er signed an order freeing ail ing union chief Michael J Quill and eight other labor leaders from jail sentences he imposed for contempt At the same time ie dismissed a proceeding which sought un ion fines for ignoring an injunc tion forbidding the strike The Transit Authority request ed Gellers actions Quill who collapsed two hours after being jailed has been in Bellevue Hospital His col leagues were in civil jail The union negotiators were smiling broadly andlaughing as they came out to announce the executive boards decision at am I would like to announce the end of the strike were the first words of Douglas L MacMahon acting head of the unionl We are asking all ourmem bers to return to work immedi ately on their respective shifts and roll the subways and buses MacMahon said We are happy at the result we feel we have achieved a large measure of justice in our demands We are very very TRANSIT Please turn to Page 2 SAME   

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