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   Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 12, 1965, Mason City, Iowa                                Ike had a attack Diagnosed after tests FT GORDON Ga AP Former President Dwight D Eisenhowers illness was diag nosed Friday as a true heart at tack Revising their first estimate that the 75yearold fivestar general had suffered only a heart insufficiency the medical team issued a new report on the basis of late tests Eisenhower vacationing at his cottage on the Augusta Na tional Golf Club course suffered chest pains Monday night and was taken to the nearby Ft Gordon Army Hospital The finding was that he suf fered from a shortage of blood supply to heart muscles pro ducing angina pecloris or heart pain Friday Capt Wallace Hitch cock the forts information offi cer reported that further elec trocardiogram tests had re vealed Eisenhower suffered a genuine heart attack The statement said however that the onetime leader of the nation in war and peace had spent a restful night has had no further chest pains and was in excellent spirits this morn ing Eisenhower had one attack in the early hours Tuesday was reported on the road to recovery Svithin a couple of weeks then had another heavier longer episode of angina pectoris or heart pains Wednesday The doctors reported Thurs day they were treating him as if he had had an actual heart at tack he suffered one in 1955 The doctors said the two at tacks in less than 48 hours of angina pectoris were threat ening and that it was not un common for patients with heart disease to experience chest pains repeatedly which might or might not develop into a full blown heart attack On Wednesday before the second attack doctors had re ported that Eisenhower had been making a good recovery had not suffered a heart attack in the ordinary senseand would be transferring today from Ft Gordon Army Hospital to Wal ter Reed Army Hospital in Washington Eisenhower was returned to the oxygen tent Wednesday anc a special cardiac bed was wheeled into his roomTHursday to make him more comfortable Doctors kept up a constant vigil They reported Eisen howers general condition wa satisfactory and he had spent comfortable His brother Dr Milton S Ei senhower president of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore Md arrived Thurs day The general spent quite a bit of time visiting with him Mrs Eisenhower son John anc members of the staff Asked how the general looked to him Milton Eisenhower said Wonderful Ihope I look that good when Im 72 United Fund hits 896 of city goal The Mason City United Fund has reached in pledg es it was announced Thursday The figure represents 896 of the goal of It was announced also Thurs day that three more employe groups have gone over their quotas They are those at McGladrcy Hansen Dunn Gage accounting firm B O Rexall Drug and Sam Raizes Department Store The amount given so far rep resents 7374 individual pledges Plans are continuing for a residential drive to be held in the city next Tuesday 90 0 70 60 50 40 SAME The newspaper that mokes all North lowans neighbors HOME EDITION 10c a MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY NOVEMBER 12 IMS Associated IVesi Full lcasc Wires VOL 115 No 735 arms to Rhodesia WINCJS THAT WAS LEFT AFTER THIS JET BURST fNTOLAMES 2nd airline crash in week kills 39 persons SALT LAKE CITY AP A Boeing 727 jet airliner with 90 persons aboard burst into flames on landing at the city airport Thursday night burning 39 passengers to death in the fireswept fuselage Another 50 including the en tire crew of six dived through windows and emergency hatch es seconds before the fire ragfcd forward from the three jet en gines in the tail all the way to the flight deck Of the survivors 43 were hos pitalized The dead were in the blackened fuselage A spokesman for United Air Lines owner of the plane blamed the disaster on the col lapse of a nose wheel as the air craft touched down The three rearmounted en gines of the 727 arc fed by fuel lines leading back from tanks in the wings The flight originated in New York and reached Salt Lake City after stops in Cleveland Chicago and Denver Its sched uled destination was San Fran cisco The pilot Capt Gail C Kei mierer 48 of Denver was among the hospitalized survi vors Hospital officials said he kept repeating Terrible terri ble It was the third 727 involved in fatal accidents since August More pictures story on jet airliner crash in Utah Page 3 and the second this week The first plunged into Lake Michigan off Lake Forest 111 on Aug 16 killing all 30 aboard The second hit a hill while approaching Cin cinnati Monday night and 58 of the 62 persons aboard died The Civil Aeronautics Board in Washington dispatched 12 in vestigators to seek the cause of the crash A spokesman for the Federal Aviation Agency said in re sponse to question At this point we can see no relationship between the three accidents and we have no plans for grounding 727 jets A similar view was expressed by Pader Hogue chief flight safety engineer for Boeing I think its a fine airplane and recent unfortunate experiences arc in my opinion unrelated he declared The survival of the pilot and other crew members provided an opportunity for investigators io obtain firslhancl expert opin ion on the cause Mrs Lyndon R Day of Ar lirlgton Va a passenger who escaped said I heard a loud thud I knew we had made a crash landing There were flames on the out side of the plane on both sides I scrambled through a door on to a wing and dived to the ground Another passenger Ralph S Nesbitt of Santa Monica Calif told interviewers We had a hard bump start ed swerving from side lo side and flames broke out from the rear People were Ihrown all over the place It was horrible The heat was terrible Ncsbilt said he dived through an open window on to a wing and then dropped to safety through a sheet of flame The interior of the 72ton jet liner was burned charcoal black Dr Hilmon Castle a medical examiner for the Federal Avia tion Agency said he found bod ies strewn along the aisle some of them piled on lop of each other One of the passengers listed by the airline among the dead was Dill Linderman who had CRASH Please turn to Page 2 Reds launch Venus ship MOSCOW AP The Soviet Jnion launched an unmanned space station toward Venus Fri day and said it should reach the planet around the end of rebru ary It was the second announced Venus probe by the Russians and about 50 per cent heavier than Venus 1 which missed the planet by more than 100000 miles in February J961 Tass the official Soviet news agency which announced the aunch said Venus 2 is moving on a course close to the pre scribed one Tass Said that by noon the space probe was nearly 34800 miles from the earth and equip ment wasfunctioning normally US scientists said the Soviet spacecraft Zond 1 launched April 2 apparently was intend ed to be a Venus probe although the Russians never announced it as such The Americans said Zond 1 apparently missed its mark in July 1964 The US Mariner 2 passed Vemis Dec 14 962 at a dis tance of 21648 miles after gath ering data continuously during its 180Tnillionmile j o u r n e y During the 42 minutes it flew past the planet it collected data on the surface and atmospheric temperatures and cloud struc ture of Venus This was relayeo back to earth and Mariner spec on toward the sun said a multistage rocket launched Venus 2 The last stage was first put into a park ing orbit and then it launched the station toward Venus This is the method the Russians have used in their moon probes The weight of Venus 2 was given as 3 kilograms 2123 pounds Tass said power is be ing supplied it by chemical and solar batteries t Sunken barge of chlorine brought up BATON ROUGE La A sunken chlorine barge was pulled from the muddy bottom of the Mississippi River Friday ending a tense twomonth drama that began with Hurricane Bet sy The 60foot lift took just under two hours After a thorough check of the barge and its four tanks containing 602 tons of liq uid chlorine authorities issued j an allclear at am The state of emergency which existed in the greater Baton Rouge area is over said acting Gov Aycock in a statement It is safe now for the people to return to their homes The barge was raised by a giant floating derrick with twin booms 100 Cong killed in heavy fighting Photofnx WOUNDED IN ACTION An American sergeant of the 1st Infantry Division winces in pain as two Vietnamese soldiers drag him to an evacuation helicopter He was wounded by grenade shrapnels in both legs and chest Friday when a boobytrapped grenade exploded in front of him when he searched a house on an operation north of the new 1st Division headquarters at Phu Loi 17 miles north of Saigon Vietnamese served as in terpreters SAIGON South Viet Nam detachment of the US Armys 1st Infantry Division sought off a sharp Viet Cong as sault Friday in a daylong battle 40 miles north of Saigon A spokesman said 100 of the en emy were killed and the toll would go higher 1 American casualties were de scribed as light at dusk as fightj ing that raged for hours ta1 pered off into a sporadic exj change of small arms fire Striking with recoilless rifles and mortars a Viet Cong bat talion of 500 troops launched the attack against about 700 men of the divisions 3rd Bri gade Reports from the scene said the Americans came under fire without warning Planes and artillery helped turn back the guerrillas The troops were on an opera tion to secure Highway 13 on the edge of Zone D which has been under Communist control since the end of World War II In recent months B52 bombers from Guam have pounded the jungled zone and US troops have pressed major offensives in Ihe area in an effort to deny the Viet Cong a sanctuary from which lo operate US fighterbombers hit at the Vicl Cong without letup dur ing todays engagement Pilots flew more than 40 missions against the enemy during the height of the clash The Americans fired 105mm howitzers at the enemy at close range and US planes ham mered the Viet Cong The spokesman said several US armored personnel carriers were damaged The Viet Cong assault was the second Communist attack in five clays against a major US combat unit On Monday a bat talion from the 173rd Airborne Brigade fought he paratroop ers toughest battle of the war against a Viet Cong battalion in VIET NAM Please turn fro Page 2 Red agents lead American to death SAIGON South Viet Nam Two apparent Viet Cong agents who posed as his friend led a young American aid em ploye lo his death Friday in a Viet Cong ambush US offi cials said The victim was Peter Hunt ing 24 of Oklahoma City Okla He was shot through the head five times while driving in the Mekong delta south of Saigon a spokesman said Two Vietnamese who were with Hunting apparently unharmed and were believed to have joined the Vicl Cong Hunting was a regional super visor for the International Volun tary Service Huntings civilian vehicle was peppered with bullets Members of a military convoy lhat he had passed fivn minutes earlier said they found his bullet riddled body on the ground After shooting Hunting through the head the Viet Cong fired 10 more bullets into his bncly they said Hunting had departed with the two Vietnamese from the delta city of Vinh Long They were on their way to Can ThV 20 miles away and about 10 miles south of Saigon Earlier reports had said that he was killed when a mine ex ploded under the vehicle but this was erroneous the spokes man said The guerrillas opened fira on the convoy but quickly broke contact when the troops returned the fire Suggest backing British Warning in Parliament UNITED NATIONS NY AP The United States said Friday it had ordered a compre hensive embargo on all arms shipments to Rhodesia and tak en other steps to support Brit ains efforts to suppress the in dependence moved of Rhodesias white minority government US Ambassador Arthur J Goldberg made his announce ment at an urgent session of the UN Security Council where British Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart declared ear lier that Britain had ruled out the use of force to punish the government of Ian Smith Goldberg urged all countries to join in tough economic re strictions to back Britain He said the United States had closed its consulate in Salisbury and had decided to bar the im portation of sugar from Rhode sia in 1966 Other measures taken by the United States he said included suspension of action on applica tion for loans and credit from Rhodesia and warning of all po tential investors of the grave risk involved in Rhodesian in vestments Ghanas Foreign Minister Alex QuaisonSackey the first African speaker in the council was strongly critical of Britains reluctance to use force in sup pressing the rebellion We are not here to endorse halfhearted measures he said QuaisonSackey said the Afri canstates were prepared to give al possible assistance to Rho desias four million blacks in cluding force Stewart told the council that if British measures against the Smith government are to suc ceed they must have the good will of thet entire international community We do not believe that the use of military force can solve these problems he added I invite those who ask for mili tary force to look around the world today and see how many places violence and armed con flict rage His remarks were addressed obviously to African nations which have been pressing Brit ain to use military force to sub due the rebellion by Rhodesia against Britain The British government warned Prime Minister Ian Smith and his Rhocicsian regime Friday their defiance of British authority is treason The penal ty is death Atty Gen Sir Elwyn Jones issued the warning in the House of Commons as the government RHODESIA Mease Turn to Page 2 Inside The Globe Editorials 4 Comics 5 Latest markets 7 Mason City news47 Sports 910 TV section HJ2 Society news 13 Clear Lake news14 Classified pages 16lf North Iowa news 18 North Iowa Weather outlook Mostly cloudy and much colder Friday night with dim inishing winds lows in mid to upper 20s Deere a s i n g cloudiness Saturday morning and becoming fair in the afternoon colder highs in upper 30s Weather details Page 2 BULLETIN RICHMOND Va Flood Byrd senator newspaper executive and cr named Friday to succeed his famous father in the US Senate   

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