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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 10, 1965 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 10, 1965, Mason City, Iowa                                i TIE ASSOCIATED PKEM NEW YORK Hieres a rundown on the powei failure which gripped the Northeast for more than 10 hours THE EXTENT At its peak Tuesday night the power failure and companion blackout encompassed 80000 square miles and 30 million persons in New York Pennsylvania Massachusetts Maine New Connecticut Vermont Rhode Island and Toronto and Ottawa in Canada It hit about pm EST and New York City one of the last areas to have powar re stored was without lights until amWednesday ataglance THE CAUSE Unknown as yet although some experts attributed it to a breakdown at a remotecon trol substation near Syracuse NY Suggestions of sabotage generally were discounted President Johnson ordered Federal Power Commission Chairman Joseph C Swidler to launch an immediate investigation TRANSPORTATION Striking in the heart of the evening rush hour the blackout snarled traffic in the carclogged streets brought New Yorks subway system to a halt and stopped elevators between floors An estimated 850000 persons were stranded on the subways COMMUNICATIONS Civilian communication systems The Associated Press the radiotelevision networks were silenced but their direction was trans ferred to other centers primarily Washington The Pentagon reported that its bases switched instantly to emergency power and neither they nor the Washing tonMoscow hot line were hampered the incidence of crime increases after dark there were no reports of a major upsurge in the big cities But at the Massachusetts State Prison some 300 inmates kicked off a furniturebreaking riot which ended when guards and stale troopers herded them into one cell block The newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors HOME EDITION UOc a One MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 10 W5 Asstieialed Press Full Lease Wires Cope Coc ISMNO Pholofax WHERE THE POWER DIED The shaded area indicates parts of the north eastern United States and Canada hitby a massive power blackout last night Power went out at pm EST Tuesday and came back on at am EST Wednesday Some areas within the area were not af fected due to independent power sources Blackout BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK UP i Here is a chronology of powerfailure that blacked out riiost of the Northeastern United States and Toronto and Ottawa in Canada Tuesday night At pm the Niagara Power Authority in upstate New York reportedan un derfrequency somewhere in the overall North east distribution system r The underfrequency something like a xshort circuit resulted in a massive power urea short time later At during the rush hour lights went out in New York City and over most of New England and parts of New jersey and Pennsylvania President Johnson was informed immediately at his Texas ranch At about pmit was announced over a radio station operating on emergency power that power would be restored in the New York area momentarily that some upstate communi ties already had their power back At 8 pm President Johnson said power was expected to be restored in New York City by 10 pm At pm New York City Police Com missioner Vincent Broderick ordered his men to check how many people still were trapped in elevators At pm the NewYork City Transit Authority said 300000 people still were trapped in city subways but were being evacuated A few minutes later Mayor Robert F Wag ner after an emergency meeting with his staff said power would be restored about 11 pm At pm ConsolidatedEdison the com pany that supplies power to New York City said most of the city would be without power most of the night At am Wednesday power was re stored Asks probe of power failure WASHINGTON UP Sen Jack Miller R lowa called Wednesday for congressional com mittees to investigate the great power blackout in the Northeast Miller a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee said in a statement I am somewhat reassured by reports that our military establishment was able to meet the emergency through its independent power re sources in line with programs which I had un derstood had long teen established However I believe that the Armed Serv ices Committees of the Senate and House should receive a full report ori how this emergency was met by the various military agencies and other appropriate committees of Congress should most assuredly investigate the civilian aspects of this failure with a view to determining what federal action if any needs to be taken to prevent a re occurrence VOL 105 No 233 inal okay on 35 Yields of corn decline Rot hurts area crop By CHARLES W WALK North Iowa News Director North Iowa farmers arent getting everything they expected in the way of corn yields this fall Before they got in the fields many area farmers were pre dicting near record crops Since the picking got under way in earnest however most of these farmers have taken a look in the wagon box and reassessec their crops dosvnward The main reason for this down ward reassessment according to five area extension directors rot A fungus plant disease which attacks the corn stalksfrom the inside stalk rot hashit North Iowa with vengeance The ex tension personnel of the area be lieve it could corn yields being down 10 cjr 15 bushels an acre from what had beenexpected In Cerro County this could mean the difference be tween a good corn yield and a recordbuster SpencerWilliams the countys extension director says stalk rot has ticularly bad infields harvested early I was in one field where field losses ran betwjeen 20 and 25 bushels an acre Williams reports That kind of a loss would pay for the seed corn and fertilizer if it were in the cribs Despite this stalk rot loss Wil liams still believes the countys corn yield average will be be tween 70 and 75 bushels anacre up c o nsider ably over the 1964 county av erage Without the loss Wil liams says the crop would have been nearanew record Mitchell Countys Ed Do r o w also believes downed corn from stalk rot and root worm will cut sharply into that countys corn yield average With about 25 per cent of the corn picked Dorow believes the yield will average between 60 and 65 bushels an acre That isnt as good as the farmers had expected Dorow continues but its still a big improvement over last year In 1964 Mitchell Countys aver age corn yield was about 35 bushels an acre the lowest in the state The county was hard hit by a drought last year Dorow also reports that a lot of the Mitchell County corn har vested early has been light and This is due he be lieves to early dying of plants in September brought about by the weather wet days and cool Farmers also have been reluc tant to start picking corn in Mitchell County Dorow says because the moisture content is still quite high Most of the corn that has been picked to date ha been by farmers with drying Focus on North Iowa FOCUS Turn to 2 A beacon in the New York night Generatorpowered searchlights usually used to publicize film premieres and supermarket openings were put to good use in New Yorks Times Square area Tuesday night during the power Photnfax failureLighted structure is the new Allied Chemical building Empire State building is at left This view was made from West New York NJ across the Hudson River Inside The Globe MILITARY comm u n i c a tions kept going during blackout Page 9 POWER grid helped spread blackout Page 12 PROBE of Klu Klux Klan derailed Page 13 WAR claims70 GIs in first week of November Page 16 COMMUNICATIONS hub recovers from power fail ure Page 24 INMATES riot during blackout Page 25 PRINCESS Margaret io Arizona desert Page 40 Comics 6 North Iowa news 1011 Editorials 15 Society news 17181920 Sports 2122 Bowling 23 Clear Lake news 2728 Latest markets 30 Mason City news 3031 Classified pages 3839 i North Iowa Weather outlook Decreasing cloudiness and warmer Wednesday night lows 3035 Thursday partly cloudy and cooler 40 Weather details Page 2 NEW YORK AP Lights flashed on in New York early Wednesday and transportation systems began to move signal ing the end to a massive and frightening power blackout thai crippled the teeming North east After 10 hours of worried waiting the lights came back on at am EST in the heart of of the last areas still affected by the nations worst power failure New Yorks mammoth sub way system staggered back into operation and commuter train Northeast power out service was slowly restored The city remained crippled because hundreds of thousands of persons could not get to work Coming on with alarming sud denness during Tuesdays eve ning rush hour the blackout at its peak enveloped 80000 scjuare miles affecting up to 30 million in eight states scram bled transportation and commu nications and stranded hundreds of thousands in stalled subway cars and elevators Through the night the Texas White House reported progress of experts trying to pinpoint the trouble that drained electric power from New York Boston and hundreds of smaller cities towns and hamlets Reports were contradictory although President Johnson was advised Ihu experts were pret ty well agreed no sabotage was involved and the Pentagon said military communications and the WashingtonMoscow hot line were not hampered As the night wore on power began seeping back into most of Corridor by Lake adopted Decision is unanimous AMES Iowa High way Commission Wednesday nded a yearslong controversy y approving the Clear Lake ilason City route for Interstate 35 in northern Iowa The commission unanimously adopted the hearing held at Clear Lake Sept 30 This in fect gave final approval to the route between Clear Lake and Mason City in preference to a more westerly line paralleling US Highway 69 The commission said if its decision on the basis of low er road user costs along the Mason City Clear Lake route than along the Highway 69 cor ridor The US Bureau of Public Roads was reported to favor the Mason CityClear Lake route Carl engineer of plan ning said The commission had author zed the staff to hold the hear Please Turn to 2 Federal Well in 2 weeks Ike suffered attack FT GORDON Ga Former President Dwight D Ei senhowers doctors reported Wednesday he has had a mild at tack of angina pcctoris or cor onary insufficiency They said he might be well again in two weeks While the heart condition that put the fivestar general back in the hospital at age 75 was relat ed to a severe heart attack in 1955 the doctors said that this time it was not a heart attack in the same sense Later in the day the doctors said Eisenhower will be flown from here to Washington Friday to spend the two weeks of con valcsccnce at Walter Reed Army Hospital The two weeks date from about midnight Mon day whcn he entered the hospi tal here Eisenhower will fly to Wash ington on a military plane from Augusta Municipal Airport land at Andrews Air Force Base out side Washington and take a helicopter to Walter Reed He will be ambulatory dur ing the trip the Ft Gordon press information officer Capl Wallace Hitchcock told a news man Mrs Eisenhower will go to Washington by train leaving Augusta Friday afternoon The doctors emphasized that the current illness is not a heart attack as the term was applied in the 1955 case Their patient was removed from an oxygen tent this morn ing and told he could sit up dur ing the clay There has been no more chest pain or discomfort since the original attack that struck around midnight Monday way of putting what has happened to the former president the team of physi cians agreed is hardening of the arteries which shut off some of the blood from the heart the blackout area that at one time stretched over New York Pennsylvania Massachusetts Maine New Hampshire Con necticut Vermont Rhode Island and even struck Toronto and Ottawa in Canada Johnson however ordered the Federal Power Commission to launch a sweeping investiga tion and gave it all the facilities of the federal government including the FBI The blackout camewith a flickering of lights at about pm the peak of the rush hour in teeming cities Subway cars speeding an esti mated 850000 persons through New Yorks subway ground frightcningly to a halt Eleva tors stopped between floors bringing cries of dismay Oper ating rooms darkened News tickers fell silent Airliners scrambled to other ports Con victs in a Massachusetts prison rioted Immediately offduty police were cnllcd back to work Na tional Guardsmen were put on alert in case of looting Emer gency power was plugged in at hospitals One man told of being in an elevator in a Manhattan office building The lights sputtered out The three of us pressed the alarm button We waited and heard nothing A few minutes later the doors opened T can tell you we were glad to get out A commercial airline pilot POWER Please turn to Page 2 approval to follow By ROBERT H SPIEGEL AMES L M Clausen chief engineer of the Iowa State Highway Commission said Wed nesday that he expects final ap proval from the US Bureau of Public Roads on the Mason CityClear Lake route of Inter state 35 before the end of No vember The bureaus approval is re quired before work can pro ceed on the interstate highway Robert E Simpson district engineer for the bureau said the highway commissions reso lution of approval will bo han dled promptly and submitted at once to the Washington office for its approval Simpson agreed that the bureau decision should be forthcoming before the end of the month The bureau earlier had indicated its approval of the Mason City Clear Lake alignment of Interstate 35 Clausen said that a survey will begin just as fast as pos sible to pinpoint the alignment of Interstate 35 within the milewide cprridor that has re ceived commission approval This will be followed immedi ately by design work and then BUREAU Please turn to Page 2 SAME   

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