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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, May 12, 1965 - Page 1

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   Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 12, 1965, Mason City, Iowa                                Explains policy to NATO Rusk wants suggestions LONDON o State Dean Rusk explained US policy in Viet Nam and the Do minican Republic to the Atlan tic Alliance allies Wednesday and asked them to show how these delicate problems could be handled any better Rusk newly arrived from Washington went into a secre session of the North Atlantic treaty Organization conference hoping for understanding backing from the 15nation n n r a nce NATO foreign met for an hour and 15 minutes in a semisecret in which the substance of their re marks were relayed later to newsmen Then came a secre session limited to delegation heads and one with press offi cers and other delegation mem hers excluded Diplomatic sources said Rusk in his talks with the At J antic allies intended to stress the diplomatic complexities o the Viet Nam problem Rusk is expected to tell other members that the Viet Cong teems to be massing its forces presumably for the seasonal of fcnsive the Communists often launch with the coming of the monsoon season Because of the explosive sit in the Dominican Repub lic Rusk originally had planned to leave the London conference to Undersecretary of State George W Ball who deputized for him at Tuesdays opening session Then Rusk flew in from Washington overnight Informants velopments at the opening NATO session Tuesday prompt ed the change of plans One development was the un voiced over the Viet Nam and Dominican Republic situa lions Several foreign minister expressed uneasiness over these American policies Maurice DE position Couve de Murville of France said the Vietnamese war would lead to conflict with Communis China or the Soviet Union Another factor was a com plaint by British Prime Minister Harold Wilson that highpres sure sales campaigns by American arms manufacturers were shutting Britain out of the alliances arms market He warned that Britain might have In consider the effect on its re serves of hard currency This was taken as to cut British forces in West Ger many which are assigned to NATO unless the cost of then maintenance is eased by arm sale to West Germany The United States Britain and France formally reaffirmed that they share with the Soviet Union the responsibility for a final allGerman peace settle meat The decision had been announced Tuesday President Charles de Gaulles government had wanted the declaration to reflect Frances new line that it was mainly for Europeans to work out a solution of the German problem This would have excluded the Americans A sudden retreat by Couve de Murville Monday night opened the way to agreement to the relief of the whole Atlantic al liance Federal pay hike WASHINGTON AP dent Johnson asked Congress Wednesday to give pay in creases costing million a year to military personnel and federal whitecollar workers Johnson in a special mes sage proposed a three per cent acrosstheboard pay raise for ail civil service workers postal employes and members of the foreign service The only ones within the ex ecutive branch excluded from the proposed increase would be the lop policymaking officials and some 600000 bluecollar workers whose pay already is geared to prevailing wages in the communities where they are based Ior military personnel who htvfi had at least two years of service an average Increase of O per cent in total compensa tion base pay plus allowances fringe benefits was pro posed Enlisted men who have wrvcd less than two years would get an increase iverag ing 27 per cent The ntwspoper that makes oil North lowans neighbors Edition VOL 105 MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY MAY IJ 1WJ lfe Consiju el No tt Russ moon landing fails AGO more Yanks bolster force in Viet Nam SAIGON South Viet Nam AP Nearly 1000 US Army paratroopers and another com bat battalion of 1400 US Marines landed in South Viet Nam Wednesday The paratroopers are mem bers of the 173rd Airborne Bri gade who came by boat from Okinawa to join about 2000 members of the brigade already in Viet Nam A US spokesman said they would help defend American installations at the Bien Hoa air base 20 miles north ofSaigon The Marines landed at Chu Lai 52 miles southeast of the strategic USVietnamese ail base at Da Nang They boosted to 14000 the force of leather necks thrown into the war against the Communist Viet Cong The Marine landing lacked the usual fanfare of pretty girls with flowers and official wel coming parties A spokesman called it a routine adminis trative affair The new arrivals raised the total US military force in Viet Nam to about 46500 men The paratroopers included a a artillery battalion which its commander Lt Col Lee E Surut 40 of New York City said would be the Armys larg est single concentration of fire power in the country He said 3t is the first Army artillery sent to Viet Nam Other men of the brigade who arrived last week already have started some patrol activity in the vicinity of the Bien Hoa base but have not pushed out INJURED IN VIET CONG ATTACK namese policeman who was stabbed and beaten on the head by attacking Viet Cong awaits evacuation Song Be South Viei Nam after government troops recaptured Ihe city Protest march by churchmen WASHINGTON CAP A group of Protestant Roman and Jewish leaders capping a protest march by hundreds of demonstrators ap pealed to Secretary of Defense Robert S McNamara Wednes day for negotiation to end the fighting in Viet Nam We feel that the bombing is driving us further away from the negotiating table rather han bringing us closer to it Dr Edwin T Dahlberg former president of the National Coun cil of Churches told newsmen after a 75miniUe conference with McNamara Below third floor window hundreds of pick ets stood in what they called a silent vigil or paraded kvith signs urging negotiation and a halt in the fighting Leaders of the demonstration said about 600 clergymen thco ogians and others started the mile march from Mount fernon Methodist Church in Washington across the Potomac o the Pentagon Others joined they said and they estimated the number swelled to between 800 and 1000 by the time the marches reached the Pentagon The demonstrators ranged hemselves some distance from hree entrances on as many sides of the fivesided building Defense officials were un usually solicitious They opened doors normally sealed to permit he demonstrators access to Pentagon cafeterias and restau rants spoke for the eaders who were ushered into McNamaras office The secre ary did not speak to newsmen Dahlberg said McNamara gave them facts they could not divulge However Bishop Daniel Cor rigan director of the home de artment of the Episcopal Church New York said McNa mara didnt tell the group any more than ii already knew about Viet Nam The vigil was organized by a group calling itself the Interre ligious Committee on Viet Nam The spokesman said the group is concerned mainly about the human moral not the politi cal aspects of the war in Viet Nam He said the demonstration was organized for four pur poses which he put this way To express the sincere desire of the American people for a peaceful settlement in Viet Nam To express concern at esca lation of the war especially US bombing of North Viet Nam 2 labor issues in House Main bills of Hughes DES MOINES big push was on in tfie Iowa House Wednesday to get approval of Gov Harold Hughes main labor bills including one to allow un ion shops The House Industrial and Hu man Relations Committee got behind the drive Tuesday when it recommended two measures for passage would modify righttowork law to legalize un ion shop contracts requiring em ployes to join the union within 30 days after they are hired The other would create a State Mediation and Conciliation Com mission with power to help settle labor disputes in the hope of preventing strikes A third bill sought by Hughes remained in the House commit tee without any action on it It would provide that no restrain ing order issued fay a judge in a labor dispute could be effective for more than five days without a full hearing for both parties The Hughes proposals espe cialiy the modification of the righttowork law have been threatened with getting the cold shoulder in the Senate where the Democratic majority is thin governor used seldom used tactic last week when he urged a joint session of the House and Senate to pass the legislation He said that man agement has more to gain than labor from legislation retnoving the ban on union shop contracts After Hughes appearance be fore the lawmakers the effort to get the labor bills moving shift ed to the House where the Dem ocrats are in control 101 to 23 COHEN DIES into the countryside No contact with the Viet Cong has been re ported About 5000 Marines are now concentrated at Chu Lai US Seabees are to build an 8000 foot jet airstrip there for two Marine attack squadrons that will give added air muscle in central Viet Nam Before the landing one Marine on guard duty was wounded as the Viet Cong har assed the Marine positions No Communist activity was report ed during the landing To register hopes that the United State3 will continual ly press for a settlement through unconditional discus sions with all concerned parties To support and encourage President Johnson in a program of international cooperation for human welfare and economic development in Southeast Asia Dworok ousted as mayor of Omaha OMAHA A V Sorensen has captured the Omaha mayorship over the con troversial incumbent James Dworak A recod number ot Omahans turned out Tuesday to give Sorensen a 59525 to 35636 7nargin over the 39yearold mayor who is v under indictment for bribery North Iowa Weather outlook fair and warmer threufh Thursday Wml MMUy night in low Ms Highs Thursday 7743 The landing heightened specu lation that the entire 3rd Marine Division on Okinawa eventually would be committed to the fight against the Viet Cong The Chu Lai Marines now up to regimental strength are ex pected to begin ranging the countryside in search of Com munists The Marines at Da Nang who now total about 9000 men have been assigned more than 100 square miles of additional terri tory west of the air base to be cleared of Viet Cong Originally the Da Nang Marines were said to be assigned only defense po sitions around the air base Twelve US Air Force F105 fighterbombers supported by 12 other planes attacked targets along five highways 160 miles south of Hanoi and then hit the North Vietnamese port of Vinh A spokesman said buildings trenches and a number of oil tankers and other maritime traffic in the harbor of Vinh were hit then the Thunder chiefs on a second strike sank two 70foot junks a lord mayor of Liverpool was accompanies Rangers as hereturns to in Viet missing guerrillas was driven off His parents are Inside The Globe PLAN COURSE for train ing hospital attendants Page 9 Society news S78 North Iowa newsU Comici 17 Sports1920 Editorials 21 Clear Uake news 2425 Mason City news 2829 Latest markets 28 Classified pages 333435 Attempt to ayert newspaper strike SIOUX CITV AP Repre senatives of the Sioux City Jour nal Local 180 of the Interna tional Typographers Union met LONDON Gen vSir with Waller a federal Brunei Cohen 78 founder of the m e d l a l flom Omaha British Legion and prominent Wednesday in aa attempt to as a worker for wounded veterPrevent a strike by the union set ans died Monday Cohen son of for 4 Pni The union gave notice Monday badly wounded in World War I that it would strike unless and had both legs amputated agreement on a new contract above the knee was reached Rebel leader meets U S representative By ROBERT BERRELLEZ SANTO DOMINGO DominictZ can Republic AT Caamano however in an ad dress over the rebelheld Radio Francisco Caamano met a US representative for the first time since the Dominican rebels named him prdvisional presi dent then vowed Tuesday night he would not take a step back ward Caamano conferred at his headquarters with former Am bassador John Bartlow Martin President Johnsons special en voy The talk aroused specula tion that the rebel leader would meet soon with Brig Gen Anto nio Tmbert Barreras president the rival civilianmilitary junta Msgr Emanuele Clarizio pa pal nuncio to the Dominican Republic sat in on the talk be tween Caamano and Martin and said later he was highly opti mistic of a settlement of the 17dayold civil war o said I will not ickward in spite o the enormous US force He derided the junta as an inoperative force and charged anew that President Johnson sent 20000 soldiers and Marines to the Dominican Republic on emnpfAN EYE CATION Stationed at a mcnerv emplacement atop a roof overlooking the rebel territory in Santo Domingo two US Marines survey the beleagured city in the Dominican Republic capitol Deno vows not to take step backward the false assumption that the country was threatened by Communist takeover Caamano has refused to meet with Imbert until he purges sev eral leading officers from the armed forces His chief foe is Brig Gen Elias Wessin y Wes sin commander of the San Isi dro training base who directed the forces that opposed Caa manos rebel fovcns con measure sent to governor DES MOINES AP The Iowa Senate accepted a House amendment Wednesday and sent to the governor a bill to appropriate money in run the Slate Welfare Department and allow distribution of birth con rol information and devices to welfare recipients The Senate earlier passed the bill to appropriate and allow the department to provide family planning birth control services The House amendment ccpted by the Senate provides that a social worker disseminat ing birth control information would not be in violation of Iowa law against obscenity The measure was one of and ac and passed a second time US Embassy officials said Monday that Wessin had agreed to resign but later changed his mind Imbert said Tuesday he would accept Wessins resigna tton if it is his wish The unofficial total of Ameii can dead in the Dominican Re public rose to 14 A US Army lieutenant WAS killed and seven other para troopers were wounded Monday night when they were caught in sniper crossfire The rebels con tended the paratroopers were five blocks outside the US policed international safety zone A US spokesman said they were inside the zone US forces brought up a 106mm field gun and blastet two rooftops where the snipers were believed hidden At leas two Dominican civilians were reported wounded A rebel spokesman ehargec hat US troops have killed 22 inarmed civilians and woundec 11 since May 3 The Organization of American States ordered part of its peace mission back to the Dominican Republic from Washington in a new effort to find a settlement The OAS decided because of the Dominican crisis to post pone an interAmerican confer ence of foreign ministers set for May 20 in Rio de Janeiro Secretary of Stale Dean Rusk arrived in London to explain American actions in the Domin ican Republic and Viet Nam before a secret session of the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza tion At the United Nations the United Slates rejected a Uru guayan proposal to give Secre taryGeneral U Thant a watch dog role Ambassador Adlai E Stevenson said such action would complicate OAS efforts to re store peace so that the Domini cans coulrf choose their own government Irt San PR Communist Dominican editor said he could add 350 names Signals end on impact Retrorockets didnt fire MOSCOW ffl The So let Lunik 5 reached moons surface Wednes day but the Tass news agency in announcing this ndicated if had not made he soft landing antici pated During the flight and the ap proach a great deal of informa ion was obtained which necessary for the further elab oration of a system for a soft anding on the moons surface lass said The landing was at pm CST in the area of the Sea of Clouds The Jodrell Bank observatory n England said the signals from the vehicle ceased at 1 p m CST and speculated that the might have failed to produce a soft landing The retrorockets are meant to slow down the rockets so that it lands slowly on the moon without breaking tip The 3250pound spacecraft launched Sunday from an orbit ing earth satellite was expected to come down gently near the moons south pole on a plain known as the Sea of Clouds The United States does not plan to softland an instrument package on the moon until 1966 If Lunik 5 had succeeded in letting itself down gently on the moons surface it would havs taken two big steps forward in the space race 1 It can sit on the surface and radio back to earth data of a kind that it has not been possi ble to obtain from photographs made Ly craft that crashed into the moon 2 It will show whether a man can land on the moon with presently available types of space systems Tass said that elements oC the system of soft landing on the moon are being tried out for the first time on the automatic sta tion Lunik 5 An earlier version of this an nouncement said only that ihe spacecraft carried equipment for a soft landing Previous Soviet and American moon shots have either crashed into the moon stopping the flow of radioed information or missed it Scientists have said that a soft landing is achieved elec tronic devices could analyze substances on the moons sur face and send the information back to earth Such information could be a big factor in the con tinuing controversy over the moons origin Scientists have said too that similar soft landings on planets could establish if life exists there and perhaps reveal the origin of the solar system Tass said that according t o telemetric measurements systems aboard Lunik 5 were working normally Soviet Union rook ear ly lead in lunar exploration in 1S59 when it sent three probes to the moon in quick succession One of these radioed back the first pictures of the dark side of he moon The US space probe Ranger 9 an 809pound electronic pack age crammed with television cameras sent back more than 5000 pictures of the lunar sur face before crashing into a moon crater on March 24 ARTIST DfES NEW HOPE Pa Raymond Ney 72 widely known artist died Monday Ney exhib ited his paintings in several cit es in the United States and m France Germany Switzerland and Mexico jwivi auu jnj Jiatljc dozen bills on which the Senate to list of Communists in th accepted House amendments Dominican Republic issued b Washington DATC1H4Z4J v   

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