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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 5, 1965 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 5, 1965, Mason City, Iowa                                Agree on end to strike Packers to vote on plan DES MOINES AP Tenta tive agreement was reached early Monday on a proposal to settle a monthold strike at the Iowa Beef Packers plant at Fort Dodge Agreement came after nearly continuous sessions at Gov Har old Hughes office last weekend The settlement was an nnunccd about 4 am by Robert Cruise federal mediator who had taken part in the discus sions between Iowa Beef of ficials and representatives ol the United Packinghouse Work ers Union The governor sat in on the sessions Crusic said details of the pro posal would be announced later after the settlement had been submitted to members of Loca 1135 which has been on strike at the Fort Dodge plant since March 6 The negotiators started th sessions at 1 pm Saturday in the governors office They too a break from 1 am Sunday un til 10 am and then went intc the long session that finall cracked the stalemate On Sunday it was announcec that Hughes had gotten th company to give up its plans t open ihe plant with supervisor personnel Monday Hughes had called he extra ordinary negotiation sessions in liis office after he was informed Friday of thecompanys inten tions to resume plant opera lions He apparently was worried about the possibility of violence at tile plant which has been the scene nf vandalism and other incidents since the strike start ed The union and the company negotiated for seven months in an attempt to reach a contract agreement before the strike was called The union was recog nized as the workers bargain ing agent late last year Going into the marathon nego dating sessions the dispute be tween the company and the un ion had centered on handling ol workers who went out on wild cat or unauthorized strikes The company wanted authority to handle such cases The union sought to have them turned over to an arbitration board Heading the company rcpre srnlalives at the sessions in the governors office was A D And crson Iowa Beef president Top union spokesman was Ralph Helstein international presided from Chicago Quake in Greece is fatal to 20 ATHENS Greece AP violent earthquake struck th center of the Peloponnesus Per Insula Monday killing at least 2 persons and injuring 200 Polic said the final death toll migh go as high as iO The victims were in a score of villages in the Megalopolis area KH miles southwest of Athens They were caught in the wreck age of collapsing houses as they slept Fifty of the injured svere in serious condition Thousands wandered dazed through Ihe ruins Five of the worst hit villages were per cent destroyed and uninhabitable The rolling quake hit at am H destroyed 2000 homes and left many villages cut off from all communication Megalopolis was hard hit and the population of 2507 was in panic The newspaper that mokes all North lowans neighbors Home Edition VOL 105 MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY APRIL 5 IMS a Paper Consists of Two Oiw AuocUted No Ian farm spending cut U S embarrassed by loss of jets to MIGs WASHINGTON AP Pentagon officials were embarrassed Mon day because the Air Force came off second best in the first air combat with Communist fight ers since the Korean war To deepen the embarrass ment the Communist MIGs shot down two of this countrys mod ern fighterbombers over North Viet Nam with models dating back to the Korean War period Gen J P McConncll Ait Force chief of staff was report ed irked over the incident As one source put it When they get ours and we dont gel theirs you know how he feels A report reaching here said the pilot of an FlOO fighter es corting the F105 fighterbomb ers on a strike against a key rail and highway bridge thoughthe winged a MIG with a 20mm cannon shot However confirmation of such a hit was lacking The six attacking MIGs disappeared back into a haze from which they jumped the fighter bomb ers The MIGs bore North Viet namese markings and presuma bly were part of 30 such aircraft based at fields near Hanoi McConnell Gen Earle G Wheeler chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and others were in the Pentagon on Sunday reading the cable reports on the incident No official would speak out publicly but their discomfiture was evident from private re marks The Defense Department is sued an unusual Sunday state ment which played down the loss of the two 105s and other craft and emphasised results of US and South Vietnamese air strikes against three important bridges in North Viet Nam The Pentagon said the strikes inflicted serious damage by ruining the bridges which it called vital links in the North Vietnamese transportation sys tem supporting Communist guerrilla operations in South Viet Nam and Laos The vital importance of these bridges to the North Vietnamese was indicated by the heavy an tiaircraft defenses and by the fact that MIG interceptor air craft were employed for the first time it added The Pentagon statement un like official information given out in Saigon did not mention that the Thanh Hoa bridge had to be hit a second lime Sunday because it had been only slight ly damaged in an attack the day before There had been unconfirmed reports that US bombing accu racy in the attacks into North MIGs Please turn to Page 2 5 hurt in 2car accident Dougherty lad critically hurt A 3ycaroId Dougherty boy vas in critical condition in a Mason City hospital Monday vith head injuries suffered 2car accident Saturday ning Michael Huisman was thrown Vom an automobile driven by us father Harold W Huisman iftcr it was struck fro m the c a r by another car and crashed into a tree miles south of Mason City on High way 65 Huisman 27 was hospitalized with back injuries The boys mother Carol 25 his brother John 1 and his sister Debra G also were in the car at the ime 01 the accident All were in the hospital Sunday except Debra who was examined and released A highway patrolman sum moned to the scene said the Huisman car was going north and was struck from the rear by a car driven by Robert Charles Richey 20 Rockwell The patrolman said Huismans car was pushed off the high way and struck a tree on the east side of the road Richcys car was in a ditc on the opposite side of the roar after the collision The acci dent occurred at about pm during a light rain Neither Richey nor a passen ger in his car David C Simon of Rockwell was injured Richey was charged with drunk driving by the highway patrol The patrolman said Richey also was driving while his license was under suspen sion as a result of careless driving about a year ago Richey had been released from custody Sunday after posting bond on the drunk FIVE PERSONS WERE IN CAR WHEN IT SMASHED INTO TREE Autobahn closed briefly BERLIN AP East Ger man Communists defying West ern access rights to West Ser in closed the Berlin autobahn for more than 3A hours Monday and MIG jet fighters flew across the air corridors leading to the divided city The Communists claimed their actions were necessary because of East GermanSoviet military maneuvers Westerners believed they were in retaliation for West Germanys plans to hold a session of Parliament in West Berlin Wednesday to un derline the Wests contention that West Berlin is part of West Germany It was the first time in 1G years that the Communist com pletely halted all automobile traffic moving to and from Ber lin over the 110mile highway through East Germany Second ary roads were open but some delays were reported and Helmstaedt on the West jcrman frontier went down at am Armed Communist No big danger now Swea City hardest hit as waters rise to cross East Germany The barriers were lifted again at 1 pm in Berlin and at 2 pm at Helmstaedt In the air Allied radar screens picked up one MIG ighter over a US Air Force Convair transport flying the air corridor to Berlin Another MIG buzzed Tegel Airport in the French sector of Berlin coming down to 300 feet Although it isnt on any of the streams or rivers which general ly cause flood trouble for North pear to be in any immediate danger of extensive flooding At Charles City the Cedar River was reported to be rising The Globes Iowa Line driving charge and bond on the suspension charge GEN ADAMS DIES MANILA Gen Clayton Adams 74 U S Army retired died Sunday of a heart attack Iowa the Kossuth County anc 9 am imunily of Swea Citv appeared to be the town in the area hard est hit by high water Monday School in Ihe town of 800 had to be canceled Monday as wa ter ran M18 inches deep down the streets Highway 9 the main eastwest artery of t h e community was closed to traffic because of the draining surface water A blacktop which runs northsouth through town also was closed In the rest of North Iowa riv ers and streams continued to tisc Monday but communities along the waterways didnt ap Monday The ClnhcGixelUx cxcluilre telephone wire used la fither Information for lhl article v V fV AV the rivers level stood at 153 feel nearly three feet above flood stage This was still far below the level of 218 feet the river reached March J Several fam ilies still havent moved back into their homes along the river Clear Lake news Little girl who refused to die becomes a bride ASHLAND Mass A little girl who refused to quit was honeymooning Monday a little Jess than nine years afLer doctors gave her one chance in 100 lo live Judith Ann White once considered dying with burns over 75 per cent of her body was married Sunday to Edward J Marsden of Fram ingham at a simple service in the crowded Ash land Federated Church Marsden kept his honeymoon plans a secret even from his bride until after they departed from a wedding supper attended by some 200 friends and relatives Among the invited guests who didnt at tend was movie star Gregory Peck who be friended the bride then 12 while she was still on the critical list at the naval hospital in Chel sea Peck who sent the couple a monogrammed LITTLE GIRL him t 2 JUDY WHITE AND HUSBAND A I ncc being evacuated during lat flood according to Charles ity Mayor Lee Albaugh Despite the slowly rising Albaugh is confident the forst is over He pointed out lat a lot of water has gone y here in the last three or four ays Albaugh also pointed out hat the river doesnt spread ut much until it reaches 17 eel The community was not etting jittery he concluded At Nashua officials reported he Cedar River was rising two r three inches an hour but was till three or four eet below the cvcl reached in Ihe record flood f 1961 At Greene officials said the own was holding its own gainst the waters of the Shell ock River There were some anxious lomcnts Sunday night official aid when one of the ice jams locking the river gave way he rivers level rose rapidly horlly after that happened but ad settled clown hy mid morning Monday By Monday the rivers leve vas 5Vi feet above normal 5even feet above normal is con idered flood stage Some fam lics who live along the rivers ast bank in the south part of Ircenc were moved out Sunday night Officials also reported that the iver had cut new channels around two ice jams One of the ams is located north of the community and the other is ocated south of the town At Algona the level of the east fork of the Ues Moines River raised five feet from Sat irday afternoon until Monday morning Streams in Mason City were lolding fairly steady Monday afternoon with some fluctua tions and still not threatening serious flooding Water had spilled into East Park where the Winnebago River and Willow Creek join Both streams rose steadily Sunday night but then Willow Creek dropped about a foot in the morning hours I Monday to flash over the runway of th airfield The steel barriers at Berlinj The Communists originall guards refused well as Allied Germans travelers as the Inside The Globe Test ion engine in space Designed for fast travel By RALPH DIGHTON AP Science Writer indicated that the closure of th autobahn would last until 4 prr The fact that the highway wa reopened earlier look som Westerners by surprise Short before West Berlin had been buzzing with rumors that the US Army was preparing an armed convoy that would chal lenge the right of the East Ger mans to close the border There was some thought here that the Russians ordered the reopening because they did not want confrontation with the US Army The Russians had notified the Western powers that Soviet mil itary aircraft would fly across the air corridors and that cer tain altitudes could not be used by the three Western airlines that serve West Berlin Editorials 4 Society news789 North Iowa news 10 Sports 1112 Bowling 13 Mason City news141518 Latest markets 14 h Comics lo The Soviets said they wanted to use the altitudes from 2000 to 4000 feet Commercial planes normally fly between 6000 and 7000 feet except on their ap proach to Berlin The airlines have experienced VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE Calif AP A 970 lound satellite which could hold he key to yearslong missions n space had a second critical est Monday Sometime during the early morning scientists sent a sig nal turning on a tiny ion engine prototype of an electronicbeam device designed eventually for speeds up to 100000 miles an hour Success of the test was expect ed to be disclosed later by Gen Bernard Schriever head of the Air Force Systems Command The satellite launched Satur day cleared its first hurdle ear ly Sunday when a small nuclear reactor called SNAP10A achieved full power generating 580 watts of electricity The Atomic Eneegy Commis sion said it was the first time a nuclear reactor operated in or bit and called it a significant advance in this countrys space and atomic energy programs Plans called for electricity generated by the reactor and stored in a bank of batteries to start up the ion en gine for a onehour run In a tiny lank about the size of a lemon the engine carried enough fuel to operate for 300 hours It was expected to be shut down however after one hour test runs daily over the next three months In its 700milehigh polar or bit the satellite was expected to stay aloft 3000 years The reac Retail prices to go up Burden to consumers WASHINGTON Johnson administration Monday proposed legisla tion designed to cut federal arm spending more than million a year But re ail prices of bread and other foods probably would be pushed up million or more a year The extra million in food costs would go toward increasing farm income In effect the changes would shift part of the cost of farm programs from the government to consumers Savings to the government would come from a major change in the wheat subsidy program and modifications in rice supports and a cropland re duction program all outlined in a farm bill sent to Congress Foods which would be expect ed to rise in price include bread bakery products flour other wheat products and rice Present government farm price and income stabilization programs cost more than bil lion a year The net farm in come last year was about 5126 billion Along with wheat the farm bill proposed a twoyear exten sion of the feed grains program and a fouryear extension of the wool stabilization program both with some changes a sharp modification in the rice sup port program a cropland retire ment system offering rental pay ments for land taken out of sur plus crops and authority for farmers to sell lease or other wise transfer acreage planting allotments The measure contained no recommendations for either the cotton program or for creation of an emergency food reserve both of which Johnson had men tioned in a special farm mes sage on Feb 4 Administration officials said cotton wasnt included because no agreement has been reached on possible improvements The food reserve plan still is being studied which would 17 Classified pages 1319 North Iowa Weather outlook Cloudy through Tuesday Rain and occasional thunder storms Monday night ending early Tuesday Lows Monday night in mid 30s Cooler Tues day highs upper 30s north to low 40s south threats in the past andtor was expected to be turned went ahead with their flights Up to noon there had been no interference with the Western air traffic A US military convoy made the road trip from West Berlin to West Germany without inter ference but it left the divided city before the East Germans off in about a year The Air Force called the sat ellite Snapshot a guarded but obvious reference to the photo graphic surveillance potential of spacecraft carrying reactors to power complicated television spy systems The first part of closed the superhighway across the name comes from the AECs East Germany A British military spokesman said Soviet soldiers halted three British cars as they tried drive out of Berlin to SNAP program to develop reac tors small enough for space craft The initials stand for sys tems for nuclear auxiliary pow The wheat program would cover two years work this way Wheat grown for domestic food use would be supported at the parity price goal of federal farm programs which in the case of this grain is about a bushel Under the present pro gram domestically consumed wheat is supported at As in thecase now all wheat grown by farmers complying with the program by holding down acreages would be eligible for price supports at about a bushel the same as at pres ent The millers would have to pay a bushel on all wheat milled for domestic consumption compared with 75 cents now loney paid by millers through urchase of marketing certifi cates would go to farmers com iying with the program on tha asis of their share of the do mestic food wheat market of ibout 500 million bushels This would mean that wheat or domestic food use would cost millers at least 50 cents a bushel more than at present They would be expected to pass this cost on to consumers in the brm of higher prices for flour bread and other wheat products The wheat support would be at or near the world market price a fact that would permit the elimination of the present export certificate and export subsidy on wheat moving abroad EAST GERMANS DISRUPT TRAFFIC ON AUTOBAHN A BritfoTcar is turned back by East German Communist border guards while its driver was attempting to leave West Berlin on the autobahn corridor to West Germany SAME   

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