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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 27, 1964, Mason City, Iowa                                warning to Nazis Letter bombs in mail boxes By SEYMOUR FREIDEM Now York HoraldTribono Nowi Service bombs that explode but scare far more than they harm have been added to the weaponry of the secret war in the Middle East by Israelis and Arabs Posted in mail boxes through out Cairo these guided missives are addressed to Nazi scientists working for President Nasser and his rocket program They are sent with letters en closed signed by The Gideon ites Center Senders claim to be exvictims of concentration camps who have vowed to keep these scientists from finishing Nassers rocket program Thai project is expected if unhin dered to trigger off rockets against Israel by Easter 1966 The letter bombs which have circulated for some months bul have been unmentioned for ob ivious reasons by Egyptian Se curity have scared a few scien tists into precipitous flights from Egypt Letters enclosed to specific targets warn bluntly that if the recipient doesnt get the pre monitory message sent the ex plosive content of what could come next may well be fatal Presently a eompounc amounting to 15 grams of ex plosive is packaged within the letter The Gideonites dont say how the pyrotechnical com pound is mixed and fixed to ex plode It works and has been the cause of great consternation in comfortable villas allocated to Nazi scientists at Zamalek a posh suburb of Cairo The Gideonites so named after the biblicalfigure for jus tice and reform in ancient Is rael have been driving Egyp tian security dizzjK Their net work operating right in Cairo also hasextensions arounc Europe In their letter bombs the ad dressee is often told of how he has been uncovered whoare the members of hisjfamilyan his background in case he sci enlist feels he had hidden his identity They would be very sur prised and not a little worried if they knew how much infor mation is hahdscbncera ing them arid their activitiesj say the Gideonites of their tar getst A All of these scientists they contend come under the head ing Enemies working for the destruction of the Jewish peo pie We shall treat them accord ingly runs the threat Its hardly an empty threa as could be told in Cairo if the authorities owned up Soonei than later its also bound to ge tauter and tougher as all secre wars do N lowans winners at stock show By GlobeGazette Staff Writer started u where they left off at last year International Live Stock Exposi tion by winning two of the firs four classes in the Junior Stee Show at the World Series o cattle shows Class winners from the Hawk eye state early Friday were Hereford senior calf exhibite by Larry Cherveny Van Home and an Angus summer yearlin shpwn by Shirlee Jansen On slow Both these steers now mov up to compete for breed cham pionship honors An Illinoi Angus and an Indiana Shorthor also won their classes Frida morning Several North lowans ha animals placing high in the Fr day morning judging Tom Henry veteran Algon Junior exhibitor had a 16t place steer in the Angus sen ior calf class and Lynn an Roxy Alden Hancock Count 4H members from Garner hot had animals in the top 20 in th Angus summer yearling class Besides the two class win ncrs Iowa had a second and third in the other two classe David Stoner Mt Vernon ha the secondplace Shorthorn sen lor calf and Stanley Huliinge Humeston had the third plac Angus senior calf Iowas big sweep in the earl judging however came in th Hereford senior calf class B aides Chervenys firstplace an mal lowans exhibited the nex six place winners Paul McKln ley had the secont place steet and Dean Freed Paullina exhibited the thin place animal A The newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors Home Edition MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY NOVEMBER 27 1H4 Van Wine VOL 104 a I tapu Constati ttoo No 250 Congo rebels repulsed Study of Viet Nam war may lead to expansions Taylor is in capital for talks By JOHN M HIGHTOWER AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON AP Sec retary of State Dean Rusk and Ambassador Maxwell D Tay lor started Friday an intensive reappraisal of US strategy in anti Communist war in Viet Nam The study may lead to a decision by President Johnson to broaden the war Taylor met with Rusk early Friday morning beginning a schedule of talks to be climaxed by White House sessions with President Johnson and other decision makers next week The to be ward a cautious expansion of administration appeared moving reluctantly to Photofax STRATEGY TALKS Ambassador Maxwell D Taylor arrives at Andrews Air Force Base near Washington returningto the capital for toplevel strategy talks on the war in South Viet Nam with key administration officials and President Johnson Viet Nam He was met at the airport by Senelect Robert Ken sticking to nedy DNY Secret Service the conflict beyond South Viet Nam in the hope of improving prospects for a peaceful settle ment Johnson and other top admin istration officials are reportec to have divided feelings abou strategy between confining the war almost entirely to South Viet and making some strikes to the north action to end Hundreds are still missing LEOPOLDVILLEThe Congo AP Government troops re pulsed rebel counterattacks in Stanleyville Friday but the Bel gian paratrooper phase of the operation to rescue white host ages was ending Belgian press reports from Stanleyville said rebel remnants attacked the Stanleyville airport and were repulsed These ac counts reported that rebels hold ing the west bank of the Congo tried to cross the river for an attack on Kitele the military camp in Stanleyville but also were turned back IN FRIENDLIER SURROUNDINGS Men women and children rescued from rebels in The Con Photofax go walk from US planes following safe arrival in around area Despite the reports that Leopoldville Military personnel form an outer ring Belgian paratroopers might protection WASHINGTON AP The ecret Service will expand its machinery for presidential pro ection significantly in the next ew months adding 75 agents lerks and technical personnel as the first step Secretary of the Treasury Douglas Dillon said the basic emphasis will be on more ef ective advance and preventive work by the service in connec ion with presidential travel as well as the use of more sophis icated equipment The Secret Service is under he Treasury Department In announcing the plans Fri Inside The Globe NORTH IOWA Southern Minnesota educatio n a 1 recommended Page 6 Editorials 4 Clear Lake news 5 Mason City news 67 Latest markets 7 North Iowa news 8 Sports news 910 Television news Society news 1314 Comics 15 Transit timetable 16 Classified pages 1617 day Dillon said the hiring of 75 additional persons would cost approximately The Secret Service has not made public its exact number of agents but the present total is believed about 400 There already has been some increase in the Secret Service since the assassination of Pres ident John F Kennedy Dillons statement said the program of further expansion has the approval of the Presi dents Committee on the War ren Report Shortly after the investigating commission headed by Chief Justice Earl Warren issued its report on the assassination President Johnson appointed the committee of Cabinet offi cers to study presidential pro tection The Warren Commission crit icized both the Secret Service and the FBI with particular emphasis on the failure to spol Lee Harvey Oswald as a threat to the President before Kenne dys iateful trip to Dallas Dillon said the full program to strengthen the Secret Service will take up to 20 months The references to sophisticat ed equipment and technical per sonnel indicate the service is moving ahead with plans to use electronic data processing meth ods in trying to ferret out po tential assassins and keep track of their whereabouts Taylor who r e turned to Washington Thursday is known that tWrtimefoifriew decisions is at hand Further more he sees some advantages n authorizing and promptly un dertaking air strikes either against Communist supply lines rom North Viet Nam to South Viet Nam through the neighbor ng kingdom of Laos or against Communist concentration points for men and supplies in the north Taylor recently declared that the outcome of the conflict is now very much in doubt But he said he thought attacks on targets in Redheld territory would probably make the Chinese and North Vietnamese qmmunist leadership realize that the conquest it seeks in the south will become too expensive because of impending damage in the north The ambassador is reported to believe that such attacks might thus compel the Hanoi regime to reconsider its policies and enter into negotiations on terms more favorable to South Viet Nam than are now consid ered possible Another benefit Taylor is be lieved to see in strikes to the north is that they might have heartening effect upon military and antiCommunist elements hi the south Government instability has been for months one of the mos serious problems in South Vie Nam Though Taylor praised Jobless rate in Iowa down Alltime low of 19 per cent DBS MOINES Ioyment in Iowa hit an alltime ow of 19 per cent of the work orce in October the Iowa Em ployment Security Commission said Friday This compares with a national igure of 52 per cent more than double the Iowa jobless rate owa had 21 per cent of its workers without jobs in Sep ember and 25 per cent in mid summer A high rate of agriculture imployment helped keep the number of jobless persons smal despite a decline in offthefarm obs in the SeptemberOctober period Farm employment climbed to 242900 as it reflected harvesl activity and good weather bul failed to reach the 260400 mark set in October 1963 The commission said almost 5000 persons in nondurable goods manufacturing were idlec by labor disputes but there were gains in other types of factory employment Construction job losses were lower than usual and the com mission said good weather would help this trend continue in November Average weekly earnings hi the courage and determina tion of the new civilian pre mier Tran Van Huong author ities here say the situation wil get increasingly desperate un less the new regime can demon strate it can command and en list support frorti such political VIETNAM Continued en Page 2 N Iowa Chicago trip gets off to bad start By CHARLES W WALK North Iowa News Director CHICAGO Youve heard the one about the best laid plans of mice and men Well it was something like that with the 16th annual Mason CityNorth Iowa Fair Youth Award Trip to Chicago Thurs day Scheduled to arrive in the Windy City aboard a special fivecar train about pm Thursday the 250plus North lowans making this years trip were a long way from the bright lights on Michigan Ave when thai mgic bow arrived It wasnt until about an hour and 45 minutes later that the lowans representing 15 coun into Chicagos La salle St Station The culprit of the delayed ar rival was a broken steam line on the buffer car of special Rock Island train Discovered at Manly shortly after the train left Mason City at 4 pm Thurs day the steam line incident re sulted in an hour and a half layover in Manly The delay was bad enough for the 150 or so North lowans who had boarded the train at Mason City and Manly but it was as had for the remaining sters and their who waited for the special at Rock ford and Cedar Falls At Reckford for example the 28 delegates from Floyd County huddled in a heatless depot or in autos beside the track while Dale Staudt Floyd County ex tension director and trip leader tried to figureout if he had mis read the trip schedule sent out by the sponsoring organizations Mason City Chamber of Commerce and the North Iowa Fair Staudt hadnt misread the YOUTH TRIP Continued on 2 V an October high of which was more than in September and above a year earlier Layoffs were at a record low of 13 per 1000 employes Postpone flight of Mariner 4 CAPE KENNEDY Fla AP problems with the spacecraft Friday forced post ponement of an attempt to launch Mariner 4 to Mars to take pictures and probe scien tific secrets No new launching date was set immediately The launch crew had only a 3hour 13minute favorable peri od ending at pm CST in which lo fire the AtlasAgena Photofax NEWEST THING AT Steve Leko helps baby black rhinoceros Buelah pose for her portrait in the Detroit Zoo Buelah is the ninth black rhino born in the United States Her mother Manda died 10 days after the birth of Beulah The animal now weight 107 pounds her mother weighed 2350 Buelah is responding to a diet of milk and other in gredients She is 24 days old 4 teens killed in two crashes rocket to achieve the desired trajectory When the trouble could not be corrected in time the shot was called off for the day North Iowa Weather outlook Snow or f reeling end ing by Saturday morning Warmer through Friday night 2025 Colder Saturday near 30 Weather Dot on Pego 2 1 FORT DODGE WVTwo car loads of Fort Dodge teenagers returning from a wedding recep tion cracked up in separate ac cidents late Thursday night leaving four dead and 10 in jured The deaths raised to eight the number of Iowa traffic fatali ties since the start of the holiday period at 6 pm Wednesday One car containing six boys ran off a deadend intersection of a county black top road eight miles south of Duncombe which is near Fort Dodge Killed in that crash were Frederick Jo seph Wickman the driver Tony Sanders and Russell Witte each 7 The wedding reception had been held at the American Le gion Club at Duncombe The car in which three died went out of control about 11 pm Their companions Richard Wickman 15 brother of the driver Charles Fetters and John Man usos were taken to Lutheran Hospital in Fort Dodge About midnight a second car containing six boys and two girls rolled off US Highway 20 about nine miles east of Fort Dodge Terry Taylor 17 was killed Taken to Lutheran Hospital WILSON VISITS LONDON Prime Minister Harold Wilson plans to visit sev eral major capitals of Europe early next year allied were Dennis Mussellman 17 his brother Roland Mussell man 19 Mike Licht 17 anc Floyd Hanson 20 The two girls in this car Marcella Buckley 19 and Don na Liest 18 and the driver William Stock 22 were treatec and released Northwood man victim of accident And erson 63 of Northwood wa fatally injured in a onecar ac cident Thursday about p m His car overturned on US 65 near Glenville Minn He wa taken to the Naeve Hospital ii Albert Lea where he died earl Friday Born Aug 28 1901 in Wort County he was the son of Alec and Mary Johnson Anderson He had lived in California unt about two years ago when h returned to the Northwood area Surviving arc a son Earl i the Army in California a brotl er Almond Boone three si ters Mrs M W Thea Dam en California Mrs Jack Ma bel Weed Florida Mrs L Amy Peterson Mason City He was a veteran of World Wi I and a member of Northwoo Lutheran Church Funeral services are pendin at the Conner Funeral Home Stanleyville A city of desolation By ROBIN MANNOCK STANLEYVILLE The Congo AP is a city of esolation of bloodstains and nburied corpses rotting in the ropic sun Until Belgian p a ratroopers nded rebel rule Tuesday Stan eyville was the capital of the ekinbacked Congolese Peo les Republic The city had 00000 inhabitants including more than 1000 xvhitcs At least 38 of the whites are ow believed to have been laughtered by the rebels in a astminute bloodbath before the aratroopers seized the citys enter Two were Americans r Paul Carlson of Rolling lills Calif a Protestant medi al missionary who had been ondemned to death by the reb s as a spy and Phyllis Rine f Cincinnati Ohio a Protestant mission worker About 300 rebels or rebel sup to have make more drops Premier Theo Lefevre of Belgium said in Brussels that Belgian rescue operations in the Congo will end Friday The Belgian premier told re porters that unless the opera tion were brought to an end we would run the risk of get ting involved in the Congos civil war orters are believed ied in Stanleyville Except for heavily armed mil ary trucks the streets are mpty Shop windows are shat ered or scarred by bullet holes hop doors are open but there is o one behind the counters Automobiles are abandoned in tie middle of streets Many ave flat tires others have open nods They have been stripped or spare parts The rattle of automatic rifles and machine guns is a constant eminder of the rebel presence remier Moise Tshombes white mercenaries and Belgian para roopers are trying to flush out he snipers Across the 1000yardwide 2ongo River the rebels are still masters of a section of Stan eyville Mercenary pilots in converted T6 training planes day after a blasted the south bank of the which one river with rockets and machine killed guns Maj Michael Hoare 46 com mander of the South African mercenaries dropped one rebel across the river with a rifle shot rom his hotel window There is plenty of evidence of Chinese Communist influence I slept Tuesday night in the hotel room of a senior officer of the nonexistent rebel air force He lad a large set of Mao Tze ungs works Articles in the rebel newspap er The Marty show a strong proChinese influence Back lumbers of Uie biweekly news letter give evidence of the reb els glee at the ouster of Nikita Khrushchev Since the USBelgian air borne operation began Tuesday at least 59 foreigners including three Americans have been slain by the rebels The para troopers rescued about 1600 white hostages in Stanleyville and Paulis Violent protests against tha Western powers continued in Communist and African capi tals In Cairo hundreds of Afri can students burned the US Information Agencys John F Kennedy Memorial Library and a Marine barracks in the US Embassy compound No one was hurt The US and Belgian embas sies were stoned in Nairobi Kenya and the US British and Belgian embassies were at tacked in Prague There was speculation that the rebels would take the offen sive again when the Belgian paratroopers are withdrawn this weekend Premier Moiso Tshombes white mercenaries and supporting Congolese army troops did not appear to have sufficient strength t o consoli date the rapid gains they have made across a vast area of the northern Congo An official in Stanleyville former rebel capital said only about a square mile of that city was firmly controlled by gov ernment forces To the south the rebels recaptured the tin mining town of Punia taken last week by the government troops on their march toward Stanleyville In addition to 38 white hos tages reported killed in Stan leyville the rebels battered at least 21 whites to death in Pau lis 250 miles northeast of Stan leyville before a force of 267 Belgians seized the city Thurs brief skirmish in paratrooper was SAME Ground fire damaged four of the seven US planes that car ried the Belgians One of those killed in Paulis was the Rev Joseph Tucker of Springfield Mo the third American reported killed this week The others were medical missionary Paul Carlson of Rolling Hills Calif and Phyllis Rine of Cincinnati Ohio a Prot estant mission worker Both died in Stanleyville With their hands tied Tucker and at least 16 other whites were beaten to death with clubs and bottles at a Dominican mis sion Jean Degotte honorary Belgian consul in Paulis said the rebels in recent weeks had slaughtered about 4000 Congo lese who were not sympathetic to their cause The paratroopers saved about 200 of the 300 whites in Paulis but the fate of the others was not known It was believed fleeing rebels might have taken them into the bush as hostages At Stanleyville rebel CONGO on Pago 2   

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