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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 10, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 10, 1964, Mason City, Iowa                                The newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors Home Edition VOL 104 MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY JULY 10 10c i Piper Consist of Two Preu Full No 130 C10UDHUUST A car splashes through waterfilled streets east received 14 of an inch Water ran curbfull in many area iear Lake after a cloudburst Thursday afternoon Clear Lake throughout Clear Lake as the sudden deluge of ram was too great Mississippi force received LSTinches of Tain between 4 prn and Surrounding for storm sewers to carry off rural areas received little or no rain Mason City 10 miles to the 39 killed Probe cause of air crash 50 new agents assigned New office is opened WASHINGTON ffi President Johnson announced Fiday that 50 FBI agents will be per manently assigned to a new office in Mississippi Johnson announced the figure at another of his impromptu news conferences this one held the cabinet room The White House has said earlier that additional agents of the Federal Bureau of Investiga tion were sent to Mississippi in NEWPORT Tcnn ers gathered grim evidence Fri day of death and destruction which followed the crash and burning of a United Air Lines plane near this mountainous East Tennessee town late Thursday All 9 persons aboard killed Investigators bags ol fragments including 23 bodies removed by fmidmorning to a special morgue set up in Newports Municipal Auditori um National Guard units from nearby Morristown joined civil ians in the task Federal authorities rushed in to the area to seek clues which caused the big airliner to crash in good weather rpparently with little or no warning Some witnesses reported they saw the Viscount turboprop ex of San Francisco May 7 killing all 44 aboard Searchers found two flight nantials but had been unable to ind the planes automatic flight recorder Dr W B Robinson a New port physician remained at the crash scene throughout the okcd up and saw the plane moking and coming in toward a ill said Frank Turner 52 a Cocke County constable plodc and objects fall from it clouds shortly before dark The wreck age was scattered over a wide area in Ihc foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains near the North Carolina border The United flight originated in Philadelphia and was botiitd for Huntsville Ala The plariei had stopped in Washington andwas due in Knoxville 40 miles t6 the south six minutes ahcr it crashed United had asked the Federal Bureau of Investigation to make an inquiry into the nations worst airline crash since a Pa cific Airlines plane crashed cast night Im sure well find addiliona bodies when the wreckage lias been cleaned up he said FBI agents joined rescue workers Thursday night seek ing clues to the cause as well as aiding in identification The pilot Capt Oliver Sabatke of Washington radioec 13 minutes before the crash tha he was changing from an inslru ment to a visual flight plan There was a 4000foot ceiling 30mile visibility and scatlcrc I heard a screeching noiseling when the first rescue squads arrived A spokesman for the invesli Mrs Charles Hawk said she aw the fourengine plane ex loder and fall into the hollow iear her home Other witnesses reported see ng objects falling from the plane according to Willian Dureton captain of the Newpor emergency and rescue squad The plane smashed into the side of a hill known as Trent ham Hollow Bodies personal effects and wreckage were strewn over a halfsquare mile area One engine rolled 150 feet to the bottom of the hill A wing section was the largest piece of wreckage The wreckage still was burn gators at the scene of the crash isaid the team had found nothing o indicate a bomb had ex ploded aboard the plane as ome had thought through the night air as flash lights probed the dense under rush for victims of the crash The faint flickering glow of burning wing was the only ther light Bits of wreckage and cloth ng occasi o n a 11 y tell from splintered tree limbsas Ihe wake of the disappearance of three young civil rights workers but it declined to say how many agents were in the tate The new FBI Mississippi of ice is in Jackson the state capital It opened Friday Johnson discussed FBI men went silently at their grim task Watch that engine lodged the ties in Mississippi when asked against that tree someone said If it breaks loose therell Grim task at scene Editors note Kenneth Clark Associated Press writ er from Knoxville arrived at the scene after a United Air Lines plane crashed His story follows NEWPORT Tenn IA1 A strong smell of kerosene floated suggesting spots for a summer going gasoline engine action and light be some more of you clown that hill in a bag A portable coughed into suddenly flooded the area bringing the tragedy of the plane crash into even more awesome focus Whats this one man said It was a book partially burned explain the trip thereFriday by FBI Director J Edgar Hoov er The President said Hoover was opening the new office Jackson and while there would confer with and give instruc lions to the top FBI men in the state opening slate gave another Barry vows he would enforce rights laws vacation Frank Turner a 53yearold constable came along I saw it hit he said The hing came whining through the air with smoke trailing I think it blew up No one spoke for a moment and the sound of crickets at another time would have re minded one of a summer pic In one of his merits Johnson glowing report on the economy saying People know that times are good and getting better and they are responding by consum ing wisely investing soundly and showing restraint in price SAN FRANCISCO Instead he called for party not only in 1964 the trained eye me Barry Goldwater promised Fri day he would enforce the new civil rights law not seek its re peal and go beyond it in trying to end discrimination if he be comes president Goldwater got an ovation when he appeared before the Republican Platform Commit tee There were standingcheer ing demonstrations when he ar rived and when he finished speaking Applause cheers and whistles times interrupted his talk 42 Pholofax CREW Oliver E Sabatke 41 of Washington DC was captain and Charles L Young 35 of Baltimore Md was first officer of Ihc plane I unity and told platform writers he would not dictate what to put in their planks You must secfc a document that will unite us on principle ot divide us the Arizona con rvativc said In remarks delivered before ic platform committee at its inal hearing Goldwater said he ould not dictate what should go to the party planks Making little reference to the ibes of his trailing challenger M Jholofax STEWARDESSES Vir ginia K Vollmcr left and Carole L Bcrndt were the stewardesses aboard the plane The civil rights question came up when delegates were given a chance to question Goldwater after his speech Asked whether in view of his expressed opinion that parts o the new law are unconslitution al he would seek its repeal Goldwater said No Thats not in my opinion th duty of the president The legis lative branch spoken for th people and 1 accept the major ity viewiThe presidents job i to administer the law Goldwater said he would en force the law just as forme President Harry S Truman usec the TaftHartlcy Labor Relation Act even though it was passct over his veto In his speech to the comUlc Goldvyatcr made scant rcfcrcnc to the specific jabs losscd at his views by his rival Pennsyl vania Gov William W Scran ton before the same group Thursday William W Scranton ofj ennsylvania Goldwater said Let the creative differences1 Askcd vcn in your own committee iclp you build a platform not ear down the party He again expressed what he called his own philosophy a free society under constitution alism at home strength for reedom and peace abroad Thursday Goldwater replied a new fusillade of criticism iircd at him by Scranton Gold water said that he stands just where he has for a long for freedom at home and in the world Im lately cnce in Scrantons not a Johnnycorn e he told a news confer apparcnt reference to latestarting candi nmg about a possible run mate Goldwatcr didnt rule out anyboy He said hadnt made up his mind I ran up here Turner con tinued The whole place was on fire I saw a womans body holding what looked like child cradled in her arms They were on fire there was noth ing I could do The light went out and the flashlights took over again You want to go back down he hill someone asked I you do youll have to help carry this body The crickets chirped on an the fumes grew heavy Five of us took someon down that steep hillside RADIO PIONEER DIES NEW YORK UP Louis jllartman 80 a pioneer in radio died Thursday and wage policies Johnson predicted the eco nomic horizon will be bright but as far as can see into 1965 On other topics during the 30 linute session with two dozen cporters Johnson said Johnson did not care to say hethcr he agreed with a June 0 statement by Sen Barry SMILE Ann Sedars of Clear Lake right and KaroL Kelly of Tampa get their smiles beneath a Florida palm tree at the beginning of Smile Girl Week end Miss Kelly greeted Miss Sedars and 23 other candidates for the title of Pholofax Miss Smile of as in Tampa enroute to Cypress Gardens for the four days of fun and judging leading to the selection of a winner Sunday The candidates represent cities in 21 Love letters found from former President Harding loldwater his likely Republiical research has brought to an opponent in November thatlight carefully preserved love COLUMBUS Ohio historical magazine o GOP candidate could defeatSletters from ohnson as of now ling who I think said Johnson the lent to a Republican Party has enough roblems already without my adding to them in any way s k e d whether support rom big city Democratic bosses might give Atty Gen Robert F Kennedy a boost as a potential democratic vice presidential candidate Johnson said he would make recommendations For a running mate at the partys August convention Johnson said he hasnt con LBJ Continued on Page 2 5oslon historian said Friday late presidents hometown ofi said he was the first researcher to be granted access to the let written to the wife of a is doing research in Ohio Ha will return to his native Boston to write It Warren G Hard later became prcsilcrs wcre married woman aXlepartment store owner in were Most of the 250 letters found Francis Russell 54 a contrib uting editor to the American Marion Ohio They were 909 and 1920 SAME written to Mrs by handwriting and phrasing that Ularding wrote them The last between was written before Harding was James hillips of Marion and pre served by the attorney who was icr guardian after their discov ry following her death in 1960 Russell said they are the first documentary evidence support ng assertions that Harding while married had affairs with other women Russell interviewed in Col umbus said he is preparing a biography of Harding and still Former Osage girl says Mississippi Prison without bars North Weather outlook Partly cloudy with widely thunder through Saturday tem perature change Lows Friday night lower Ms Satur day in the Ms Weather details Page 2 On f he inside Editorials 5 Mason City Latest markets 7 CleaiLake news I Society 11U Comics Classified 141 North Iowa news By PAT CVJRRAN Associated Press Writer LAUREL Miss a civil rights worker in the Deep South is a little like being in jail Its not the kind of jail with stone walls and iron bars Marcia Moore 21rycarold col lege student from Forl Dodg has escaped all but one night in a jail of that sort The rights workers jail is of a different kind but with bars no less real for being intangible The bars consist of restric tions on what she wears and says where she goes and with whom she may associate or will associate with her Miss Moore is one of several hundred college students who volunteered to help Negroes get squared away under the new civil rights bill She was arrested in Laurel last Sunday on a charge of vagrancy because the prose cutor said she didnt have her purse with her when she and her while companion Thomas Watts 35 of Berkeley Calif were questioned by police Her purse was in the car in which she had been riding with Watts and two Negroes Walts got it for her but the charge stood She was convicted and sentenced to 10 days in jail but she escaped any more jail time because the sentence was sus pended She says she plans to appeal the sentence same day she starts to leach in a freedom school for Negro teenagers IB the Mississippi town v The school she related in a telephone interview is designed to make Negro young people more politically aware so they will ask questions about the system in Mississippi and try to improve it and to make them want to go to college Marcia and her fellow rights workers she says are the ob ject of constant public scrutiny For example She and Walts went to the sheriffs office in Laurel Wednesday so that Watts could gel the license plates changed on his car That afternoon the Laurel newspaper carried a full ac count of what they wore where they parked the car and what it looked like and what they did said in the sheriffs office Marcia dresses conservative ly At night she sticks prctly close to the threebedroom home of the Arthur Spinks family in the Negro section of town where she is staying because the vio lence usually comes at night Even in the daytime she rarely travels alone Her parents Dr and Mrs Edson E Moore of Fort Dodge said their daughter has reas sured them she is safe Dr Moore has turned down the re quest of a Southern official that he ask his daughter to come home Marcia was born in Osagc and moved to Fort Dodge with her parents when she was a child Her grandparents the late Mr and Mrs Frank Kings bury also lived at Osagc In the beginning we tried lo IOWA GIRL Continued on Page 2 nominated for president Russell said in an interview Thursday that internal evi dence in the Phillips letters gives credence to charges made by Nan Britton in a book she published in 1927 Miss Britton said she had been Hardings mistress for almost decade before his death on 2 1923 and that she gave irth to his daughter named Elizabeth Ann in Asbury Park NJ on Oct 22 1919 When challenged however she could not produce any tetters from Harding In her book she wrote Through mutual recognition of tho trouble we cause each other and the unhappiness that might befall we early decided to destroy all love letters Russell came upon the Phil lips letters while working on a new biography of Harding Since then an effort has been icgun to have the letters do nated to the Library of Con gress or some other institution and scaled for SO years Many of the Ictlors wcro writlen on the stationery of Iho US Senate in which Harding served before becoming presi dent or on postcards bearing his picture They were signed Warren or Warren G Hard ing or with the codo Constant MARCIA MOORE Mrs Phillips operated the UhlcrPhillips DC partment Store in Marlon died In I960 After many yearn M recluse she paused her days in an Institution for aged maintained by   

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