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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, April 27, 1964 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 27, 1964, Mason City, Iowa                             Church supports rights Mass meeting set Tuesday By RICHARD SPONG GlobeGeiotto Editorial Research Bureau WASHINGTON Church sup port for the cause of racial equality is taking a new turn White clergymen of the three principal religious faiths Protestant Catholic and Jewish began last summer to join protest marchers carry pla cards and risk arrest to register their commitment to the tech niques as well as the goals of civil rights demonstrators They were notably in the foreground in the Aug 28 civil rights march on Washington A logical outgrowth of this activity is a mass demonstration in the nations capital Tuesday The National Interreligious Con vocation in theMcDonough gym nasium of Georgetown University is described in advance as largest gathering of ministers priests and rabbis ever as sembled in a witness to racial justice The demonstration is be steal ly a joint undertaking of the Na tional Council of Churches the National Catholic Welfare Coun cil and the Synagogue Council of America and some 70 inter religious groups have been asked to participate The Most Rev Patrick AXQBoyle Archbishop of the Catholic Diocese of Wash ington will preside The McDonough gym will hold 3500 persons but an overflow crowd is expected and sound systems are being provided for those outside A specialsection is being reserved for members of Congress There will be 535 seats one for each senator and representative Each has re ceived a personal invitation with a request for a yes or no answer This is a technique first used al the Lincoln Memorial in the August march Church historians of the throe faiths have said that the Wash ington demonstration will const first time history of ChristendbnVithat Uje jchurch has spoken withone voicf on an issue of s u social andtpoKticaV concern The commitment is to a cam of jspintuajy leadership public private prayer for passage rights bill now before Sen ate It is perhaps a fortunate omen that on the eve of the con vocation of the bill seemed much improved Delegations are expected from at least 10 principal cities in cluding most of those on the At lantic littoraland ranging as far west as Des Moines Estimates of attendance havebeen revised upwards Neighboring Virginia was first expected to send 250 clergymen now a delegation of 350 appears likely Mass demonstrations for racia equality which began more than four years ago with the first lunch counter sitin atGreens boro NCi have had a markedly religious character from the be ginning Leadership of the move ment has been in large part ministerial Its techniques of passive resistance are grounded in Christian principles Demon strations have been marked with prayer hymn singing and church rallies But until recently the religious element had been almost soley the contribution of Negro church es and Negro churchmen With the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom it became evident that white church lead ers had joined the crusade White clergymen led groups of coreligionists who helped swell the total number of marchers to 200000 Tuesdays convocation is a continuation and at the same time a first step in a nationwide effort by major church leaders to mobilize a prayer and poli tics movement for human rights Longshoreman union official jgetifiyeyeaii Tenn AP Henry IV Bell vice president of the International Longshore mans Association was sen tenced Monday to five years in prison and fined on a jurytampering charge District Federal Judge Frank Gray Jr who handed the maximum penalty immediately overruled a motion for a new trial Defense attorneys said they plan to appeal i CORRESPONDENT OliS TOKYO George Thomas Folster 57 a formerwar cor respondent in the Far East for the National Broadcasting Co Saturday of a bean attack WASHINGTON The Su Teme Court refused Monday to eview a government arbitra ion board ruling that could mean ultimate loss of about 8000 jobs of railroad freight and yard firemen and other rain crewmen PERFORMANCE Honson 16 rehearses the part of Lola in a high school production of the musical Damn Yankees Seated on the knee of her leading man Mitch Skeld ing she wears the brief black outfit with a split skirt she uses for a dance that resulted in the excorn mumcation of a couple from the church Donee causes 2 to be ousted from church IONIA Mich An Ionia couple was excommunicated Sunday after charging their Episcopal priest with harboring rfittefe moral knowledge in his1criticism rof a dance in a high school produc tion of the musical Damn Yan kees 4 I Mr and Mrs Robert Clore were stripped of their member ship in the Ionia Episcopal Church the Rev Raymond Bierlein who said he acted be cause of a letter written by the Clores published Friday in the Ionia Daily SentinelStandard no looser restrain our feelings concerning the ob jections voiced by our rector to the dancing in the current high school musical play the letter said in part Terming a dance sequence salacious and immoral the Rev Mr Bierlein last Monday objected before the school board to the characterization of Lola in the play by 16yearold Krist Honson who wore a brief blac outfit with a split skirt Kristi playingthe role of th provocative ternptress dance into the audience and pinche cheeks I dont want any childre taught to dance like that for an excuse whatever Bierlein told the school board Kristi asaresult was 01 dered not to dance into theaudi ence by thesctiobl superintend ent Robert Boyce and director Raymond Monte The sent a committee to watch the play Friday and Saturday CJore whose Richard had a part in the play said am entitled to make this com ment about the play just much as the rector Bierlein said he decided on excommunication after talkin to Bishop Charles Bennison c the Western Michigan diocese Russian engineers battle flood water neers have begun blasting in an A J ters threatening the fabled Mon gol capital of Samarkand and villages along the Zeravashan River blocked bv a huge land slide The Communist party news paper Pravda said engineers sent to the edge of the Pamir Mountains in Southwest Asia Sunday night began blasting a canal through the slide which was said to be as highas an SBstory building and 2000 feet wide Pravda said million cubic feet of water have built up be hind the slide which on Friday formed a huge natural dam It said the water level behind dam rose more than 105feet in 50 hours t The Soviet news agency Tass said an attempt would be made to divert the blocked fastris ing river and remove the threat oc of bluetiled old mosques an new industries It is 1700 mile southeast of Moscow near th juncture of the Soviet Union Red China and Afghanistan Tass said the landslide curred Friday when the Darn vorz Mountain cracked as result of earth tremors am was cut in two by The huge mass of earth am rock fell into the river swollen by a month of heavy rams anc the slide formed a natural dam A lake is forming 100 mile upstream rrora Samarkand city of 215000 persons but th earth dam threatens to break and unleash a raginf torrent North Iowa Weather outlook Mewtty ctewdr scat tered showers end thunder storms Monday in mid fertty cloudy TMOS dey of scattered JOS Weather details on MOR6 TO BRITAIN LONDON W Prime Minft ter Aldo More of Italy arrived in London Monday for talks with Prime Minister Sir Alec Doug las Home on trade and tent c T Top court refuses to hear train case Four railroad operating un ions attacked the ruling jn two appeals Mondays decision means that the boards ruling stands The railroads declined com ment on the decision except to point out that under the agree ment with the unions the arbi tration award will go into ef fect May days after the final court decision Only firemen will be affected directly because the local bar gaining machinery involving other train crewmen already has been set in motion The issues theunions raised were separate from those in the prolonged rail labor dispute in which President Johnson an nounced April 22 that an agree ment had been worked out The newspaper that mokes all North lowans neighbors MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE Home Edition VOL 104 MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY APRIL 27 1944 UOe a Paper of Four SectionsSection One Associated Press Full Leased No 66 Cyprus trouble persists NICOSIA Cyprus AP itmdred Greek Cypriot irregu ars armed with mortars and machineguns threatened the embattled village of Ayio Thoi doros Monday as UN officials sought to remove the villages 800 Turkish Cypriots New fighting flared Monday morning in the mixed Greek Turkish village 30 miles south of NicosiavUN troops tried to set up a ceasefire A showdown also appeared to beshaping up for control ol strategic Kyrenia Pass where Greek Cypriot forces pinned down Turkish defenders dug in medieval St Hilarion Greek Cypriott felt out Turk ish positions with mortar ma chinegun and rifle fire They denied however that they were tryingto hitthe castle which the Turkish Cypriots use as their strongpoint in controlling the pass along the KyreniaNic osia road The Turks caught by surprise when the attack opened Satur day cannot lose much more ground without surrendering control of the pass Greek Cyp riot forces have advanced to within a mile of this highway between the capital and the north coast No road deaths in state over the weekend DBS MOINES AP The State Safety Department said Monday that for the first time in two years Iowa went through a weekend without a traffic death The past weekends death free period was the first sirice Jan 2628 1962 the depart ment said SAME MR K BEN BELLA Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev Photofax Leonid Brezhnev arid seated next to JLJCV1I1U CU1U SCilLcLl J1CAL LU left sits across the table from Algeri him isAnastas Mikoyan Russian dep an President Ahmed Ben Bella during uty premier At far end of the table on their conference in the Kremlin Seated next to Khrushchev is Soviet President the left side isSoyiet Foreign Minister Andrei Grpmyko rains pass across t By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Thunderstorms locally heavy raingusty winds and a tornado passed across Iowa Sunday night v The tornado touched down on three Wright County farms 8M miles south of Clarion Buildings on three farms were destroyed or damaged There were no in juries Two inches or more of rain fell at some places and oneinch rainfair was commonplace Hail and lightning also were report ed The t e r n ado materialized about midnight and hit the farms of Marvin HilpipreMrs Gary Snitselaar and Carroll Martin Mrs Hilpipre said that be fore she and her husband could get their two children downr stairs from second floor bed rooms the storm had passed Two buildings were destroyed and all other buildings on the farm received some damage Hilpipre said Oh the Mrs Snitselaar farm occupied and Mrs George Mourian a well house was destroyed A window of the house was sucked out and a picture of the Mourlans daugh tersitting on the window sill wag blown a quarter of a mile away Mrs Gail Cundell Clarion said the tornado cloud passed byeithe town afterhitting the farms It sounded like a freight train as it passed over us she said x Among the heaviest rainfall amounts reported were Dickens 261 Pocahontas 245 Ogden 220 Algona Holly Springs and Kennebec 210 Estherville and Audubon 2 Other rainfall amounts includ ed Curlew 194 Graettinger 139 Waterloo 191 Williams 188 Milford 184 Marathon 183 At lantic Exira and Gillett Grove Boone179 Iowa Falls 178 Harlan and Clarion 173 Steam boat Rock 170 Fort Dodge 166 Jefferson 162 Akron 16o Buckeye 155 Okoboji 154 and Haverhill 152 Skies generally were clear over Iowa Monday but more moisture was expected Monday night Lightning apparently started a fire which destroyed a barn on the Jim Cody farm nearBur in KossutH County Cody was in the barn at the time but was not hurt Livestock in the barn were saved Drier air moved into the state after the storm activity anc high temperatures Monday should be slightly below Sun days range of 77 at Ottumwa and Burlington to 67 at Spencer Low readings early Monday varied from 48 at Des Moines to 54 at Lamoni Lows Monday night should be in the 40s Partly cloudy skies and chance of more showers are forecast for Tuesday The Supreme Courts refusal d review was announced ini s def order which gave no reas ons The order rioted that Jus ce Arthur J Goldberg former ecretary of labor took no part n the case No immediate strike threat as involved in Hhe appeals to le Supreme Court v The appeals concerned two rime vfork rule questions On lese questions the arbitration aarq1 said the railroads could iiminate up to 90riper cent of he 33000 firemens jobs on and yard diesel locomo ves and could negotiate locally or the elimination of up to 18 OO other crewmen Rail man gement contends the firemen re no longer needed on modern iesels The dispute in which President ohnson intervened concerned ay scales interdivisional runs ombination of road and yard ork extra holidays layover xpenses and the like The appeals to the Supremo lourt developed from action of Congress in August 1963 when created a special arbitration ward to head off a strike then hreatened The boards ruling affecting reight and yard firemen and ther crewmen left about 200 railroads free to begin on larch 2 1964 the reduction of irerhens jobs However the ailroads delayed such action ending outcome of court ap peals The four rail attacked he arbitration boardin suits in ederal courts here but the US of Appeals on1 Feb 20 964upheld the boards rulings The court of appeals rejected ontentions that the congression tl act was unconstitutional and hat the arbitration board ex eeded is authority Three of the unions in a joint tppeal to the Supreme Court re peated the contentions and also aid a special threejudge US District Court should have been et up to rule on the question of onstitutionality of the congres ional action Court to rule on Johnson may expand Republican briefings WASHINGTON AP Pres erally mentioned presidenlia Johnson is reported connomination possibilities on wha sidering expanding his proposed course the United States is fo foreign policy briefings of preslowing and what actions it i idential aspirants to include taking on various world prob nominees ior the House and Senate Johnson has offered to have Trees were blown down and the Central Intelligence Agency outbuildings damaged on the and the Defense and State de Martin farm partments background all gen Stacked rockets Jo send up giant pay loads SUNNYVALE Calif AP Unprecedented 100000 pound payloads soon can hurled into orbit by massproduced solid rocket motors locked into clusters says an aerospace ex pertv Such loads would be seven times greater than the heaviest the Russians have been known to orbit Cylinders of rocket power stacked like tomatocans will be able to loft the 50 tons of useful cargo within three years Bar net R Adelman president of United Technology Center a di vision of United Aircraft Corp predicts The center is already produc ing segmented rockets for the Titan IIIC which the Air Force expects to be a workhorse booster for the next decade of A pair of fivesegment motors on the Titan IIIC will provide more than two million pounds of liftoff thrust The vehicle is scheduled for its first flight tests in 1965 Each steeljacketed segment of the firststage booster is 10 feet in diameter and weighs about SO tons when filled wHh rubbery fuel Clustering rockets isnt a new idea Last year the center test fired a cluster of 24 smaller solidfuel segments four six motor stacks Anchored to the test pad it produced 140000 pounds of thrust during a 14 sccond burning time The superlauncher would be as tall as a 26story building and weigh more than seven million pounds It would cost substantially less than a launch vehicle of the same payload capacity using an allliquid propcllant Adelman says lems Sen Barry Goldwater R Ariz a leading candidate fo the GOP presidential nomina tion rejected this out of hand Some others have acceptec including New Yorks Gov Ne son A Rockefeller But Rod cfeller said he would accep only with the understandin that the briefings would not ti his hands in future public de bate on foreign policy and n tional security Goldwater called Johnsons o fer an offhand political gcs lure and said it was basicaU unwise to provide this inform tion to any other than the aclu presidential nominee Sen Warren G Magnuson DWash chairman of the Dem ocratic senatorial campaig committee said there had bee discussion of making such brie ings available for senatorial an House nominees Presumably this iriformatio would be similar to the full ac of the existing intemation al situation which Secretary c Stale Dean Rusk said would b given lo presidential aspirant who desire it race law WASHINGTON Supreme Court agreed Monday 0 rule on validity of aws prohibiting marriages bev r ween Negroes and whitesuThe aws also make it a crimefpra Negro man arid white woman or white man and Negro woman o habitually occupy the room at night The ruling was asked by Dew ey McLaughlin described as a Negro and Connie Hoffman a white woman who arrest ed in Miami Beach in February 1962 Each was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fine after conviction of living in the samaj room Counsel for the National Asi sociation for tiie Advancement of Colored People in a brief on ichalf of the defendants argued iheir conviction violated federal guarantees of equal protection and due process of law A Florida welfare worker tes tified at trial of the two that the white woman staled she began living vvith McLaughlinas her common law husband in 1961 but had never had a formal marriage to him The Florida law under which the two were convicted bars living together by persons of different races who are not married to each other The ap peal of the two persons said their case raised the question whether a stale can forbid par lies from contracting a lawful marriage within the state be cause of their race and then convict the same parties for en tering into unlawful cohabita tion Inside The Globe Editorials 4 Comics Clear Lake news 11 Sports news 15U Bowling news 17 Society news UMt North owe news 21 Latest markets tj Meson City news 2221 Transit timetable 14   

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