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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 1, 1963 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 1, 1963, Mason City, Iowa                             i ort Diem o WlftE tBBVtCBa TOKYO A military revolt in Saigon Friday President Ngo Dinh Diem and wae an unconfirmed report that he has been ousted A high as military source In Tokyo said he had but could not story that Diem was deposed and his adviserbrother Ngo Dinh Nhu killed by dissident SouthViet namese Heavy fighting was reported around Diems yellow stucco palace Marines in battle dress jurrounded the national police headquarters in Saigon and took over outlying police stations apparently without resistance BULLETIN The figMinf erupted at Sal Cons luncheon and siesta hour A half dozen highflying planes drew fire from antiair craft batteries near navy head quarters and from troops in the but there was no con firmation that any were hit There was scattered firing throughout the city In Washington President Kennedy summoned his top mil itary and diplomatic advisers to the White House to assess the situation US officials in Washington called it a coup of real pro portions that appeared to be moving fairly far though there still was no way of knowing whether it would be successful However the Pentagon order ed US forces in the Pacific to start moving toward South Viet Nam to protect American lives if Necessary A qualified source said top military figures though not nec essarily all of them headed the rebel movement Most communications from Saigon to tfie outside world were cut off US Ambassador Henry Cab ot Lodge representing a war ally of South Viet Nam critical of Diems strongarm actions against Buddhist and student opposition leaders saw Diem shortly before the shooting started Lodge originally had planned dor to the presidential palace for the talk with Diem was DIEM to leave Saigon Thursday for consultations in Washington He disclosed Wednesday he was postponing his departure until Saturday Accompanying the ambassa Adm Harry D7 Felt command er of US Pacific forces who was returning from a meeting of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization at Bangkok Thai land Exactly the Unbacked armed forces were split was not immediately apparent but South Koreas embassy report ed to Seoul that members of tfie 7th Marine Division and some army troops touched off the up rising The Korean report said ma rines in addition to occupying the national police headquar ters took over the government radio station navy headquar ters arid the international tele graph office Diems ambassadordesignate in Washington Do Vang Ly ex pressed deep concern at reports of the revolt He said the fight ing coming ontop of govfcsP ment reverses afield in the few days might munist guerrillas opportunity to build themselves up again in South Viet Nam Lys predecessor former Am bassador Tran Van Choung de clared in Boston the reports came as no surprise to me I have known for a long time of the deep discontentof the whole population of Viet Nam Choung said The former ambassador a illed Confucionist is the father o Mrs Ngo DM Nhu Diems sis terinlaw and Viet Nams First Lady She nowis in Los Angel es at the windup of a tour of the United States to explain the governments position in the politicalreligious crisis Mrs Nhu said that If press reports of a revolt in Viet Nam are true it is a great shame to many Americans She said Indeed we all know many of them Ameri cans wanted this for a long time Now that victory was com ing for us they thought they could rob us of the real fruits of that victory with the help of little men who are traitors No foreign interference can be tolerated in our country WASHINOTOHl Statn Friday emphat Ically denied that H had any thing to do with tKe military coup in South Viet Nm VOL I The newspaper that makes all Korth I owans neighbors CITY GLOBEGAZETTE Home Edition Frew SAd United Prew International full Leuc MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY NOVEMBER 1 1943 10c a Paper Consists ol Two SectionsSection One No 228 Ice show blast kills Nursing refuse Turn down state offer DES MOINES bers of the Iowa Nursing Home Association iwere on record Fri T gnder programfor medical aidJdthe R J executive secretary of the said the door has not been closed on further negotiation before the joint federal state program becomes effective in Iowa scheduled for Dec 1 Lawrence Putney of the State Board ofSocra Welfare said earlier this no change is contemplated1in the nursing care rate the boarc fixed previously Members of the association operate 187 nursing homes Ef fect of the groups decision is that no MAA patients will be accepted at the rate which a spokesman saidwoulc INDIANAPOLIS UP Those who lived through it told the story Policeman Jack Ohrburg Its the first time Ive ever had 3yearold girl die in my a r rri s crying Daddy Daddy In my arms Drying Richard Crowefj 20 college student who dragged his girl friend from the rubble and struggled towa rds s a t y There was a popcorn concts sion stand beneath us over us I carried Karol I could see people screaming and running Legs and arms were sticking out of the rub ble On the way out we had to cross people I believe were dead One man had His head sticking in the flames John Williams Columbus Ohio a member of the com pany of Holiday On No performers were hurt but some were knocked off their feet from the impact Fire and flame followed immediately People ran onto the ice They didnt know what to do they were slipping on the ice The fpeople were just like cattle They came across the ice and got out of there Police Chief Robert Reilly I thought 1 had seen death but 1 guess I was wrong I dont care if you have seen five wars not allow nursing Jsreak even homes to The MAA program under the federal rKerrMills Act is for persons oyer6S who have limit ed means but are not on assis tance rolls The state had no yardstick to know how many would go into nursing homes Iowa will have about mil lion available for such medical care Quackenbush said the State Welfare Department has agreed to allow the usual and custo mary fees charged by doctors dentists and hospitals and the same should be allowed nurs ing homes Seeks million for lung cancer MIAMI Fla Leo A McGraw 52 seeks damages from the R J Reyn olds Tobacco Co on a conten tion that he contracted lung cancer from the firms cigar ettes McGraw filed suit Thursday alleging that the tobacco com panys advertising matter in dicated the cigarettes were harmless but that actually ihsy were not The plaintiff said he smoked the companys cigarettes for 30 years at the rate of three packs a day He contended the cigarettes gave him lung can cer in 1962 and part of one lung was removed BODIES ONi ICE Bodies of victims are covered on the ice following explo sion that killed scores at Indiana State Fairgrounds Coliseum new type space machine MOSCOW AP The Soviet Union announced Friday it has launched a space ship into orbit which can maneuver in all di rections changing its orbit both sidewise and in height The announcement said the apparatus is called Polyot One Polyot means flight The ship apparently is un manned but contains a mass of control mechanisms which pership can maneuver in all di mit it to maneuver in such a manner that if desired it could be moved alongside another craft in space Such a project has been planned not only by the Soviet Union but by the United States The announcement given over Moscow Radio said the JFK doubts Russians quit moon race WASHINGTON AP Pres dent Kennedy has questioned whether the Soviet Union is abandoning the moon race Kennedy told a news confer ence Thursday that he would not make any betj at all upon Soviet intentions despite Pre mier Khrushchevs statement hat his country would not race to the moon but rather would profit from American experi ence in that field I think that our experience has been that we wait for deeds unless we have a system of verification and we have no dea whether the Soviet Union is going to make a race for the North Weather outlook Fair ttirevgh Saturday CoW iui me east Friday IImoon or whether it is going to 4 m attfilYlDt an PVOn Saturday hiohs in Weather on 2 attempt an even greater pro gram the President said I think we ought to stay with our program I think that is the best answer to Mr Khrush chev Discussing Soviet space ef said he could not read into Khrushchevs statement at a Moscow news conference last Saturday any announcement that the Soviets are abandoning their moon pro gram Instead the President con cluded that Khrushchev was saying the Soviets would not go to the moon without adequate point on which he voiced agreement The fact of the matter is that the Soviets have made an intensive effort in space and thereis every indication that they are continuing and that they have the potential to con Kennedy said rections Atone stage it flew with a maximum height of 592 kilome ters miles and a mini mum altitude of 343 kilometers 211 On several occasions during its flight it was called on to transmit data to listening sta tions in the Soviet Union Its performance was described as normal Moscow Radio described it as an important step for further study and exploration of the cosmos The purpose of maneuvering two ships together is to get a big enough mass into orbit to serve as a launching pad for a subsequent ship to some distant cosmic body such athe moon Several of the Soviet and American space ships launched into orbit have had a limited amount of maneuverability but not enough either to swing la terally intr totally different or bits around the earth or to choose a higher or lower orbit The operations wnich are carried out a Soviet communi que said will help to solve the problem of guiding spaceships in flight directing them into the preset areas for receiving scientific information connected with cosmic exploration attack AMERICUS Three federal judges in a split deci sion granted an injunction against prosecution of major charges under inte gration leaders have bflen held in jaiL nearly three months Striking down two Georgia laws as unconstitutional two of he judges concurred in an in junction order which cleared he way for the prisoners to be released on bond within limits prescribed by the ruling Juclge Elbert P Tuttle chief judge of the 5th US Circuit Court of Appeals and District Judge Lewis R Morgan gave he majority opinion which lim ited bond to on each mis demeanor charge and on felony charges In a dissenting Dis trict Judge J Robert Elliott said a federal court should nev er enjoin actions by state courts and that constitutionality of the laws involved could be deter mined in the criminal proceed ings The ruling held that Georgias 1871 insurrection statute and un lawful assembly law are uncon stitutional Tuttle and Morgan concurred in an injunction against further prosecution of charges under those statutes Inside The Globe FOOD CAUSED riot at Anamosa Page 2 PARK acquisition poses budget problem Page 6 Editorials 4 Clear Lake news I S Mason City news 47 Latest markets 7 Society news 99 Sports newi 1112 Television news 1314 Classified pages 1819 North Iowa news20 385 a re hurt in tragedy Blamed on escaped gas INDIANAPOLIS gas explosion hurled flames and concrete slabs as large as pi anos through a fcrowd watching show finale Thursday Jtming and injuring INJURED CONSOLED A woman pinned under a section of concrete bleachers is consoled byan uncnarred identified man himself injured following grounds coliseum It was the second explosion disastgxviib Ihe United States within a fewhours Seven died and r25 were injured in a mys terious explosion which shat tered a drug store in Marietta Ga Thursday night See story on page 2i More than nine hours after the 10 pm CST Indianapolis blast authorities from miles around Indianapolis sorted the dead and dying The Red Cross coroners of fice and Civil Defense agreed on the 62 dead figure afterthor ough checks of the six hospitals three improvised morgues and numerous funeral homes where bodies were taken The injured number which 176 remained hospital ized many in critical condi tion Many victims were leaping spouts of or rushed tura Algerians attack Moroccan village REPEATER BOONE UPI Stephen C Nelson 21 rural Boone was aay to deposit an out the of a wmivwoon Clty intersection here It HOLLYWOOD m Henry was the second year in a row aVhf as frustrated by tor died Thursday of a heart police as he tried to pull the same Halloween prank RABAT Morocco Hassan II said Algerian forces attacked the Moroccan town of Figuig in Friday and he has ordered his troops to with draw At a news conference at the royal palace the somber king announced Morocco would not fight back He said his government will abide by a pledge made Wednesday in Mali to cease hostilities and seek a negotiated solution to the frontier problem with Algeria A ceasefire in the frontier war is scheduled to be gin at midnight Friday Figuig a town of about 8000 inhabitants is several miles in side Moroccan territory in northeastern Morocco The de fined and agreedupon part of the MoroccanAlgerian frontier ends south of Figuig The king said he has in formed the UN secretarygen eral the International Red Cross and the Organization of African Unity about the attack Bitterly he stressed that Fi guig at no time figured in the dispute over the border It is unthinkable that new fratricidal fighting should take place in an area which has nev er been contested he said Morocco does not Intend to the king said I will maintain the Bamako agreement Morocco will follow a policy of peace Under a ceasefire negotiat ed by Hassan and Algerian President Ahmed Ben Bella both nations forces are to be withdrawn from a large demili tarized zone But Algerian and Moroccan officers meeting with officers from Ethiopia and Mali still have to negotiate the limits of the demilitarized zone And neither government has given any indication of a retreat in its territorial claims V SAME White Menu Faii U explosion One of six Holiday on Ice troupes now touring was just winding up its show when the blast took place Star perform ers were off stage and a chorus was performing a gay Dixie land number when the Indiana polis Coliseum was transformed into a scene of horror Bodies many still wrapped in mink erupted onto the ice Many others were trapped in tumbling slabs of concrete and shattered bleachertype seats Fire marshals at midmorning placed the blame in the trage dy on a leaking tank of liqui fied petroleum flas being used to heat popcorn poppers under the shattered section No 13 After the blast the bodies sprawled grotesquely all over the ice the victims color ful openingnight clothing con trasting strakly with the frozen white surface Crimson pools pockmarked the ice where the explosions grim debris lay Moments before skaters had glided across the ice to the Dixieland jazz of the finale to the show The Halloween night opening had brought many of In dianapolis fashionable to State Fairgrounds Coliseum Then they were dead Sa many Huge slabs of concrete rose straight up under the seats and smashed down ou the bleacher occupants A horrified spectator told of 3LAST turn to   

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