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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 18, 1963 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 18, 1963, Mason City, Iowa                             Iowas Daily Newspaper for Home t ntwtpoper that mokes all North lowans neighbors VOL 113 Home Edition AtsocitUd Prtw tad United Fun MASON CITY IOWA WIDNISDAY SEPTEMBER 11 1943 10c Paper Consists of Four No IN 28 killed in California bustrain wreck SALINAS Calif speed ing freight train shattered a makeshift bus jammed with Mexi can field workers Tuesday kill ing 28 and injuring 35 in the worst vehicle accident in California his tory Bodies were strewn for half a mile along both sides of the track crash at a farm road crossing near the town of Chualar eight miles south of Sal inas Bodies just flew all over the place said Tony Vasquez 29 He was working in a nearby lettuce field and saw the converted truck ripped into pieces Vasquez called the California Highway Patrol and then went back to do what he could Two of those men died in my arms he said One body was hooked under the engine said Coroner Chris topher Hill Jr Shoes hats and Bthe sheet makeshift bus jammed with Mexican field workers is draped around frontof a Southern Pacific freight locomotive after crash at a farm road crossing near town of Chualar eight milessouth of Salinas The crash killed 28 and injured 35 in Californias worst vehicle accident Nursing homes oppose flat fee 1 ii MONTICELLO Iqwa tf Secretary of Agricul ture Orville L Freeman said Wednesday the govern ment svoluntary feed grain program mil cost a lot of money for an indefinite period if it is continued But he said it will be less than the cost of some other approaches And he steered clear of any direct argument for the istration idea that the anbillion dollars a year for pay j DBS MOINES Iowa Nursing Association was oh record Wednesday in opposition to the states decision to set a Hat daily fe4 for care of patients re ceiving help under the new Med ical Aid to the Aged program The association representing about 40 per cent ofthe nursing homes in Iowa has advised its members not to Accept the daily fee of per patient fixed by the StateBoard ofSocial Welfare W E Kyle of Waterloo past president of the association and its representative on the Iowa MAA Advisory Council said nurs ing homes shouldhave the right to charge medicalcare patients the same as the rdp has agreed to allow doctors osteopaths and druggists tot make the customary and usu al charges for their professional services x 1 Xyle in a letter to the welfare boarcLsaid the a day rate makes no Distinction between a nursing home convalescent need inga few services and one requir ing care performed around the clock by professional personnel The MAA program for medical aid to persons over 65 in the low income group is expected to start in Iowa around Dec 1 The ap propriation made by the 1963 leg islature and funds the state will get from the federal government provide about million a year ST JOSEPH Mo UPI finance the cost The Armour and Co meat pack How far this will go toward ing plant laid off 72 workers I meeting total heeds has not been Tuesday bringing to 440 because it is not def number ofemployes within the past 10 days The layoffs began after a threeway dispute developed over a new labor contract call ing for a production increase of 125 per cent at the plant hits 440 known how many eligible persons will apply for help The program is entirely sepa rate from the old age assistance program and sets a limit of 180 days on the length of time an MAA patient can be cared for in a nursing home On the other hand O mw UL11V1 IJdJlU Plant officials said those disold age assistance recipients are Jmssed Tuesday were from varlong term patients in nursing lous departments in the plant homes Most of the previous layoffs Kyle asked the state board to m t the fhog reconsider the a day rate for MAA patients but Board Chair man Lawrence Putney said he doubted this could be done Treaty vote set Tuesday WASHINGTON The Senateagreed Wednesday to vote next Tuesday at 9 am on the question of ratification of the limited nuclear test ban treaty Under the unanimous con sent agreement votes on res ervations understandings and similar matters will be taken Monday Debate on these will be limited to one hour each during Mondays session and beef killing departments Officials of Ldcal 58 United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers International negotiat ed a new contract last Aug 4 calling for the increased pro duction at the plant Employes at first accepted the contract then rejected it after the international union said the local had no authority to nego tiate such a contract The company claimed how ever that the new contract was valid and that employes refus ing to work under terms of the increased production contract be suspended 2 killed at Grinnell GRINNELL UPI Two persons were killed Wednesday when a car and a semitrailer truck collided at an intersection about 7 miles east of here The victims were identified as Earl Mintle 67 Grinnell and Iver Iverson 72 Longmont Colo North Iowa Weather outlook Partly cloudy Showers Wad nesday night and Thursday Lows Wednesday in 63s Hiflh Thursday in Ms Weather details en Page 2 cutting knives were all around Everywhere you could hear the injured moaning Twentytwo died by the tracks Others died as 15 ambulances rushed them to three Salinas hos pitals The workers were returning from a celery field to the Earl Meyers Co labor camp near Sa linas 100 miles south of San Francisco They rode onfour board bench es running lengthwise on the fiat bed truck Francisco Gonzales Espinosa 34 of Salinas the driver said he stopped at the crossing and looked to his right Highway Patrol Capt Francis Simmons said Espinosa declared he did not hear orsee the train until the front wheels were on the track Engineer Robert E Gripe of San Luis Obispo said he blasted the Southern Pacific locomotives whistle when he saw the biw stopped at the crossing Astonished and shocked Cripa saw the bus move onto the tracks Before he could slow his train of 70 sugar beet gondola cars roll ing at 50 miles an hour the en gine hurtled into the midst of the jammed workers A highway patrol spokesman saidEspinosa was held on an open charge of felony manslaugh ter bid to oust Afri woos swer lies in tight manda tory controls The cost Freeman said will duction be perhaps three quarters of a ment to farmers holding un needed grain land out of pro In a talk prepared for a farm meeting here he said that once the surplus is gone we can spend less than we have been spending and far less than some other approaches would cost But the feed grain pro gram will still cost a lot of money The meeting was one of a se ries Freeman has scheduled for the late summer gei farmers ideas on future gov rtfit i A r ml BOB NADEN Naden announces candidacy Bob Naden Webster City an nounced Wednesday he is a candidate for the Republican nomination for Lt Gov INaden has representedHam ilton County forgive terms in the Iowa General Assembly where he served as Majority FloorLeader in the 1961 ses sion and Speaker of the House of Representatives Naden describes himself as a moderate conservative He be lieves that excessive govern mental regulation is detrimen tal to the economic progress of our state and nation He favors the broadening of the local school tax base in or der to relieve the property tax burden Naden was born in Osage but has lived all but his first two years in Webster City Elected Speaker at the age of 41 he is one of the younger men to hold this office His wife is the former Dorothy Rus sell of Webster City The Nadens are the parents of a son and three daughters He is active in the MethodistChurch and is a member of Kiwanis Masons OES Izaak Walton and the American Legion j meetings a series of events grower ref and congressional deci sions rejecting the Kennedy administrations program of tighter farm commodity supply controls Freeman appeared to imply however that continued heavy outlays for voluntary farm pro grams may run into urban op position From where I sit I realize that there is a limit to what we can spend for farm programs ernment policies The rfASSof ham AIa Seated i ifn old Negro identified sister and parents Mr and girl killed m a church bomhincr u girl killed in a church attend graveside services for her in Birming AlvinJlobertson Sr Others un identified ca Agenda has hot issues BULLETIN UNITED NATIONS N Y The U Ns powerful Steering Committee recom mended Wednesday that the assembly consider two eon troversial UN mem bership for Communist China and treatment of Buddhists in South Viet Nam UNITED NATIONS NY AP United Nations com mittee asked the General As sembly and the Security Council Wednesday to consider expelling South Africa at once from the world organization for its policy of rigid racial segregation called on to South s Africa5 suggested by the as semblyflast yearv These include roes BIRMINGHAM Ala mid the funeral Wednesday for hree victims of a church bbmb V victims or a cnurcn bomb said Farmers deserve and erand already memorial servic can expect fair treatment but we deal with an urban society a Congress made up in creasingly of city congress men The administration has con tended that effective supply con trol programs would cost the government much less than the voluntary ones Bulletin JAKARTA Indonesia UPI law was imposed in Jakarta Wednesday in the face of widespread violence by roving Indonesian mobs which sacked and burned the British Embassy against the new Malaysia in protest nation of es for thefour Negro girlskilled by the explosion are being organ ized over the country The funeral for one of the girls Carole Rosamond Robertson 14 was held Tuesday with hundreds of persons some white paying silenttribute before she was bur ied in the red clay beneath cedar r National Negro leaders includ ing Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People were enroute to join in tribute to Denise Mc Nairill andAddie Mae Collins and Cynthia Wesley both 14 In Congress a resolution asked President Kennedy to set aside next Sunday the 101st anni versary of Abraham Lincolns Emancipation Proclamation an a day of mourn ing for the four girls The Congress of Racial Equali ty in New York asked 100 of its chapters to observe mourning Sunday and the 10 chairmen of last months march on Washington asked all Americans to do the same Wilkins NAACP executive sec retary was to be joined at the afternoonfuneral by Dr Martin Luther King Jr of Atlanta presi dent of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Bayard Rustin deputy director of the Washington march Fred L Shut tlesworth president of the Ala bama Christian Movement for Human Rights and others prom inent inthe integration fight In Washington assistant Senate majority leader Hubert H Hum phrey DMinn and other sena tors asked the President to pro claim Sunday a day of national observance in memory of these children and a day of rededica tion in this nation to the princi ples of law equality and toler ance Humphrey said Southern lead he called the Southern a calculat Assails farmers 5 OF MANY GIFTS FOR QUINTS STORY AND PICTURE PAGE 2 Pholofax edpolicyof enforcing inequality and segregation on Negroes to further their own economic inter est The Alabama congressional del egation said in a statementthat the church bombing was a heartless criminal atrocity and a blot on the name of our fair state The killed Sun day morning when a dynamite blast rocked the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church during Sunday School Twentythree other per sons were injured Later in the day two Negro boys were shot to death as racial feeling here increased sharply Inside The Globe INFjVNT KILLER remains a mystery Page 2 QUINTS STILL doing well mom misses other 5 Page 2 NORTH IOWANS organ ize to boost area Page 33 Editorial 4 Society news g9 North Iowa news 18 Sports news 2122 Clear Lake news 2627 Mason City news 3233 Classified pages 3839 Khrushchev angere MOSCOW AP Angry over another poor harvest Soviet Pre mier Khrushchev has berated farmers for inefficiency and as sailed bureaucrats for exporting fertilizer when it is needed for Soviet felds We export mineral fertilizers because our economists havent learned yet to calculate realisti cally what this costs he told a farm meeting in merly Stalingrad If they calculated then they would see that it would be better to put a ton of these fertilizers in the erth It would be more eco nomical to export the grain re ceived than mineral fertilizers And only after we fuily sat isfied our domestic needs for an v embargo ah end J foreign investment in South Africa The 11nafion special of Asianj African and Latiri Americarihations established ast year tdreviewiSouth Africas acial policies Its report was ubmitted to the assembly shortly before the UNs Steering Com nittee met to draw up an agenda for the 18th General Assembly session African racial quarrels took top billing along the Buddhist conflict in South Viet Nam and the question of Red Chinese ad mission to membership The assembly opened Tuesday on a spark of hope generated by the limited nuclear testban trea ty But the first meeting was full of surprises Albania black sheep of the So yiet flock seized the initiative and issued a surprise call for assem bly debate on giving Red China the UN seat held by National ist China The Soviet Union had been ex pected to make the proposal de spile its ideological dispute with Peking The Russians made clear how ever they will support the de mand for seating Red China even though it came from Albania Pe kings ally in the party dispute Outcome of the China debate is expected to follow last years pat tern when the assembly rejected a Soviet proposal to oust Formo sa and seat Peking The vote was 56 to 42 with 12 abstentions The opening meeting usually a routine ceremony devoted to the election of an assembly president and other officers was jolted when 11 young demonstrators bitrst into the hall shouting run ning down the aisles and scatter ing antiCastro pamphlets Soma got to the front of the speakers platform before they were col lared and ushered out of the chamber Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A Gromyko US Ambassador Ad lai E Stevenson and other lead ing diplomats attended the glitter ing opening at which Carlos Rodriguez 51yearold lawyer from Venezuela was elected sembly president eral fertilizers can we then ex port them Khrushchev spoke after Cana da had signed a deal to sell 218 million bushels of wheat to the Soviet Union The So viet press and radio have not told the Russian people about the wheat deal made necessary by the failures Soviet agriculture Fertilizer always has been short because much of the Soviet econ omy is devoted to heavy industry But in his speech published Tues day in the Soviet press Khru shchev said farmers often ne glected to use the fertilizer they have Khrushchev said fields in Yugo slavia where he recently visited produce higher grain yields than Soviet fields because of the use of fertilizer Khrushchev clearly was in a sour mood when he addressed the farmers When one asked for addi tional irrigation pipes he snapped I didnt come to you from the supply section Pipe is not the question we ought to be occupying ourselves with now SAME   

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