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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, August 28, 1963 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 28, 1963, Mason City, Iowa                                Congress hopes to avert rail strike WASHINGTON AP High government sources expressed confidence Wednesday that Con gress will whip out legislation in time to avert a nationwide rail strike threatened for one minute after 10 pm CST Racing the clock the House takes up legislation ground out Tuesday night by the Senate even as carriers and unions prepared for the possibility of a massive walkout The measure would force arbi tration to settle the two big issues in the work rules dispute The elimination of 32000 firemens jobs and how many men are needed to run a train Under the Senate measure there would be 180 days for arbi trationnegotiations before a strike could ensue if the lesser issues were still unsettled Further con gressional action might be re quested then House leaders hoped to pass the measure and speed it to President Kennedy for signing before the strike deadline With the walkout threat just around the bend the Senate inched out the throttle beat down some other proposals and pushed through the emergency measure which is similar to one that had been drafted by the House Com merce Committee This is expected to simplify matters for leaders plan to have the House lake up the Senate bill as a substitute for its own version That way the House could pass the measure and send it straight to the White House rather than returning it to the Senate for final action Five operating unions represent ing the engineers firemen con ductors brakemen and switchmen have said they will strike I he moment the railroads put into effect the jobcutting new work rules Last month the carriers agreed to hold off on the new rules for 30 days to give Congress lime to act in the dispute With time running out the unions carriers and the govern ment began taking steps in case Congress could not beat the dead line In turning out its legislation Tuesday night by a 902 vote the Senate accepted a House plan to limit the legislation to only the two chief issues The original Senate resolution called for arbitration on all the other issues too The two senators voting against the measure were Wayne Morse DOre and John G Tower RTex North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the The newspopcr that makes all North I o w a n s n e i g h b o r s MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE Home Edition VOL 103 Associated Presi and United Press International Full Lease Wire MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY AUGUST 2t 10e poyntb Paper couiiti of Four SectionsSection Diem rakes US No SAIGON Viet Nam AP President Ngo Dinh Diems re gime charged Wednesday the US State Department has shown a profoundly unjust doubt in the government of South Viet Nam based on totally erroneous infor mation A government note referred to a State Department declaration of Aug 21 which deplored methods used by Vietnamese security forces against Buddhists on Aug 21 Pagodas throughout the na tion were raided and thousands of Buddhist monks and nuns were beaten shot or arrested The government of Viet Nam reaffirms its determination to continue its policy of conciliation toward the Buddhists the latest note said But it is also resolved tp unmask all political saboteurs hiding under various disguises The State Department declara tion was called prejudicial to the honor andprestige Viet Nam whichhas never broken its word to whomever it inade promises The note ujp declara tion by the mand in Saigon broadcast by the official Viet Nam press that high military officers persuaded Diem to impose martial law last week Charles City man hurt in plane crash CENTER CITY Minn Charles City man James Wright 40 escaped with minor cuts and bruises in the crash of a light plane ina schoolyard at nearby Linstrom 45 miles north of the Twin Cities Lost in rain and f o g g y weather Wright the pilot and Walter DroegemueUer 39 Bat tle Creek Mich an employe of the Oliver Corporation were forced to land the plane when the fuel supply ran low The plane cracked up as they attempted to land Both were treated at a hos pital and released Deputy Sheriff GfarifHolm quist said Wright told him they had started to fly back to low after attending the Minnesota State Fair in St Paul Tuesday but because of poor flying weather decided to turn back j Mooty wife reconciled DES MOINES OftA divorce suit against Lt Gov William Mooty was dismissed in Polk County District Court Tuesday by his wife Jean who in the suit filed last week had charged him with cruel and inhuman treatment Reached by telephone at his Grundy Center home Mooty said he and his wife were recon ciled by mutual agreement Sunday night and both of them are very happy about it Mrs Mooty who had been living in Des Moines returned to the Mooty home Sunday Washington crowd grows to 200000 THOUSANDS MARCH IN CAPITAL Pholofax 2 saved in mine blasf MOAB Utah crs Wednesday brought out the first two survivors of a potash mine blast that imprisoned 25 workers 3000 feet underground and were in the process of bringing at least five others to he surface The rescue team wearing oxygen masks to protect them from deadly carbon monoxide jas made contact with seven of the trapped men about 18 hours after a fiery explosion rocked the mine One of rescued workers North Iowa Weather outlook Decreasing cloudiness and cooler Wednesday night lows near 44 Generally fair and teeter Thursday Don Blake Hanna Price Utah said he was all right as he a m e to the surface in the bucket used to raise and lower men into the 2712 foot vertical shaft of the mine The other res cued man was Paul McKinney Moab The men were trapped in a Weather details en Page 2 H jtl d downward slanting drift off the bottom of the mine shaft be hind boulders which closed the drifts Both rescued men were taken to Moab Hospital They emerged from Ihe mine grimy and disheveled wearing pants and shoes Dut no shirts The fate ef tte ether II ers was not immediately on pages 2 and 3 They might have been killed in the explosion or possibly were trapped in another part of the mine which covers 80 acres in southeastern Utah The rescued men said they knew nothing of the fate of the others They reported that they had barricaded themselves be hind huge rocks after the ex plosion and awaited rescuers They said all seven were in good shape They said they yelled in uni son to make themselves heard when they became aware that rescue crews were in the mine shaft men all construction workers were trapped Tuesday afternoon when an explosion rocked the multimillion dollar potash facility in the ruggedly beautiful valley in the remote badlands of southeast Utah The blast occurred less than 24 hours after the dramatic res cue of two miners trapped for more than two weeks in the cavein of a coal mine at Sheppton Pa Their story ap WASHINGTON AP The great march on Washington a dramatic demand for jobs and equal freedoms for all Americans officially declared Wednes day to between 175 000 and 200000 demonstrators The estimate came from Chief of Police Robert V Murray in midafternoon of a day given over to a sometimes exuberant some times solemn demonstration tha the marchers climaxed with a pa rade to the shrine of Abraham Lincoln Packed elbow to elbow around the memorial they heard their leaders call for Congress to pass laws end all manner of racial discrimination and enable the un etaplbyecl v to find dignified work with decent wages It was a mixed and white young and old Chris tians and Jews Negroes predomi nated Josephine Baker the famous old Negro entertainer who has lived in Paris for many years looked down from the speakers platform at the crowd and called it salt and pepper just what it should be a united people Fight for your rights the rights of man she urged Con tinue on you cant go wrong Dr Ralph Bunche US Under secretary for political affairs in the United Nations secretariat said the presence of demonstra tors from both races was dra matic evidence that the problem of civil rights is a major one It was a jovial crowd crowd that cheered its leaders clapped for its entertainers and laughed at the jokes Yet there were religious tones not only from the presence of many clergymen of varying faiths but in the songs and reactions of the people themselves There were times when it seemed half prayer meeting and half revival meeting it was an orderly crowd In the early afternoon police reported there had been only two arrests one of demonstrators The march leaders met with Democratic and Republican lead ers of the Senate and House Sen ate Democratic leader Mike Mansfield of Montana said no commitments were asked or giv en in the session with him Roy Wiikins executive secre tary of the National Association Photofax REACHES TRAPPED MINERS Armond Roy left member of mine rescue squad returns to surface after an hour in the potash mine at Moab Utah after an explosion some 2700 feet below ground Man at right is not identified Roy was able to establish contact with 9 of 25 are be lieved to be scattered in one of two lateral tunnels extending from the base of the main shaft at the bottom of the mine Two men were In the late afternoon the march leaders had an engagement to see President Kennedy On the monument groundi there was a carnival atmos phere Here and there groups of bearded guitarplaying folk singers performed Soft drink and sandwich wagons were do ing business Women were sell ing brochures priced at en titled We Shall Overcome A striped canvas tent served as headquarters for the march MARCH turn to page 2 or the Advancement of Colored People CNAACP said Senate Re publican leader Everett M Dirk sen of Illinois pledged support for all o the administrations civil rights program except the pub lic accommodations bill This has been Dirksens position all along Wiikins said House GOP leader Charles Halleck of Indiana told them he was holding conferences on the legislation and the Re publican attitude always has been friendly to civil rights House Speaker John Mc Cormack DMass was quoted as predicting the House would pass a strong civil rights bill March aims at 10 main points WASHINGTON UPI Listed here arc the 10 dcmandi for government action which civil rights organizations sought to dramatize by Wednesdays march on Washington 1 Comprehensive and effective civil rights legislation without compromise or guarantee all Americans access to all public accommodations decent housing ade quate and integrated education and the right to 2 Withholding of federal from all programs in which discrimination exists 3 Desegregation of all school districts in 1943 4 Enforcement of the 14th con gressional representation of states where citizens are dis franchised 5 A new executive order banning discrimination in all housing supported by federal funds 6 Authority for the Attorney General to institute iniunc live suits when any constitutional right is violated 7 A massive federal prooram to train and place all un employed workers Negro and white on meaningful and dig mfied jobs at decent wages 8 A national minimum wage act that will give all Amer icans a decent standard of Jiving Minimum wage figure re quired would be per hour 9 A broadened fair labor standards act to include alt areas of employment which arc presently excluded 10 A federal fair employment practices act barring dis cnmmation by federal state and municipal and hv employers contractors employment agencies and trade Nearly all of the marchers requests are being considered by cither Congress or the Kennedy administration evident in cur provision about privately owned conccrning a hour Inside The Globe DRYS TAKE beating as three counties vote Page 2 THRHXF Torres u nowjlh Showers creep over Iowa in wide band r THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A wide band of thunderstorms moved c Highs Tuesday ranged from 69 degrees at Dubuque to 88 at tombs darkness cold nearly drove him to mad ness Page 3 REVEAL DAISIES will tell if given the chance Page 6 two inches of rain Amounts of an inch or more were common The rain ended over all but eastern Iowa Wednesday morn ing More showers were expected to develop mostly in the eastern counties Wednesday night Independence reported nearly 69 at Lamoni i i Lake news 24ZSGrimes at Waterloo Traer and SAME DATE1H2J71   

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