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Mason City Globe Gazette: Saturday, July 27, 1963 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 27, 1963, Mason City, Iowa                                North lowag Doily Newspaper newspaper that mokes ell North lowaits CITY GLOBEGAZETTE Home Edition VOL 1t3 tad Uaittd roll LCIM MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY JUtY V 1H3 Com oi Two No MS DOUBLE to keep up with her mother in leapover a ditch in Albanyy NY Dixie monthold beagle pup and the smallest of the litter didnt quite make it and broke her two front legs Children heard her crying and took her to a veter inarian who in casts Dixie has learned to hop around a kangaroo Rail nion rejectsbid WASHINGTON Firemens Union Satur day urged rejection of President Kennedys proposal for handling the dispute over jobcutting work rules on the railroads r It recommended instead a resumption of collective bargain ing under congressional direction and observation a pro posal put forth Friday by AFLCIO President George Meany H E Gilbert president of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen toldthe Senate Commerce committee that sufficient progress has been evident in collective bar gaming to warrant continuation of negotiations Kennedy seeking to avert a nationwide rail strike has pro posed that the Interstate Commerce Commission handle the rules dispute with power to cide on rules for twoyears un less the parties agree earlier But Gilbert like representa tives of the Engineers Brother hood Friday contended that re ferring the dispute to the ICC would a mount to compulsory arbitration Gilbert testified at an unusual Saturday session of the C6m merce Committee after Secre tary of tabor W WillardWirtz held conferences in his office Friday night with both sides of the dispute in another stab at working out an agreement Wirtzon hand to listen to Gil berts testimony told a report er that the negotiating efforts would be resumed after Satur days committee hearing ends But he said Fridaynight there is no basts for thinking at this point that the dispute can be settled outside legislation Wirtz called negotiators to gcther after the acting chairman of the Senate Commerce Commit tee Sen John Pastore DRI of fered to hold lip hearings for a week if the two sides thought this speed a settlement Although a union representative A F Zimmerman of the Brother hood of Locomotive Engineers said he doubted there was any hope for effective Wirtz took up Pastores kJea as an eminently sound suggestion Pressure on Congress to reach quick decision on Kennedys proposals has eased since the rail roads announced they would te lay new work rules until Aug 29 The unions say they will strike fbe minute the rules go into ef ItCt Tesf ban Victory for President WASHINGTON dent Kennedy Friday described the Big Three nuclear test ban agreement as a victory for mankind which has taker the world a step away from war This treaty is not the millen ium the President told the na tion in a televisionradio address reporting on the pact by the So viet Union Britain and the United States to ban nuclear tests in the atmosphere in space and under water He said the treaty will not reduce our need for arms or al lies or assistance to others But it is an important first step a step toward peace a step toward reason a step away from war the President said Kennedy declared that the treaty does not mean an end to the threat of nuclear war It will not reduce nuclear stockpiles he said It will not halt the production of nuclear weapons il will not restrict their use in time of war But he said that when the treaty was initialed Thursday a shaft of light cut into the darkness For the first lime an agree ment has been reached on bring Wont ing the forces of nuclear de struction under international control a goal first sought in 1916 when Bernard Baruch sub mitted our comprehensive plan to the members of the United Nations the President said Kennedy said the treaty is a turn to page 2 ii Pure Thurmond says of new antibias move FKOM OUR WIEE SERVICES WASHINGTON Sen Strom Thurmond DSC Saturday denounced blackmail in its raw est form a new antisegregation order by Defense Secretary Robert S McNamara Thurmond said McNamaras order authorizing military com manders to place entire communities off limits in cases of seri ous discrimination is preposterous The South Carolina Democrat member of the Senate Armed Services committee said in a statement that this would be not only to the local A a economy but also to individual Whopper lost after 33 hours COCOA BEACHSEla 15yearold boy hooked a pound jewfish and fought it for 33 hours straight before losing it their families defense pro early Saturday He galvanized the whole Yank jet fliers take the hint DIJON France AP Dear Sir We think your jet planes arc pretty but the noise hurts our ears We think you should make up for it by parachuting some candy to us That letter to the commander of a French air force base here was signed by 16 youngsters at tending a summer camp Friday a jet whistled over their camp and a small parachute floated to the earth Dangling be neath it was a fourpound box of candy Former director of Safety council dies YONKERS N Y John Stilwell 77 former president of the National Safety Council and brother of famed World War II commander the late Gen Jos eph W Vinegar Joe Stilwell died Friday in St Johns River side Hospital after a short ill ness Stilwell was president of the council from 1937 until 1942 North Iowa Weather outlook Clear tepartly cleudy Sat urday niftrt end Senday Scat tered shewert and tnvnder sterms west and ever SwieJey Cooler n e i fltwett Saturday in the Ms lew Wtafner detain ew town said Sgt Jack Kimsey who was on duty at the Patrick Air Force Base pier where the battle took place Almost 10000 people walked out to see him and give him encouragement Michael Douglas who gained some fame when he landed a 160 pound great white shark four days ago hooked into the giant jew fish at 3 pm Wednesday For the next day and a hajf he fought the fish almost constantly snack ing and catching an occasional nap when the battle reached a standstill But Ill tell you that man had a taut line almost all the time Kimsey said Mike reported he was keenly disappointed at losing the fish aft er such a long battle I wanted to much he said catch it Ive never let a fish go before and I was scared this one might be a record s c iconomy servicemen and and the entire gram Thurmond said the Ameri can people resent blackmail at the hands of government and are generally opposed to co ercion in any form If the order is rigidly en forced Thurmond said such South Carolinacities as Charles ton Columbia Surnter Beau fort and MyrtleBeach as well as bordering Augusta Ga and surroundingcpmmunities could be boycotted by Defense De partment McNamara said base command ers may declare off limits any area where Negro servicemen and their families are subjected to relentless discrimination The commanders first must get approval of the secretary of the service concerned McNamara voiced the hope that such sanctions never will have to be used The threat of ruling certain areas off limits to all troops could be a powerful economic weapon against segregation and discrimi nation in cities and towns that de pend heavily on military payrolls McNamara made the announce ment in reporting to President Kennedy the steps which have been taken on recommendations made by the Presidents Commit tee on Equal Opportunity in the Armed Forces McNamara also asked the mili tary services to give him a re port by Aug 15 on their plans for ord jewfish catch is about 550 of assistant secretary of pounds Fishing experts described for civil rights tvl LV Wn Lucii ior came much more than just catchcombatting discrimination and he ing a record fish The world recauthorized the creation of the post nit I 1 i f defense Mitsubishi Co is reassembled TOKYO UPI Japans giant Mitsubishi business com plex broken up by American officials at the end of World War II was reassembled Sat urday Directors of the three new companies which Gen Douglas MacArthurs advisers created out of the old prewar Mit subishi Heavy Industries Co agreed to a merger It will make Mitsubishi the largest business organization in Japan although its annual sales of million will still be less than that of the Hitachi Electric Corp Prewar Mitsu b i s h i was chopped up into three com panies by American occupa tion authorities They are known as New Mils u b i s h i Heavy Industries Co Mit subishi Shipbuilding and En gineering Co and Mitsubishi Nihon Heavy Industries Co The merger has been under negotiation for several years Before the war Mitsubishi was what is called in Japan a Zaibatsu a vast organiza tion that included production marketing banking and trad ing Its many sided financial structure often enabled it to crush competitors In many lines ot business Mitsubishi and its allies operated as cartels to control prices and distribution of goods Mitsubishi influence in Japanese affairs was enor mous and a major goal of postwar American reformers was to cut the big organization down to size The new company will be a powerful force in Japan al though it is unlikely to enjoy the status it had in prewar days The structure of Japanese industry has been greatly enlarged since the war with the rise of such firms as Matsushita the elec trical appliance maker and Honda the motor vehicle builder action ALL IS LOST BUT forlorn woman sits on a bench in front of her demolished home in Skopje Yugoslav hopelessness but la one of thousands demolished in the escaping with her life kl1LeiU1 I01 earthquake Her expression is one of Inside The Globe Church Features 45 Society News t North Iowa News 8 Sports 910 Editorials Hi Latest Markets 2 Mason City News 1213 Comics 14 Business News IS CUar Lake News U Work dispute at Cudahy plant OMAHA UPI Production halted Friday at the Cudahy Packing Co plant here A union spokesman said the workers walked off their jobs because they were asked to do work in violation of the con tract A company spokesman said several employes refused to perform assigned duties Thursday and were given three day suspensions In apparent protest to these suspensions the spokesman said employes in other de partments refused to work and this resulted in from 30 to 35 threeday suspensions Jackie to have a quiet birthday HYANNIS PORT M a s s Lady Jacqueline Kennedy celebrates her 34th birthday Sunday the way she likes little fuss and all her family around her President Kennedy was on hand to join in the quiet festivities for his wife who is expecting her third child In late August Uncover 600 quake dead SKOPJE Yugoslavia Debris of this quake ruined city slowly yielded the dead Saturday from the worst natural disaster in Yugoslavias history The governmentannounced 600 bodies had been recovered Rfd authorities estimated the toll may reach 2000 One city official expressed fear 6000 were dead More than 2000 injured were treated at field hospitals in and around the ruins of Skopje which was a Macedonian me iropolis of 270000 people and tourist center when the killer quake struck before dawn Fri day Four Americans who were in Skopje emerged unharmed They were Mr and Mrs Samuel Nocclla said this saved their and Mr and Mrs John Eobinec of Warren Mich All made their way safely to Belgrade US diplomatic authori ties were checking on reports that four persons from Boston Mass had been in the area but a spokesman said we havent had direct word about them Mr and Mrs N o c e 11 a a photographerwriter team had paused in Skopje on their way to Greece The Hotel Macedonia was booked fully when they ar rived Thursday night and its night clerk directed them to a nearby hotel the Jadran Mrs Nocella said this saved their lives for the quake collapsed ism He had proclaimed a week end of mourning His face set and grim Tito joined thousands of rescue work ers in sifting rubble for vic tims some killed outright by falling masonry and others buried alive Yugoslav army bulldozers and other earthmoving equip ment were used in the quest for victims The citys two biggest hotels the Macedonia and the Skopje were destroyed Fire at Pittsburgh finally controlled PITTSBURGH spectac ular fire at a chemical plant in a sprawling complex of chemical and gasoline manu facturing and storage firms on suburban Neville Island was Demos counting on GOP Fine print to be studied WASHINGTON AP Demo ratic leaders are counting on trong Republican backing to help vin Senate approval ot the nuclear est ban treaty Bill they dont ntend to try to rush il through The Scnale Democratic leader Wke Mansfield of Montana prom seel the Senate would move as expeditiously as possible But in an interview with The Associated Press he is a very important breakthrough in our efforts to lessen cold war tensions and we are not going to try to rush it through The Senate will be given time to consider the whole agreement including the fine print if any because the public has the greatest stake in this This will be an open agree ment openly arrived at The Moscow agreement banning all nuclear tests cxcppt under ground must be ratified by a two hirds vote of the Senate If all 00 Senators voted it would need 7 number of Demo Tats in the Senate But all Democrats may not vote Forthe pact and said Republicans will be the key to ratification particularly the Sen ate GOP leader Everett M Dirk sen who has not committed him self Said Mansfield It is my avowed hope Sen Dirksen and I will be working shouldertoshoul der to this one when the chips are down And I have every confidence In the fairness of the Republicans I am certain that with them it will not be politics but what will begood for their country Dirksen stressed the need for care Every word and every line and every phase of the treaty must be carefully examined for its present and Mure effect The committee most directly concerned Senate Foreign Rela tions is scheduled to hear testi mony Monday from Undersecre tary of State W Averell Harri man who initialed the agreement for the United States The SenateHouse Atomic Ener gy Committee and Senate Armed Services Committee also will sit in at the closed session Mansfield said he counts on Harriman to remove any doubts that US interests are safeguard ed in the treaty His experience with Ihe Soviet Union goes back two decades he said He has never yet been taken in by the Russians and is not being taken in by them now Sen John 0 Pastore DRI chairman of the Atomic Ener gy Committee said Kennedys speech was a good one which I think will draw public expect there will be a lot of letters to Senators asking them to sup port the treaty Undersecretary of State W Averell Harriman left Moscow Saturday for a direct report to President Kennedy its guests President Tito flew in for personal assessment of the de struction wrought by the quake in this glittering bustling show place of bis kind of commuaous ficials said the blaze at the Neville Chemical Co on an isle in the Ohio River about five miles from downtown Pitts burgh was no longer danger SAME DATEmiW   

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