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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 5, 1963 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 5, 1963, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper for the newspaper that makes oil North lowans neighbors CITY GLOBEGAZ Home Edition VOL 183 I Md Vaitod letanutioeal full Wlrw MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY JULY 5 JH3 Ch Sanctions on Utah defeated NEA debates teachers rift f DETROIT UPI The Na tional Education Association NEA Friday defeated a pro posal to invoke immediate sanc tions against the state of Utah after a lengthy floor fight and narrowed its docket of contro versial issues to civil rights and federal aid to education Still to be considered by dele gates before they end their six day convention were at least four Civil Rights proposals and the problem of federal aid to education Delegates approved an amend ed resolution on a Utah teach ers dispute which outlines the associations stand on collective bargaining The Resolution put the power to call sanctions which would amount to a ijational boycott in the hands of an 11member executive committee The orgi nal resolution called for the NEA to urgaaH local affiliates to urge their members not to ap ply for teaching positions in Utah until the problem is ironed out The original resolution had the unanimous backing of the Utah delegation But the one that finally passed was weakened by and amend nientwhich eliminated the call for immediate sanctions That amendment was proposed by Cecil Hannan of Washington state who said he thought the committee should have the final say The Utah dispute boils down to a fight between the Utah Ed ucation Association UEA and the state government over allo cation of funds for education Teachers contended the state legislature bad not appropriated enough money to run the school system They decided n o t to renew their contracts for the coming school year unless a special legislative session was called to allocate additional funds Gov George Clyde refused to call the session but agreed late in May to appoint a ninemem ber blueribbon citizens commit tee to work out the dispute Moroni L Jensen president of the UEA tried to get a com mitment from the NEA that its executive committee would in voke a sanction immediately if the negotating committee fails to resolve the problem But Hannan said he thought the NEA committee should be allowed to study all developments before com mi ting itself If the Utah dispute is not cleared up by fall Jensen said teachers will not return to their jobs That would mean about 250000 public school children would be kept out of their classes 70 million now hold jobs in US WASHINGTON W Employ ment in the United States climbed over 70 million for the first time in history during June the Labor Department re ported Friday At the same time the seasonal surge of teen agers looking for jobspushed unemployment up 800000 to 48 million The Bureau of Labor Statis tics reported that total employ ment during June was 703 mil lion reaching this figure 15 years to the month after total employment first hit 60 million in June We ot Two No 124 to Moscow f wd w North Iowa Weather outlook Partly clevdy with scattered end thunderstorms fhrevfh Setvrdey Fri day meht in the tfe Hifhs etwrdey 7544 Weather details an pefe 2 US warning to rails Lastditch effort to avert strike WASHINGTON UK Secre tary of Labor W WUlard Wirtz warned both sides Friday to make a lastditch effort to set tle the railroad work rules dis pute by collective bargaining He asked for an answer by Sunday If no agreement is reached to continue talks the railroads already have said they will put controversial New York rules into effect after midnight Wed nesday Union officials have warned this would bring an immediate strike Wirti in conference after a 30minute meeting with the negotiators for the rail roads and five operating unions indicated that if his proposal was rejected the administra tion would seek legislation im mediately Wirtz proposed a temporary solution for two key issues in the dispute the question of removal of some 40000 fire men from freight and yard trains and the makeup of the crews of all trains aside from those riding in the car In both issues he proposed acceptance of the recommenda tions of a presidential emer gency board in May as a basis for a twoyear trial During this two1 years a new group with equal representa tion from unions and the rail roads would study the ques tion To iron out details of the tem porary agreement Wirtz called for a 20day negotiating period beyond the Wednesday dead line with both sides agree ment that James J Reynolds assistant secretary of labor would make a binding decision on any issue not settled during the period A strike would affect virtually all US railroads and could idle up to 700000 workers The dispute centers around the announced intention of the railroads to institute new work rules dojhg away with thou sands of jobs which they say are not necessary They call such jobs featherbedding The unions involved repre senting about 200000 workers claim present work rules must be maintained for safe opera tion of the trains They had warned they would strike immediately if the rules changes were put into effect And a rail labor spokesman has reported the unions have been notified the rules changes will become effective July H the day after the bargaining dead line Kennedy has warned both Please turn to page 2 BOOS SIGNS FOR DALEY When Mayor Richard Daley tried to address a rally of the National Association for Advancement of Colored People in downtown Grant Park July 4 he was greet ed by these signs and boos from some members of the crowd Mayor Daley walked off the platform and departed without delivering his message Inside The Globe TOP U S church officials are arrested Page 2 CITY GOES Wild West July 19 Page 6r COWBOY ART in library exhibit Page 8 OBSERVE 100th year at Lutherans children home Page 20 Editorials 4 Mason City News 67 Latest markets 7 Society news 89 Clear Lake news 10 Sports news 1112 Comics Television news 1516 Classified pages 1819 North Iowa news20 Child 9 dies in grain bin WAYLAND 9yearold farm boy helping his father in a feed grinding operation suffo cated in a grain bin Thursday Dean Leichty son of Mr and Mrs Daniel Leichty who farm two miles northeast of here went inside the bin to dislodge the grain While his father delivered some grain to a feed lot the boy ap parently continued dislodging the grain When it gave way suddenly the boy was buried beneath the grain He also is survived by a young er brother and sister Boo Mayor Daley off the stage CHICAGO AP Mayor Rich ard J Daley and the Rev J H Jackson a Negro clergyman who teads the National Baptist Con vention were jeered off the speak ers platform Thursday at a rally of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peo ple More than 100 chanting sign carrying demonstrators some of hem white and some wearing beatnik beards drowned out Ma yor Daleys intended message of welcome to an estimated crowd of 15000 in Chicagos lakefront Grant Park Later the same group hooted down Dr Jackson who had sat hrough the antiDaley demonstra tion awaiting his own turn to speak Dr Jackson pastor of Oli vet Baptist Church in Chicago is president of the National Baptis1 Convention composed of five mil lion Negroes He too gave up and left the scene In betweenSen Paul Douglas DI11 was cheered enthusiast ically before and after his speech The demonstrations along with some minor heckling of Roy Wil kins executive secretary of the NAACP appeared to be expres sions of impatience over the pace of integration and reflections o some integrationist leaders that Chicago is one of the most seg regated cities in the nation Split on Common Market BONN Germany AP Presi dent Charles de Gaulle and Chancellor Konrad Adenauer ailed to agree Friday on what rind of relations the Common Market should have with Brit ain West German officials report ed The officials emerging from a hreehour conference of top West German and French leaders re ported that the meeting resulted only in a delay of the problem They added that no effective agreement could be reached ei ther on farm prices another difficulty that has been holding up progress in the Common Mar ket Adenauer was smiling as he saw De Gaulle to his car but oth er ministers looked discouraged High hopes had been set on this meeting Werner Schwarz West German agriculture minister said new studies would have to be made on measures proposed to solve farm problems Anything further has to be done in Brussels he added Foreign ministers and agricXil ture ministers of six Common Market countries are due to mee there next week De Gaulle and Adenauer me on this second day of the French presidents visit to discuss the kind of relations the West Euro pean market should have with Britain blocked by a French veto from entering the Common Market Sibley crash kills man 25 SIBLEY George Block Jr 25 Little Rock Iowa one of five persons driving from Sibley to the Lake Okoboji area was killed Thursday Sheriff Arnold Scheu said their car belonging to George Block Sr of Little Rock ran into the rear of a semitrailer truck near Harris Corners on Highway 9 about 12 miles east of Sibiey at pm Four other passengers were taken to a Sibley hospital Three of them Arnold Voss 26 of Little Rock and Linda Stevens 17 and Rose Van Sickle 31 both of Sibley were reported in critical condition Dennis Hayenga 21 Sibley was identified as the driver oi the car He was reported les seriously injured CATCH BALLOON PARAMOUNT Calif UPi 40foot redstriped expcrl mental balloon led police a merry chase across the Los An geles area Thursday before it was captured by using a hell copters wind to force it down Mark M Semich said he had just completed a flight in the balloon when it broke away DELEGATION ARRIVES IN Hsiaoping leader of the Chinese Commu nist delegation arrives at a Moscow airport The Chi nese group came to Russia for a showdown battle with Premier Khrushchev over control of world com mumsm Man at left is not identified JFK returns note on peace to Mr K By DOUGLAS B CORNELL HYANNIS PORT Mass President Kennedy in an ex change of Fourth of July mes sages witji Soviet Premier Khrush chev has voiced a hope for just and lasting world peace and a British Guiana site of growing racial murders GEORGETOWN British Gui ana UPI Two more persons were killed in racial clashes Thursday bringing the weeks otal to four and the govern ment Friday applied stiff new measures in an effort to curb he disorders The dead men both Indians were found at West Ruimveldt on the southern suburbs and at Anns Grove 20 miles east of the capital Arson looting and disorders were reported in a number of towns FOUND SAFE KIMBERLY B C UPI Raymond Swirsky 2 bad been sought by 600 volunteers since he disappeared in bushland near here late Wednesday He was found safe Thursday Ray mond screamed pulled off a shoe and threw it at his res cuer solution of those key problem which divide us Khrushchev sent Independeuc Day greetings Thursday to th President and the American peo pic offering warm congratula tions and wishing you peace and prosperity Kennedys reply was sen Thursday and released Friday The American people the President assured Khrushchev are grateful for your message o good will on the anniversary o our Independence Day The American revolution was Dascd on the desire of our peo pSe to build a free nation in world of peace Today that desire for peace is more urgent than ever The world has long passec that time when armed conflic can be the solution to internation al problems I share your desire expressed in your message of to day that we move forward will understanding toward the solution of those key problems which di vide us I am hopeful fhat world peace just and lasting can b achieved The Soviet leader had told th President that in our age th age ofharnessing nuclear energj and penetrating the depths of th universe the maintenance c peace has become a vita nee for all mankind A Busy Fourth of July for the Kennedys MRS EDWARD KENNEDY HYANNIS PORT Mass President Kennedy planned to re lax Friday along the Cape Cod shore after a frenzied Fourth of July for the Kennedy family Three generations of Kennedys were involved Thursday in such matters of urgency as a potential national railroad strike a birth an operation and the Presidents reunion with his wife and two children after a 10day trip to Eu rope Friday Kennedy wanted nothing more strenuous than routine con ferences with some of his staff and an afternoon cruise on Nantucket Sound The vacation lasts only until Monday when Kennedy fiies back to Washington But it does pro vide his longest respite in weeks from wrestling with racial and other domestic issues and from the strain of his visits to Ger many Ireland England and Italy The President hadnt seen his family since he flew to Europe June 22 And he barely made it here to greet them at the end of the holiday He conferred at the White House with Secretary of Labor W Willard Wirtz on the rail strike threatened for midnight Wednesday then boarded the presidential jet and look off for the cape About the same time Atty Gen and Mrs Robert F Kennedy were flying by helicopter from Hyannis Port to Boston where she gave birth Thursday night to a Spound 14ounce boy He is their fifth son They also have three girls The baby is the second ot the children born on July 4 Tfie other is the eldest Kathleen 12 For the patriarch of the Ken nedys former ambassador Joseph P Kennedy it was the 2lst grand child Sen Edward M Kennedys wife Joan wound up in another hospi tal Thursday A 30minute opera tion removed an abcess from the inside of her throat Sen Ken nedy DMass and his wife also were vacationing here Ambassador Kennedy was sit ting OB the porch of his home in the Kennedy compound and the first lady and two children were standing on the lawn when a heli copter brought the President from nearby Otis Air Force Base Towheaded Caroline 5 and John Jr 2 rushed to their daddy with outstretched arms They got a hug and a kiss Then it was Mrs Kennedys turn and it was a warm embrace Finally the President walked up to the porch and thrust out a hand to his father who never has recovered from a stroke suffered in Decent ber 1961 MRS ROBERT KENNEDY Bid to settle squabble Cool greeting for delegation MOSCOW and Red hinese delegates opened a lowdown meeting Friday over ontrol of the world Communist lovemcnt The Chinese flew into Moscow i midaftcrnoon and were ireeted by a facade of friendlU less But they were under in ductions to stand firm on Pe i n gs challenge to Premier Krushchevs leadership of world ommunism The two delegations began licit talks at a secret location The Russians made an effort o play down the meeting There vcrc no Soviet newsmen or pho ographcrs at the airport and no announcement that the Chi nese had arrived The outcome could determine he future of hundreds of millions of persons for years to come The Kremlin conference was the most dramatic peak in communisms quarrels far overshadowing the 1948 split between Stalin and President Tito of Yugoslavia Despite a lastminute exchange of angry charges the Kemlin sent the head of its delegation to the airport to meet the Chinese He is Mikhail Suslov 60 member of the powerful party Presidium With him was a large delegation of party officials The Chinese delegation led by the Chinese Central Commit ec g e n c r a 1 secretary Tcng Hsiaoping 60 The delegation arrived about a lalf hour late aboard a big Soviet TU104 jet airliner Also on hand were nearly 200 Chinese residents of Moscow leaded by the smiling Chinese ambassador Pan TzuIi Mounting charges and counter charges between Moscow and Peking apparently doomed chanc es of any real accord between the Communist giants At issue is Premier Khrush chevs policy of peaceful coexist ence with the West versus Mao Tsetungs insistence that war and violent revolution are neces sary to achieve Communist dom nation of the world The basic quarrel is who is to have the rigtit to interpret the rinciplos Jaid down by Lenin founder of the first Communist The Soviet Union accusedthe Chinese of slander meddling and aggravating relations on the eve of the talks A blistering statement by Soviet Communist party Central Committee denounced the ror unleashing a 30000word blast on June 14 against Premier Khrushchev then trying to spread he letters contents throughout Russia after the Soviets refused to publish it The Russians said Chinese crews of the PekingMoscow ex iress dropped off pamphlets and caflets along the line and read them over the trains loudspeaker system Viewed through Soviet eyes such actions have the flavor of a call for revolution in the Soviet Union Red China lashed back with molest to the Soviet Embassy in Peking for the expulsion of five Chinese from Moscow for distrib uting the letter The protest called the Soviet ouster unreasonable SAME DATE1H22W Jnfety Department Floret Black Means fttttft te 24   

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