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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 29, 1962 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 29, 1962, Mason City, Iowa                             t North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for the ON CITY GLOBE The newspaper that makes aii North lowans HOME EDITION VOL 102 Associated Press Valtei Press lotemttloail FuU Leasa Wirci MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY OCTOBER 29 1962 n e i g hb o r s 1 Consists of Two One No 224 Organize teams for Cuba inspection One Man Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL GlobeGazette Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KGLO 1300 pm Sun WOI Ames 640 Tuts WTAD Quincy 930 pm Thurs WSUI Iowa Cily 910 pm Sat Machines to do our thinking TLL LEVEL WITH YOU right at the start of this little visit My subject is electronic computers and their potential for doing most of our thinking for us My emotions are mixed to say the least Im not sure at all that this scientific ad vance augurs well for mankind On the basis of what I have been able to learn about these thinking machines from our editorial research bureau and other sources I am going to visit with you about their pos sible effect on our daily lives our government and business Less than 10 years old they have already made their mark on our economy Business and government officials turn to them for help in handling rou tine paper work and in making important decisions In a check er game with an electronic computer you wouldnt stand a chance Highspeed electronic com puters came along just in time to deal with what is being re ferred to as our information explosion Scientific facts are doubling in number every sev en years according to Glenn Seabqrg chairman the Atomic Energy By 2000 AD he predicts we will require 16 tinies more stor age space than now unless new concepts and techniques are developed Computers are uniquely qualified for this job Information stored in an elec tronic memory can be re trieved in a matter of seconds At the same time electronic computers are speeding the ac cumulation of knowledge There are predictions that computers will revolutionize hu man society Thats what fright ens me A Bell Telephone re searcher says the computer revolution may be compared with the Copernican or Darwin ian revolution both of which revolutionized mans idea of himself and the world about him Most scientists however insist we are headed toward a more exciting and meaningful life not a sterile robot exist ence Devising machines to tighten work physical and mental be gan with civilization itself The abacus a rudimentary counting device spawned in China or still used was a forerunner of geardriven adding machines built in 1642 by Blaise Pascal Charles Babbage mathe matics professor at Cambridge University is the father of the computer Subsidized by the British government he under took in 1823 to build an en gine to calculate and print such things as tables and loga rithms He never quite got the job done The rule that necessity is the mother of invention figured in the development of the modern computer Our great need was for a better way to handle U S census figures The 1880 count of 50 million persons took sev en years to process To remedy this situation the Census Bureau made use of an invention by one Herman Hol lerith a statistician from Buf falo His automatic datahand ling machine used perforated cards Thanks largely to this device the 1890 census was ex ecuted in a little more than two years Not until World War II how ever did the giant stride for ward take place ENIAC the first electronic computer came into being It was 26 years in the making and was unveiled at the University of Pennsylvania It solved its first Turn to 2 Please U N to check rocket bases FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES WASHINGTON President Kennedy Monday named a threeman committee to negotiate for effec tive United Nations inspection of the removal of So viet missile bases from Cuba Kennedydesignated John J McCloy whom he previously had appointed special assistant to U N Ambassador Adlai Stev enson during the period of the Cuban emergency as chairman of the group The oilier members are Undersecretary of State George Warships remaining on station TROOP CARRIER WING ACTIVATED As planes of the 512th Troop Carrier Wing stand ready on flight line at Willow Grove Pa Naval Air Station Col Allan Beaumont operations officer arrives for duty after the wing an Air Force Reserve unit was ordered to duty because of the Cuban crisis The Defense Department said the Photofax Reservists would remain on active duty for the time being despite the lessening of tension The U S reportedly was ready to invade Cuba when the Russian order came to dismantle the rocket bases there North Iowa Fair Monday night lows 30 to 35 Increasing cloudiness Tuesday highs near 60 Iowa Fair a little warmer they would be sent soon northwest Monday night lows Prune Minister Nehru asked 30 to 35 Considerable cloudiUS Ambassador John Kenneth ness Tuesday warmer south Galbraith for the weapons and an highs 60 to 65 Further outAmerican Embassy spokesman Partly cloudy Wednessaid Galbraith indicated they are coming Almost simultaneously an Indi an spokesman announced the loss of Demchok the farthest thrust i Chinese have made southward at the western end of the fighting front look day FiveDay Iowa Temperatures will average near normal in Iowa for the fiveday period Monday night through Satur day Normal low tempera tures range from 29 in north west Iowa to 37 in the south east Normal highs vary from the lower 50s in northern Iowa to the upper 50s in the south A warming trend will be noted at the beginning of the pe riod but it will turn cooler toward the end of the week Little or no precipitation forecast is Minnesota Mostly fair a little warmer Highs Tuesday near 60 GlobeGazette weather up to 8 am Monday Maximum Minimum Sunrise Sunset data 56 27 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Sunday Maximum Minimum 75 31 French back ballot plan PARIS UPI President Charles de Gaulle won the back ing of French voters in a na tional referendum approving his plans for the popular election of future presidents But the nar rowness of his majority signaled trouble ahead for Frances Fifth Republic Premier Georges Pompidou said the results gave de Gaulle no cause to resign The 72year old president had threatened to quit unless he received a heavy majority De Gaulles proposal for pop ular election of presidents re ceived 6176 per cent of the bal lots cast but this represented only 4644 per cent of the total electorate this case The vote election of presidents and 7932ness 399 against This represented Rqd Chinese troops continue advance India turns to US for arms FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES WASHINGTON American warships blockading Cuba will remain on station pending United Nations all and Deputy Secretary of defense Rosweli Gilpatric White House press secretary Pi rre Salinger described the group a coordinating committee to ive full time andattention to the matters involved in the ion of the Cuban crisis He said the group wouldreport irectly to the President but act nder the supervision of the three fficials concerned These are ecretary of State Dean Rusk ecretary of Defense Robert S IcNamara and Stevenson Ball and Gilpatric leftfor New NEW DELHI India turned to the United States7Mon day for weapons to fight the Com munist Chinese and was assured The spokesman estimated be tween 2000 antL2500 Indian sol diers are dead the Chinese launched their offen sive 20 and added the Chinese are believed to have suffered much heavier casualties Reinforcements were being rushed to Se Pass to try to head off at least one 10000man Chinese division moving from the key northeast border town of Towang lost last week Despite setbacks such as the loss of Demchok India refused offers of mediation of the undeclared war with China A Foreign Ministry spokesman selfrespecting country and certainly not India with her love of freedom can submit to Chinese aggression whatever may be the consequences nor can In dia allow Chinas occupation of Indian territory to be used as a bargaining counter for dictating i a vcajjuiia naa euiCfiuy arnveu to India a settlement of different France and Canada have also es regarding the boundary on Chi nas terms American infantry weapons for the Indian defenders in the Him alayas may begin arriving by air by the end of this week it was understood N ews in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES Commies sentence Yank East Berlin court sentenced Jean P Loba 37 Altadena Calif to years in prison on charges of plotting to smuggle refugees to West Berlin Eleanor holding her own NEW YORK Eleanor Roosevelts condition was reported to be unchanged a spokesman for the seriously aiHng 78yearold former first lady said The spokesman reported that Mrs Roosevelts ane mia and lung infection had not been responding to treatment as wellas expected but later the spokes man said she is holding her own l Financier returns for trial NEW Fugitive financier Edward M Gilbert who fled the countryafter telling his board of directors he had withdrawn nearly million from his firm without authorization returned voluntarily from his Brazilian sanctuary to face charges Will keep Norstad on job WASHINGTON President Kennedy has or dered retiring Gen Lauris Norstad to stay on the job as supreme allied commander in Europe for another 90 days because of the world crisis Stunning US LONDON Western Europe hailed the Soviet Unions retreat in the Cuban crisis as a stunning vic tory for the United States and greeted it universally with profound relief Sabotage by Castroites CARACAS Venezuela AP US diplomats are alerting Latin American governments against an expected continentwide Castro sabotage campaign believed launched Sunday with bombings that knocked out onesixth of Ven ezuelas oil production Authoritative sources in Wash ington said Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro gave the signal for general terrorist action in Latin America with the Americanoper ated oil fields in Venezuela a prime target Saboteurs dynamit ed four power stations of the Cre ole Petroleum Corp at Lake Mar acaibo which holds beneath its waters one of the worlds richest oil stores The Jakeroughly 75 miles wide and 130 miles long lies about 300 miles west of Car acas The bombers struck shortly aft er midnight Saturday a few hours after President Romulo Betan court ordered mobilisation of the armed forces to counter what he called the threat to Venezuela of the reservoir of Soviet nuclear rockets in Cuba Venezuela blamed the oil field bombing on Communists Two suspects were hauled out of the debrisstrewn waters of Lake Maracaibo after the blasts de stroyed transformer stations of Creole Petroleum a subsidiary of Standard Oil of New Jersey aeen asked to supply arms The feeling here is that only the Unit ed States can provide the amount of weapons needed Galbraith delivered to Nehru a letter from President Kennedy ex pressing sympathy lor India in its present emergency and some hing more tangible the spokes man said In response Nehru made the first direct request for American arms If the line at Se Pass does not iold the next stand for the be eaguercd Indians probably would be at Bomdila last important pass on the way to the Assam Plains A fair road connects Bomdila with the plains enabling the In dian army to bring up light tanks and overcome a supply weakness iartly responsible for some of the teady reverses old border war Russia tries to paint Nikita as hero MOSCOW AP Soviet The president took the stand press and radio did its best Mon tnat the majority m his favor day to depict Premier Khrushchev must not be either mediocre or as the man who averted a pos indecisive he said I do not sibJe thermonuclear war over think these adjectives apply in Cuba This was coupled with warning showed 12that the West should hot interpret 808848 in favor of the popular Soviet peacefulness as a weak Both points were made on the T 4tUVtl pUlllVO C UlClUC UJI IIIC votes of 7725 per cent of the front page of Pravda the official electorate Communist party newspaper which said Khrushchevs decision to remove rockets from Cuba had the unanimous support of the So viet people Both Pravda and the Moscow radio also gave much space to statements from abroad hailing Khrushchev as the savior of peace The United States was being deHome LeRoy Minn three days agojhe papers were saying there were no such rockets and that American photo graphs of their bases were faked scribed as one big area of hyster ia The terms on which the weap ons will be supplied were lef open a US Embassy sppkesmai said In the past India has insisted on paying for weapons but now there is no cash and a desperate need for arms A small shipment of British weapons has already arrived Russian missile sites the De fense Department said Monday The announcement was made by assistant defense secretary Arthur Sylvester at a briefing of newsmen However Sylvester refused to be drawn into any discussion of whether the US fleet would continue to stop ships suspectec of carrying military cargoes to Communist Cuba Sylvester also was asked US aerial reconnaissance pho tos of Cuban missile site showed that Soviet Premie Khrushchevs order to dismantl them actually were beingrcar ried out He also sidesteppe this question saying can be any help to you pji that Asked if US military air sur veillance was continuing Syl vester said I presume it is But other sources indicatec hat aerial checking of the Communist military buildup has been at a standstill since Sun day There was an almost tangible easing of the tension that grip ped the nation during the past week of crisis There was no accompanying of the military prepara ions which had been mounting oward an expected bombing of the nineday Hard fighting also was indicated on the Ladakh front some 850 miles westward along the jagged Himalayan frontier The Indians said one post was lost there when the Chinese opened an attack around Demchok in overwhelming numbers with rapjdfiring weap ons The battleground there is nearly three miles high Demchok is close to the undefined border of Kashmir and the attack consti tutes the farthest southward Chi nese thrust in the western sector Killed under his tractor Wherry 53 was killed Sunday noon when his farm tractor overturned in a ditch on a county road three miles northeast of here Wherry was pulling a bean combine His wife was following him in a pickup truck Mitchell County Sheriff Mervel Angell said Wherrys head was crushed when the tractor landed on him Funeral arrangements are in complete at the Martz Funeral Surviving are his wife the former Betty Lucas two sons iwu auua i vaSSlly Some Soviet citizens appeared Everett LeRoy Teddy US Air A Kuznetsov Soviet first to have only a vagueidea of what Force England two grandohil deputy foreign minister who is had been going on during the past dren three brothers Lbran week Very little of the American side of the Cuban case has been printed here Nevertheless most Russians ap peared relieved at the peaceful turn of events lerloo Ralph Osage and Har ley LeRoy three sisters Mrs Harry Mulcahy Melbourne Iowa Mrs Harvey Erbe Or chardv and Mrs John Erbe Cabool Mo strike or invasion of Cuba Informed officials said they dont expect to see any substan tial reduction in those land sea and air preparations at least un til this country is convinced the missile threat from Cuba is re moved Even after that it is almost certain that aerial surveillance will be continued over Cuba to make sure there is no new sneak try at setting up ballistic mis siles pointed toward the United States On the inside Editorials Page 4 Society News 89 North Iowa News 12 Sports i 1314 Latest Markets 16 Mason City News U17 Comics la AP Photofax EMISSARY ON Premier Khrushchevs emissary on the Cuban situation talks to newsmen on arriving at New Yorks Idlewild Airport He ar rived less than 12 hours after Khrushchevs offer W withdraw missiles from Cuba ofthe National Security Coun U Monday morning McCloy al eady was in New York Salinger said the coordinating ommittee would function in New ork The press secretary said it vould be concerned with imple menting the letters of President Kennedy and Premier Khrush hev In these letters exchanged over he weekend Soviet Khrushchev pledged dismantling of Soviet bases in Cuba and a halt to th delivery of offensive weap ons to the Castro regime in re turn for ah end to the US block ade and a pledge Khrushchev has dispatched Deputy Foreign Minister Vassily Kuznetsov to the United Nations work withActing Secretary eneral U Thant in dealing with he many details involved in a settlement Salinger said he had nation as to whether McCloy Ball and Gilpatric would aceom iany U Thant to Havana Tuesday o meet with Cuban Prime Minis er Fidel Castro and devise meth ds of confirming that the Sovieta ffensive weapons are removed Washington policymakers held with liberal doses of a breakthrough has seen scored in the USSoviet con rohtation that bordered on poten ial nuclear conflict Informed sources said there vere no deals or secret under tandings involved with the Soviet eaders offer to dismantle the lubair bases and return their ockets to the Soviet mly price he asked was a guar antee which Kennedy gave that he United States would not invade Cuba Khrushchev agreed to defusa he missile bases in a letter to Kennedy made public Sunday morning in Moscow The Soviet eader said the interests of peace guided his decision Obviously eager to match his adversarys conciliatory tone Kennedy issued a public state ment praising Khrushchevsdeci sion as statesmanlike arid as an mportant and constructive con ribution to peace In a quick reply to the premier Kennedy said Khrushchev had made pos sible a step back from danger The White House studiously ig nored Castros renewed demand that the United States get out of its Guantanamo Bay naval State Department ap peared to brush Castroright out of the picture as far as tha dismantling of missile bases was concerned 2 SOVIET ATESTS WASHINGTON UPI Rus sia conducted two nuclear tests Sunday exploding an intermedi ate yield device at a highalti ude and a lower yield weapon n the atmosphere SAME DATEW1534   

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