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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, October 25, 1962 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 25, 1962, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper for Homt c The VOL 102 Associated Prest and United International Full Ltuu newspaper rthat makes all North I o wans MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER 25 1942 HOME EDITION neighbors Paper of Two No 221 Blockade guns swivel to greet strangers in waters oft Cuba By CHARLES ETAYLOR MIAMI UPI The Navy has drawn its toeline in the ocean on the 24th parallel north ofCuba and along it Americas blockade guns swivel challengingly to greet a stranger Flying this line fiveinch turret guns abroad US de stroyers lock you squarely in their sights You are trapped on radar screens below decks and in dark rooms ashore Interceptor jets wait above the clouds to drop to your wingtips if you make a wrong move The parallel marking 24 degrees north latitude runs eastwest around the globe about 30 miles south of Key West at the tip of the Florida keys Havana is 60 miles be yond the line going south But ships and planes go south of the line only with permission of the Navy after a check of cargo and destina tion The line is the north ern boundary of the blockade ordered by President Ken nedy to halt military ship ments to Cuba Flying south from Miami in a twoengine Grumman Widg e o n amphibian observers could see fishing boats dotting the Atlautic waters off the chain ofkeys and freighters steaming along the channel of the gulf stream with no hint of crisis at sea One was the 4915ton Kordun of Yugoslavian reg istry But she was bound around the tip of the Keys for New Orleans not for Cuba She would stay above the parallel As the plane approached the civilian airport giv ing a wide berth to the big Boca Chica Naval Air Station two silver Navy jets returning from patrol dropped suddenly out of the clouds to land their flaps and wheels down and trailing exhaust smoke A Globemaster transport landed behind them at the air base where other jets were clustered along runways It took 30 minutes and six calls between the Federal Aviation Agency and the Navy at Key West to get clearance to fly along the 24th parallel Heading south from the southernmost U S city to in An act of force but not war Quarantine or 1 a blockade By JACK VANDENBERG WASHINGTON UPI State Department lawyers say there is about as much difference be tween the words blockade and quarantine as there is between guts and intestinal fortitude The practical meaning of both is the same but one sounds nicer President Kennedy avoided the use of blockade in his announce ment of the US action against Cuba He consistently referred to it as a quarantine Other administration officials said a quarantine is an act of force but not an act of war In international law books blockade usually is associated with war and unless justified by such circumstances as self defense is considered an act of war I In either case diplomatic lawyers said there is nodiffer ence in the authority of US shipsto use force to halt and search ships bound forCuba The meanings are so close that even the international legal experts frequently slip and refer to the current US action as a blockade However they never fail to note that it is a selective blockade aimed only at halting shipmentsof offensive weapons At first glance the USaction would appear to contradict the historic American contention that any belligerent blockade is an act of war But the con tention of the state department lawyers is that authorizations in the UN charter and Rio treaty remove this action from that category In the law books a belligerent blockade means one which uses force to prevent the entry of ships into the harbors of the target nation A Pacific blockade differs in that shipping nations merely are asked to halt traffic with the target nation The most recent US use of a blockade occurred in 1954 when this country acted swiftly to cut off arms shipments to the pro Communist regime then in sway in Guatemala Although no formal blockade was declared the US govern ment said it would consider weapons shipments to the country as a threat to hemis pheric security Later US authorities removed arms from a French freighter searched a Dutch freighter and stopped a shipment of ammunition in a West German port A blockade of Cuba in 1878 led to the Spanish American war The war broke out only two days after President William McKinley ordered the blockade on April 22 1898 His action against the thenSpanishheld island was prompted by the sinking o the battleship Maine in Havana harbor almost two months earlier A blockade normally is en forced by a visit and search procedure that works this way The blockader orders a vessel to stop and lie to An officer and two unarmed men usually make up a party which courteously ex amines the ships papers and cargo i If there is anything suspicious they may seize the ship for further investigation If a ship does not stop when ordered the blockader may use force US warships have orders to let ships bearing arms to proceed to other ports but to sink them if they try to continue to Cuba tersect the parallel it ap peared the ocean was empty except for a few small boats close to shore A destroyer appeared below through the clouds and haze and hove to with its bow to ward Cuba It was the first of the line of Navy picket ships A radar screen spun atop the destroyers mast and binoculars showed its forward turret gun gray with a white tip swing up to the little plane approaching on a line across the ships stern When the plane was astern of the ship the muzzle of the aft fiveincher took up the tracking About 35 miles beyond the first destroyer another one lay in the water a few miles inside the blockade zone With their radar sweeps in terlocking the two vessels could spot any ships heading across the line in the deep water channel along the Keys Beyond the second destroyer the channel is bordered by the Cay Sal Shallows But other ships were strung out in the deep water passages to the east The Navys orders were to stop ships heading across the 24th parallel to check their cargo and to turn them away from Cuba if they carried military supplies for the is land If any ships balked there were planes waiting above and submarines be neath the ocean Turning northward toward Miami the plane flew over more freighters apparently bound southward toward the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana and Texas ports or northward to the Atlantic There was no sign of the Navy here EMERGENCY RATIONS Frances Photofax gency School children were asked to Eileen Grecos first graders at Miles and canned foodaspart of Elementary School in Tampa Fla VCivil Defense snow off the jugs of water they rent crisis that has im brought to school for use in an emerpact in the Florida area Cuba tightens its hold after big rush on consumer goods FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES HAVANA Premier Fidel Castros revolutionary regime tightened controls on consumer to halt a wave of panic buying apparently in spired by the US arms block ade Storekeepers were instructed to limit sales of emergency lighting supplies to one quart of lamp alcohol and three candles per family with infant children Even in these limited quanti ties storekeepers were allowed to sell only to thenregular cus tomers Neighborhood comm it tees were alertedto help enforce the order The new restriction extended a ration list which already in cluded milk many foods soap and other staple household goods in shortageridden Cuba Housewives flocked to super markets and neighborhood gro ceries yesterday to stock up on lighting supplies despite Presi N ews in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES Steel executives fined NEW YORK Five steel corporation executives were fined a total of on their pleas of no con test to charges of conspiracy to fix prices and rig bids in steel sales Federal Judge Sylvester J Ryan refused simultaneously to accept like pleas from four steel companies and a trade association named de fendants in the same indictment Immunization campaign OKd WASHINGTON President Kennedy has flashed the green light for the start of a threeyear campaignof mass immunization against polio diph theria whooping cough and tetanus The program backed by million in federal funds will start next July and although the emphasis will be on vaccinat ing children under 5 persons of all ages will be eligible reaction in Iowa DBS Efforts in Iowa to effect a state of readiness to meet any emergency arising from the Cuban situation are meeting a mixed reaction Al though there was no panic Civil Defense agencies and many city officials in Iowa sprang into action to review procedures already set out and take additional measures But in some Iowa towns no immediate steps apparently were forthcoming Fears ease in Europe Soviet Premier Khrushchevs sum mit feeler eased European fears that the Soviet Un ion arid the United States might go to war over Cuba A Soviet Embassy official in London asserted arms supplied to Cuba by Moscow are not fitted with nu clear warheads dent Kennedys statement that he blockade would not affecl the necessities of lifeand Cas ros statement that his regime ould furnish thepeoples needs The buyers apparently fearec that the blockade might soon be extended to cut the oil im ports needed to run the power plants which supply electricity o Havanas homes Grocery shelves also were swept clear of unrationed food tuffs despite g o v e r n m e ri aroadcasts warning a g a i n s hoarding Even coffee was unavailable in this coffeegrowing country The general pace of military preparations in Havana acceler ated with the emplacement o machine guns and other antiair craft weapons on rooftops in many parts of the city A a n k which hadbeen stationed outsid armed forces headquarters wa moved elsewhere and the patro boats which had been operating about a mile off the waterfron disappeared The official radio exhorte government informers belong ingto the neighborhood commit tees to smash the enemies o the revolution government wherever they dare raise their heads On the inside Editorials Page 4 Society News Sports 1314 Latest Markets U Mason City News 1617 Comicsti ig Clear Lake News T North Iowa News 20 SAME 527 Department Doth Fait 21 Hoars But the Miami airport EAA radio kept a close watch on the plane and called for fre quent identification and radio checks when pilot Joe Mau geri made a slight change in the flight plan he carefully filed with federal authorities Man theres never been surveillance like this he said The FA A a few hours later ordered civilian aircraft to stay clear of south Florida unless their flight plans have military approval and they carry twoway radios ss ship to proceed Nikita accepts freeze OUR WIRE SERVICES MOSCOW Soviet Premier Khrushchev agreed Thursday to nalt all shipments to Cuba for two to three weeks if the United States lifts its Cuban blockade for the same length of time The official Soviet Tass new agency said Khrushchev madi his offer in response to an ap peal IJnited Nations Actin f0 States to agree to a twotothree week suspension of their ac tions on Cuba In Washington Kennedy was reported ready to tell Thant that ic could accept the plea only under certain conditions The J S view was that it would be oolhardy to call off its blockade without ironclad guarantees against a further Soviet arms juildup in Cuba Authoritative sources said Ken nedys reply could be termed a conditional acceptance or at leasl not a complete turndown sources said Kennedys reply was in the hands of UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Informants said Kennedy wel comes U Thant s motives in ask ing Russia to stop sending war material to Cuba and asking this country to suspend its quarantine of Cuba for two weeks State Department officials de clined to spell out the conditions Kennedy made in his proposec message to U Thant but they confirmed that the President stressed the necessity of getting certain guarantees before even considering the secretary gener als suggestion Kennedy is also reported to restating in the message the whole problem of Soviet missile already in Cuba The UThant sug gestion is understood to hav avoided this question dealing onlj with further Soviet bloc deliverie to Cuba The U Thant request US of ficials stressed is not bein turned down They conceded however that the condition Kennedy will make in his reply are stringent The Weathet Iowa Fair extreme west part ly cloudy central and eas through Friday with a few snow flurries near the Missis sippi River Thursday night Continued cold Thursday night lows 2532 Warmer northwest and extreme wes Friday highs in the 50s Fur ther Generally fai and warmer Saturday Minnesota Partly cloudy some what warmer Highs Fridaj around 50 GlobeGazette weather dat up to 8 a m Thursday Maximum 52 Minimum 24 At 8 a m 25 Precipitation trace Sunrise Sunset Cuban crisis Highlights ROM OUR WIRE SERVICES KEY WEST FlaA large troop train carrying foot sol diers unloaded at the northern end of the Florida Keys add ing more muscle to Americas front line of land defense in the Cuban crisis The train the third to arrive in 24 hours and it included a string ofPullman cars loaded with troops apparently infantry men WASHINGTON Civil de fense Agencies national up Thursday to rneetanyeveritu aljties posed by the Cuban crisis The capitals emergen cy relocation center at nearby Lorton VaJ on a basis 4 VIENNA More than 1000 Czechoslovaks marched on the US Embassy in Prague and some demonstrators tore down the American flag dur ing a noisyprotest rally against the US blockade WASH I NGTONHomefroht mobilization plans have been dusted off and brought up to date for use in event of a Soviet nuclear assault or a shooting war Office of Emer gency Planning Director Ed ward A McDermott has been checking the readiness of all agencies with emergency re sponsibilities including their preparednessto move into se cret relocation centers in non target areas a spokesman said MOSCOW Demonstrators protesting President Kenne dys Cuban blockade gathered outside the US Embassy for the second straight day chanting hands off Cuba and picketing the building with placards P A R 1 S France put its armed forces on alert to be ready for action should the Cuban crisis spread to Europe RIO PE JANEIRO About 200 women marched on the foreign office and demanded Brazil take stronger action university sfudenis support for Kennedy marched past the US consulate WASHINGTON The Post Office department said US mail still was going to Cuba aboard foreign flag ships but airmail has been stopped temporarily Farm boy dies under trtictor near Chapin Peterson 16 of near Chapin was killed Thurs day when the tractor he was driv ing alonga rural road about half a mile west of here turned over and pinned him beneath it The youth son of Mr and Mrs Richard Peterson had been work ing for Jake Allen also a farmer in the Chapin community The boy died on the way to the utheran Hospital at Hampton Funeral arrangements are pend ng at the Vogel Funeral Home rlampton JEERS DEMONSTRATORS Janet Hose she is a college student holds a sign reading Better Dead Than Red as she and other students jeer dem onstrators on the other side of the street who pro tested U S policy on Cuba The demonstrations took place in downtown Atlanta Ga Others cou rses block ading US Navy ship Thursday in ercepted a Soviet tanker but al LJWd it to continue toward Cuba The Pentagon said adozen other Soviet ships apparently turned back for fear of running into the US ban on Cuban arms ship ments Thus therestill was no direct USSoviet showdown or war incident in Cuban he island went into its secorfd day Apparently the tanker was not boarded by the Navy The Penta on said only that it was ascer ained not to oe carrying contra band weapons Washington informants said anker was hailed by the Navy hip and questioned cargo The tanker captain said he carried only petroleum Since the tanker had left its Communist port long before the blockade was announced Monday and there was no known evidence hat tankers had been used to carry weapons these sources said he ship was allowed to proceed The Navys forebearance in not boarding the tanker the inform ants said was aimed at getting across to Soviet Premier Khrush chev that the United States was not in Cuban waters with a chip on its shoulder looking for a Fight Viewed in this light the inci dent appeared to be a significant aart of the current diplomatic in terchange comparable in some respects to Khrushchevs decision not to force the issue by sending hrough the blockade vessels cer tain to be stopped turned back or sunk The Washington view was that both the turnabout of some So viet ships and the free passage of the tanker would have a pro Found bearing on intense efforts at theUnited Nations and else where to develop some kind of formula to pull the USSoviet confrontation over Cuba back from the edge of nuclear war ArthurSylvester assistant sec retary of defense read this an nouncement It now appears that at least a dozen Soviet vessels have turned back presumably because ac cording to the best of our infor mation they might have been carrying offensive materials However the first Russian ship that proceeded through the area patrolled by our naval forces was a Soviet tanker It was ascertained by the US naval vessel which intercepted her hat the tanker had only petrole um aboard Since petroleum js not present ly included as prohibited ma terial under President Kennedys proclamation setting up the quar antine the tanker was allowed to proceed The Navy satisfied itself that no prohibited m a te rial was aboard this particular ship The encounter took place short ly before 8 oclock day light time Sylvester said he cpuld not pro I   

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