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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 9, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 9, 1962, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas pa per Edited for the CITY GLOBEGAZETTE HOME EDITION VOL in The newspaper that makes all North I 6 w a n s n e i g h b o r s MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY OCTOBER 9 1762 aoc eopyTtU Pper Two secUoMBertten Oa No 207 Soviets reject protest PARTLY CLOUDY BERLIN AP The Western Allies apparently have decided to do nothing except protest the re fusal of East German guards to let a British army ambulance go to the aid of a man shot just over the Berlin wall The Soviets re Taking a new look at skills Expansion of Peace Corps By RICHARD SPONG GlobeGazette Editorial Research Bureau WASHINGTON More than 40 nations have been invited to send representatives to a three day conference on skilled man power opening used to accept the protest Mon ay The East German action was Nearly a blow to Western pres ige in Berlin Just one more slice off the Jerlin salami said one West Berliner Western officials were reluctant o predict what further action might be taken From their re marks it seemed unlikely that anything would be done Some acknowledged that the East Germans could cite their successful blocking of the ambu lance Saturday as a precedent for topping other Western military traffic in East Berlin But they pointed out that this had not hap pened yet They also pointed out that the East Germans could halt all West ern traffic unless the Allies gave it armed escort The Allies did that with some military vehicles last October when the East Ger mans beganstopping Allied cars The East Germans backed down after the Russians and the Amer icans each rushed tanks up to the wall Mayor Willy Brandts Socialist party said Soviet vehicles should San banned from West Berlin in Puerto Rico on Wednesday j retaliation for the East German in North Iowa Generally fair through Wednesday Cooler Tuesday night lows in 40s Highs Wednesday 64 to 72 Iowa Generally fair through Wed nesday Cooler Tuesday night lows lower 40s north to lower 50s south Highs Wednesday up per 60s northeast to upper 70s south Further outlook Partly cloudy mild Thursday Minnesota Mostly fair pleasant Highs Wednesday in 60s Weather Data up to 8 am Tuesday Maximum 66 Minimum 48 Sunrise Sunset YEAR AGO Maximum 77 Minimum 50 Crash near Iowa Falls proves fatal Free hand to on telegraphers issue The San Juan Conference has teen underpublicized It could have quite historic significance Collaterally it could lead to an expansion of the Peace Corps and to some extent a redefini tion of the Peace Corps mission This will be the first world wide meeting to skilled manpower deal with needs in economic development It will be the first at whichboth have and havenot nations are repre sented in large numbers For that matter it will be the larg est conference on any phase of economic development since World War II The United States is sending j powerhouse by Vice President Johnson The names of some of those sched uled to accompany him give an idea of the importance of the conference in administration eyes J Celebrezze Secretary of Health Education and Welfare W Willard Wirtz Secretary of Labor Sargent Shriver Jr Peace Corps direc tor Walter Heller chairman of the Presidents Council of Economic advisers Walt W Rostow chairman US Policy Planning Council and Frank Deputy director Agency for International Development The conference is being sored by the Peace Corps with the cooperation of the Depart ments of State and Labor The administration hopes that itwill lead to the establishment of peace corps equivalents in other nations under either govern mental or private supervision The possibility of creating domestic corps groups with US aid under the Alliance for Pro gress has been greeted with particular enthusiasm by Latin American nations And the Republic of the Philippines is starting an Operation Brother hood which is much the same thing Vice President Johnson this summer discussed with the Shah of Iran establfshing a local peace corps operation The United States as the plan now stands would send abroad technicians who would teach local technicians Aow to estab lish and administer training programs The aim would be at training what has come to be called middlelevel lathe operators construction foremen medical technologists and the like Economists now hold that less than half the average indus trialized nations development can be attributed to capital in vestment and that more than half must be attributed to man power skills Even in this country at least 60 per cent of all specialized workers have ac quired their skills through on thejob training and through working up step by step to jobs requiring higher skills However many larger com panies such as General Motors maintain institutes at which training may be acquired either on a fulltime or parttime basis These institutes could provide useful laboratories for studying the teaching of skills Econ omists now estimate that a na tion wanting to maintain an economic growth rate of 5 per cent a year must its trained mechanics and other workers by 15 to 30 per cent action There was no indication how ever of any such Allied plans One reason apparently was reluc tance to rock the boat while talks on Berlin were still in progress in New York The Allies in their protest charged that interference with the ambulance was a violation of their warworn occupation rights in all of Berlin The Russians refusing to accept the protest gave their usual comment that the matter was one for East Germanys Com munist regime The Allies refuse to deal with the satellite govern ment which they do not rec ognize East German guards apparently killed two East Germans trying to swim the Spree River to the West Monday night The mother of one of the men trying to escape saw the shooting from the western bank and collapsed Independent status for British Uganda KAMPALA Uganda red yellow and black flag of in dependent Uganda was raised Before dawn Tuesday as torn IOWA Fur man 79 Albert Lea Minn died Monday of injuries suffered in a twocar accident north of here toms beat a steady rhythm and bonfires glowed in the hills More than 40000 watched the new flag replace the Union Jack in a ceremony ending more than 60 years of British colonial rule of the East Afri can territory The Duke and Duchess of Kent represented Queen Elizabeth II Funeral services for Mrs Furman will be held Wednesday at 2 pm at the Albert Lea Methodist Church Burial will be at Albert Lea The Linn Funeral Home Iowa Falls is in charge of arrangements Mrs Furman was injured when the car in which she was riding with her daughter Mrs Robert Greene also of Albert Lea her soninlaw and two grandchildren was struck by a car driven by Thomas Van Beek Hollandale Minn Also surviving are three other daughters Mrs Marshall Jo sephine Bruce San Francisco Calif1 Mrs Ray Mildred Rei chert Blooming Prairie Minn and Mrs Kenneth Margie Frantum Albert Lea Mr and Mrs Greene and their two children Jonathan 17 and Georgia 11 are in good condition at an Iowa Falls hos pital Van Beek was treated and released He has been charged with failure to yield half the traveled portion of the highway MISSILE DAMAGED EAGLE Neb UPI The Strategic Air Command SAC Tuesday investigated an appar Union in vote of dissent But decision is binding BOYER LOOKS AT THE in fielder Clete Boyer looks up as he stands outside the canvascovered infield in New York It rained most the Yankees Francisco WASHINGTON arbi tration board Tuesday granted the Chicago and North Western Rail way a free hand subject to layoff benefits in discharging telegra phers whose jobs it finds have be come obsolete or unnecessary The decision is final and binding on both parties It was made by arbitrator Syl vester Garrett with the union dissenting and the railroad con curring George E Leighty president of the AFLCEO Order of Railroad Telegraphers represented his un ion on the threeman board and the railroads chairman Ben W Heineman represented the car of the morning forcing postponement until Wedneslrier day of the fifth game of the World Series between1 The arbitration winds up a dis Photofax ent accident which damaged an Atlas missile in an underground silo launching site near here The missile sprang a leak in its fuel tank area but no one was I injured N ews in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES Negro sprinkled with glass OXFORD flying rock and a crowd of jeering students renewed tensions on the Univer sity of Mississippi campus after James H Merediths second week as a student had begun in comparative calm The incidentoccurred at the university cafe teria No one was hurt but some broken glass sprink led on the 29yearold Negros table No assistance to Scotland Yard detective said Rob ert A Soblen apparently knocked himself into a fatal coma Sept 6 with a drug hidden in a secret pocket in his trousers I have found no evidence that he was assisted by any person Superintendent James McKay told an inquest into the fugitive spys death Congress bogged down snailpace drive for adjournment slowed down to almost a complete halt There wasno business at all on the House docket because of the death of one of its members Rep Clem Miller California Democrat killed in an air plane mishap Neither was there anything of con sequence on the calendar of the Senate Army purchasing WASHINGTON The General Accounting Of fice has accused the Army of buying worth of Nike Hercules missile parts it didnt need then ordering another S19 million worth The watchdog agency told Congress the excesses could be blamed on what it called the Armys lack of effective supply controls Castro supporters attacked NEW Cubans attacked Cas tro supporters across the street f com the United Na tions building with rocks and fists then mounted a On the inside Editorials Page 4 Society News 1011 North Iowa News 14 Sports 1516 Latest Markets 18 Mason City News 1819 20 Farm Features 21 Clear Lake News 24 3 oil firms targets of trust suits WASHINGTON Jus tice Department filed a civil anti trust suit Tuesday against three of the nations largest oil com Service Sinclair and Richfield A department spokesman said the suit filed in US District Court in Los Angeles asked the court to order the three firms to stop allocation of markets It also asked that Cities Serv ice and Sinclair be ordered to sell their stock holdings in Richfield the spokesman said and that Cit ies Service and Sinclair directors be required to resign from indicated Tuesday it may i i ii t i THmYv 1liP Air loarl in ro Fashion Farm plant leased to investor By CHARLES W WALK GlobeGazette Farm Editor MESERVEY The Mc servey Livestock Corp has purchased two farms and leased the physical plant of a third from Fashion Farm Inc ormer livestock management and leasing company Principal stockholder of the new corporation is Nathan Sheinman president of a New York dress manufacturing firm The corporation plans to enter into an extensive cattle feeding operation on the farms Navy may join in ban on cigarette gifts to hospitals oca ted just north of here ac ording to Edward Boyle Clear akc attorney who represents new corporation The new firm has purchased wo farms totaling 320 acres nd has leased a third of 15 crcs which housed the phys cal plant of Fashion Farm Buildings on the 15 acres in lude an 850foot pole feeding hed surrounded by feed lots large veterinarians barn wo horse barns a barn for ceding show cattle a feeder ig barn and a large layer 10USC Announcement of a manager and other personnel of the new orporatton will be made by heinman in the near future Boyle explained Fashion Farm Inc was WASHINGTON AP The Richfield board of directors The Justice Department said Cities Service and Sinclair were accused of agreeing not to com pete with Richfield or with each other in six Western ifornia Oregon Washington Ida ho Nevada and Arizona barrage of rotten eggs Police arrested 33 persons County Court Richfield agreed in return not to compete with the other two companies in the rest of the na tion it was charged High court may be asked to spare dogs life RICHMOND Va na tions highest court may be asked to spare the life of Ricky a 6 yearold German shepherd dog condemned to die for killing sheep An appeal to the US Supreme Court appeared Tuesday about the only course left for Rickys de fenders in the legal battle that be gan more than two years ago I certainly plan on pursuing the matter further said Atty Harvey S Lutins of Va The states high court lasl month had upheld a lower courl order that the dog be destroyed The dog vas shot and woundec in February i960 while standing near the body of a sheep in Giles County A veterinarians examina lion showed no wool yi Rickys mouth Subsequently however Ricky was sentenced to death in Giles ollow the Air Forces lead in re using to allow cigarette manu Facturers to present gift cigarettes to men in its hospitals The Air Force said last Satur day that its surgeon general has declined offers for free dislribu tion of cigarettes in Air Force hospitals because of the recen evidence which suggests furthe relation between cigarette smok ing and lung cancer other pul monary diseases and with certain ardiovascular diseases The Army said it has not taken action like that of the Air Force nor is any such action contem plated ounded four years ago by Car roll Morris Meservey It start ed out as a cow poo but grew nto the largest livestock man agement and leasing company n the United States It encountered difficulty sev eral months ago when the1 own rs of the cows and pigs the irm was managing took them jack and formed two new cor porations to disperse their loldings The two Owners Corp and Swine Own ers Corp haver offices in Belmond Through more than a dozen fieldmen operating in eight Midwest states they are attempting to locate the Hve tock owned by the investors and managed by Fashion Farm and its sister corporation Swine Improvement Assn Don Jones manager of the wo corporations says the total dispersion of the livestock will take at least two years One rea son for this is that the cor porations must wait until Fash ion Farms and SIAV leasing contracts with the farmers are ended SAME Winnie Ruth is on the loose for seventh time PHOENIX Ariz murderess Winnie Ruth Judd once dubbed the Tiger Woman escaped Monday night from Arizona State Hospital her 1931 conviction for murder hospital superin tendent Samuel Wick said he did not consider Mrs Judd dan gerous She is now 57 The escape is Her first since 1953 but a decade ago she slipped out of the hospital with embarrassing fre times in all Mrs Judd was accused of slaying two women then shipping their dismembered bodies in two trunks and a suitcase to Los Angeles The once beautiful blonde Winnie was sentenced to be hanged but 72 hours be fore her scheduled execution she was ruled insane and committed to tne hospital Dr Wick said a door to hospital grounds apparently was left unlocked by mistake Her Escape was discovered when a rou Winnie Ruth line room check showed her missing shortly before midnight The total amount of livcstpck managed by Fashion Farmnuid SIA for investors was more than million Additional trouble hit Fashion Farm Tuesday with the an nouncement that Max Warden Redding area farmer had filed a counter claim for damages to taling against it The suit counters a Fashion Farm suit against Warden for That suit was filed for j circumstances involving the ceding of 715 cattle on the iVarden farm during 1961 and 1962 The original Fashion Farm suit was filed in April Don Gorenson Clear Lake at orney for Fashion Farm said Tuesday that the companys or ginal suit against Warden was an attempt to regain possession of the animals In his counter suit Warden claims the cattle furnished him by Fashion Farm were infected with parasites and that 203 died on his farm during a ninemonth period from December 1961 to August 1962 Under his agreement with Fashion Farm Warden charges he was to receive 608 cattle from the compahy He was to feed the cattle and then deliver them to Fashion Farm He was to receive 14 cents for each pound of gain he claims In August of this year War den and Fashion the Cattle Owners to sell the remaining cattle The proceeds from this sale are be ing held up pending the outcome of the suits pute a monthlong strikewhich crippled rail trans portation in a large part of the Midwest After lengthy negotiations here with the aid government medi ators the strike was ended with agreement to submit the unsettled issues to binding arbitration dispute including and more generous layoff benefitprovisions were negoti ated The Crucial issues were sub mittedto Garrett who was chosen by President Kennedy as the neu tral man on the arbitration board Under the decision when the railroad wants to discharge teleg raphers it must give the union ad vance notice and discuss the matter But Garrett ruled that final ac tion was ultimately up to the rail road a management decision This principle enunciated earli er by a White House emergency board which examined the issues is one all the nations railroads have been seeking as a means oE ending what the carriers call featherbedding theirxterm for unneeded workmen Tuesdays arbitration is likely to tiave considerable weight in fu ture railroad manpower argu ments with other unions Garrett also ruled that railroad must give the un ion 90 days notice before abolish ing a job This decision on the length of notice required was the only one to which both Leighty and Heineman agreed employes should guaranteed 40 hours a week but this can be reduced by eight hours in any week for any day on which an employe fails to respond to a call for work The railroad can determine the number of ex tra employes several hundred teleg raphers already laid off by the railroad should not be entitled both to the layoff benefits recently negotiated and the claims for lay off benefits they have filed as grievances which are still pend ing Garrelt ruled that although a carrier can ahead with a pro posed job elimination despite un ion objections the union would not be precluded from opposing pro posals before regulatory agencies regarding elimination of jobs or service The and the union earli er had negotiated layoff benefits equal to 60 per cent of recent av erage earnings up to a period of five years based on seniority Instead of this furlough allow ance displaced workers could take a lump sum severance allowance on a maximum full years pay Employes transferred because of job elimination would be guaran teed equal pay for five years These provisions are retroactive to Jan 22 1958 The union had battled for the right to take t arbitration tr thirdparty decision any disagree ment between the railroad and   

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