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Mason City Globe Gazette: Saturday, October 6, 1962 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 6, 1962, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Doily Newspaper Edited for the MASON CITY GLOBE VOL 1M The newspaper Associated Press and United Press International Full Lease Wires that mokes all North lowans MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY OCTOBER 1962 HOME EDITION n e i g hbors 10c a Paper Consists of Two No 2Qf i Revolution n i I or land reforms Latin America has problem By BERT QUINT New York Herald Tribune News Service MEXICO CITY In Bahia State in Brazil one day recently a detachment of soldiers sent out to dislodge a group of peasants from farms they had seized was met by a hail of bullets The peasants preferred to die rath er than give up the land In Northwestern Mexico 18 000 of them Com munists but most of them hun gry farmers with no farms to a march toward Mexico City where they hoped to convince the President to give them some Authorities per suaded them to go back to their villages But they still do not have what they wanted and they are restless and desperate In Ahuachapan El Salvador a migrant farmer commented on the election of a new presi dent who had pledged to carry out the reforms of the Alliance for Progress All we can do is hope he said If he does what he has promised life will be better ior us If he doesnt well we cant be any worse off than we are now This is the way it is through out Latin America There is lit tle industry and agriculture is the principal way of life But since the days of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest the land has never been for the people It has belonged to the feudal barons who took it dur ing colonial times and to their descendants In Bolivia for example 63 per cent of the population owns 919 per cent of the arable land In Peru 16 per cent owns 76 2 per cent In Venezuela 17 per cent owns 745 per cent In Brazil it is just a little better 16 per cent owns 509 per cent That is the pattern across the hemisphere and Communist agitators are taking advantage of the thirst for land that never has been quenched President Kennedy was well aware of this when on March 13 1961 he proclaimed the Al liance for Progress A vast cooperative effort to satisfy the basic needs of the American people for homes work and land health and schools Perhaps more difficult than homes or work health or schools is the providing of land Where good land is available it is the property of a few wealthy terra tenientes land often absentee land lords In Panama 80 per cent of those who own the land do not work it in Paraguay the figure is 70 and in Venezuela 56 per cent To make matters worse 95 per cent of the arable land is not cultivated because the wealthy owners make enough from other parcels because the poor ones cannot obtain credit to do anything with it or simply because it cannot be reached This compares unfavorably with the world average of 7 per cent cultivation arable land and theUnited States average of 18 per cent Darkening the picture even more is the fact that population is growing faster than the areas incipient industry can provide jobs That means a greater number than ever will depend on the land land that as things stand now is not for them for their living in the years to come This then is the problem that the Alliance for Progress faces and the United States insists that the governments of Latin steps to solve it before they can be eligible for AUiance aid money There are two means of al leviating the situation if not of completely resolving it The simpler and least complicated politically is to open up new territory by irrigation improved and colonization of large groups to unpopulated areas But this takes tremendous amounts of money and by itself is not enough That leaves the explosive land reform one of the most controversial subjects ia Latin America today CHANCE of RAIN Iowa Occasional rain Saturday night heavy in west and south Sunday partly cloudy to cloudy with occasional show ers east Not so cool southwest Sunday Low Saturday night 5560 Outlook for Partly cloudy and warmer GlobeGazette Weather Data up to 8 am Saturday Maximum 54 Minimum 44 At 8 am 49 Sunrise Sunset 545 YEAR AGO Maximum 85 Minimum 43 Expect Nikita at UN WASHINGTON UPD The Kennedy administration believes that Soviet Premier Khrushchev is planning a grandstand play at the United Nations General As sembly late next month It will be Khrushchevs second appearance at the United Na tions The first in 1960 featured his shoepounding show His in coming here this time still is unclear to Western diplomats but they sus pect it is closely tied to the Ber lin and Cuban issues He may try to take advantage of what the Russians believe to be a certain Western weariness with the Berlin situation and try to drive a further wedge between the United States and those of its Latin American and European al lies who are less tough than Wash ington on Cuba That Khrushchev is coming to this country to attend the UN meetings now is generally ac cepted West Berlin Lord Mayor Willy Brandt put on the record what administration aides have been saying privately for days that he and President Kennedy took it for granted Khrushchev will come here the second half of No vember This assumption administration sources said is based on remarks Khrushchev made during talks with Agriculture Secretary Stew art L Udall and with President Kennedys friend poet Robert Frost Kennedy bids for ballots Campaigning in Midwest DETROIT AP President Kennedy picking up where he left i off in 19GO swept through Michi gan and into Minnesota Saturday with a familiar plea He needs a strong Democratic Congress he says to get this nation moving economically His busy schedule includes stops in Flint and Muskegon then its on to St Paul at night for a tradi tional bean feed dinner and tradi tional speechmaking This is Kennedys first big polit ical trip since he campaigned for the presidency in 1960 and he plans to hustle out each Friday for a long weekend of politicking until election day Nov 6 On the basis of his showing Fri day it would appear that Ken nedy is 1 Getting more zip into his ora tory as he begs Yor vbtes for oth ers than he did when he was working for himself in 1960 2 Sticking with a theme that he has used again and again that its the Republicans who are blocking legislation that would make this nation move faster 3 Drawing crowds as large or almost as large as those who turned out during the 1960 cam paign But these crowds are far more sedate No squealers few jumpers In Cincinnati Kennedy even ran into some hecklers As he spoke he looked out on placards held high that bore such sentiments as these We licked Mississippi How about Cuba Less profile more courage Blockade Cuba In an attempt to answer thes criticisms Kennedy said last administration ignored Latin America for eight years and we paid the price But mostly it was a repeated plea to elect Democrats coupled with scornful words for Republi cans Fulf operation by is restored CHICAGO UP The Chicago and North Western Railway has announced that full freight and passenger service has been re stored over its 10600 mile line following a monthlong telegra phers strike The announce ment made Friday said restori ation was completed Thursday FAMILYS ONEROOM SCHOOL The McHarry school is located seven miles north of Hanain sisters Martha Margret and Marcia listen to their McHarry a farmer c dnt like the idea of closing teacher Mabel Corey in the oneroom school which down the oneroom school their father Eugene McHarry bought for them The soho 1 so reported made for Cuban prisoners On the inside Clear Lake News Page 3 Editorials 4 The Surveyor5 Religious Features 67 Mason City News 89 Latest Markets 9 Society News 10 Sports 1M2 Comics 16 Business News1718 North Iowa News20 VETERAN FLIER DIES OLD WESTBURY NY WJ Frederick H Prince Jr 76 an original member of the Lafayette Sscadrille of World War I fame died in his home Friday PEER THROUGH THE WALL An American soldier peers through a hole m CommunistBuilt wall on the Berlin border after a West Berlin man yas shot by Communist border guards r Photofax Standing by is an American MP The man was shot by East Germans as he emerged from tunnel on east side of the border while attempting to assist refu gees through the escape route r Money and supplies for 1113 men MIAMIVia Ot The Miami News said Saturday that usually reliable Cuban exilesources re ported the Castrogovernment has released for return to the United States the 1113 prisoners taken in last years abortive Bay of Pigs invasion The newspaper said the prison ers would be landed at Miami International Airport and taken to the former Marine Corps air base at suburban OpaLocka for interviews and physical exami nations The newspapers sources said the Castro government was promised between and million worth of medicine food and other supplies in exchange Source of the suppjies was not disclosed For the past several days New York lawyer James B Donovan has been negotiating with Fidel Castro to work out a release Donovan was successful a year ago in the release of U2 pilot Francis Gary Powers from the Soviet Union In Washington State Depart ment spokesman said Donovans negotiations for release of the Cuban prisoners were a purely private not a governmental He said the depart ment does not know the status of the negotiations or the terms of the reported agreement Donovans negotiations have been going on for several weeks The money reportedly has been raised from subscriptions by Cuban refugees in this country and sympathetic business firms andorganizations While it is believed the entire amount has not been met there are sufficient quantities on hand to make the deal attractive to Castro Castro has been eager to com plete the trade since he has been saddled with caring for the prisoners Informants say the men have not been mis treated and are receiving ade quate food and shelter TARGET OF REDS BOGOTA Columbia handful of leftist students show ered US aid administratorTco doro Moscoso with stones toma toes and eggs Friday in a dem onstration of antiAmericanism Hi fm bock All in a days work LONDON Edward Tinald kissed his wife goodby and watched her leave for the maternity hospital in an ambulance It was pm At pm there was a knock on the door Tinald an swered and there smiling at him was his 33yearold wife and their new son A hospital spokesman explained there were no vacant beds in the maternity section and as we could not leave Mrs Tinald in the labor ward all night we asked her if would like to go home Tinald recovered from his surprise sufficiently to cook his wife supper SAME Department Fliure Bermuda in path of Hurricane Daisy MIAMI Daisy no longer a threat to the United States mainland bore down on the little resort island of Ber muda Saturday with winds up to 100 miles an hour Forty mile an hour fringe winds began brushing at the British island The Miami weather bureau warned that hur ricaneforce blasts wouldfollow N ews in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES Iron Curtain delegates VATICAN CITY The Iron Curtain was lifting to permit delegates from at least three Soviet bloc countries to attend the Second Vatican Council of the Roman Catholic Church Vatican officials welcomed the chance at personal contact with prelates from Hungary Poland Czechoslovakia Only Poland had been expected but officials were reported uneasy over the probability that some members of the Czech oslovakian delegationwere coming to watch the others Ben Bella at UN ALGIERS Premier Ahmed Ben Bella left for JNew York to lead hisdelegation into the United Na of his first official duties since winning the premiership Bomb rocks cathedral c2 Y9RK bomblike device exploded at the bt Patricks Cathedral residence of Francis Car dinal SpeJIman No one including the cardinal who was asleep on the second floor was injured when the blast blew out four basement windows Protests Red takeover ANCHORAGE Alaska Sen Ernest Gruening DAlaska asked President Kennedy to send at least two American destroyers to Alaska waters to halt an outrageous foreign aggression of a Russian fish ing fleet The 18boat Russian fleet moved in a week ago and forced American fishing boats to abandon the area Solons fail to adjourn Major bills still pending WASHINGTON AP Pea nuts pensions and pork have killed all hopes for final adjourn ment of Congress Saturday and hung a question mark on when it will quit Only half of the national legis lative a Saturday session The Senate closed shop until Monday Leaders tossed in the sponge Friday in their fight to finish tha session this week They set no new target date Anywhere from next Tuesday to next Saturday or beyond Sen ate Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield of Montana wryly told his colleagues House speaker John W Me Cormack DMass refused to risk a guess on adjournment as he or dered an unusual ses sion primarily to consider a com promise appropria tion bill containing for the foreign aid program This is a must administra tion bill and leaders were taking no chances on jeopardizing it for ack of a House majority next eek Many House members already iave left to campaign for reelec tion in next months congression al voting Many of them dont plan to return barring an emerg ncy Without a majority of its members on hand the House vould not be able to transact any major business next week The House took final action Fri day on one major measure It sent to thePresident a bill rais ing postal a pen ny increase for letters and post raising the pay of i 6 million postal and classified gov ernment employes by aa averake 10 to 11 per The House also sent to the Sen ate a resolutionsaying Congress avors the use of any means necessary to uphold Allied rights ui Berlin A technical objection blocked House action Friday on the an ual water projects bill common ly known as the pork measure because it authorizes hundreds of federal construction projects throughout the nation Sponsors dispute the description arguing the projects will produce benefits greater than their cost As passed by the House the measure carried billion for water projects but the sum was raised to billion by the Senate Without clearance from the Rules Committee the politically attractive bill cant get to a Sen ateHouse conference to reconcile the differences The Rules Com mittees chairman Rep Howard W Smith DVa appeared to be in no hurry to call a meeting for that purpose President Kennedys departure from Washington for a weekend of political barnstorming was al most enough in itself to keep Con gress around several more days He left without acting on a bill to give a tax break to selfem ployed persons who set up ap proved pension plans The pension bills backers fear a veto and are determined to keep Congress in session until the deadline for a presidential veto expires next Wednesday They are confident they can override a veto The peanut controversy swirls around a multibillion appropria tion for the Agriculture Depart ment The Senate added mil lion for research projects in sev eral states including a mil lion peanut marketing laboratory in Dawson Ga The House has re fused to go along with the Sen ate and no break in the stalemate is in sight The agriculture measure is one of six money bills that must be passed before adjournment The others carry funds for the foreign aid program the District of Co lumbia federal public works pro grams the Stale Justice and Commerce Departments and a group of miscellaneous agencies All but the latter measure have passed both branches but in dif ferent form This final moneybill has been cleared by the House only and cant be sent to the Sen ate floor before Monday Purely technical objections could block a Senate vote before Thursday the day now picked by congressional optimists for final adjournment   

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