Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 10, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 10, 1962, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspapei for tU Horn MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE The newsDooer f h n t u n i HOME EDITION VOL 102 newspaper that mokes all North lowons neighbors P MU ASON CUV OWA TUESDAY JULY 0 10c a copyThto Paper Consists of Two SectionsSection u s spurns Nikitas bid on Berlin Parley in Moscow a show Reds wooing the neutrals By RICHARD SPONG WASHINGTON The Rus sian position on disarmament might be likened to what some one has called a Bikini argu ment What it reveals is im jxntant what it conceals is vital For a number of reasons the World Congress for General Dis armament and Peace being put on in Moscow by the Russians and pacifist ultras from other lands can hardly be viewed as anything but a show One of the ultras is Britains Lord Russell The Congress comes really as a curtainraiser to a resumption of he 17nation disarmament talks at Geneva If the Russians have anything new and con structive to offer surely they will save it for the international rostrum The Geneva sessions reopen on July 15 the day after the Moscow show closes The West is reported to be preparing new concessions for Geneva These would involve playing down the role of the United States in inspection and control of disarmament Khrushchev is not expected to buy these certainly not before a new round of nuclear tests but it is hoped that they will find favor with the Geneva neutrals The neutrals also obviously are being wooed by the demon strations in Moscow As one US State Department spokes man puts it the Congress is a propaganda mechanism to demonstrate that the Soviets are on the side of the angels in fostering world peace However more may be in volved than the neutrals Rus sian scientists themselves are reported to be perturbed by the Soviet resumption of nuclear testing in the atmosphere last autumn They arc supposed to be particularly suspicious of government explanations of the necessity for setting off 25meg aton and 57megaton devices Khrushchev has never notice ably cultivated a reputation for consistency Nevertheless the Congress in Moscow poses a problem in regard to another round of nuclear tests that must have even the Soviet Premier slightly flummoxed Washington Sovietologists find it hard to understand why the Russians havent already re sumed testing in the atmos AND V TELEMETRY MODUt SOLAR CELLS TRAVELING WAVE TUBE NICKELCADMIUM BATTERY CUTAWAY DRAWING OF TELSTAR SATELLITE Communications satellite in orbit First test awai CAPE CANAVERAL Fla A switchboard satellite rock eted into orbit Tuesday as a pos sible first step toward a space relay system for swift world wide transmission of radio tele phone and television signals The National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced at am CST that the com plex Telstar satellite was in or bit It thundered away from Cape Canaveral at am atop a towering threestage TborDelta rocket phere If they open another round in the near future any postures of peace and goodwill made at the Moscow Congress discounted will be heavily There is also of course the possibility however remote that the Soviets would renounce future testing in response to an appeal from the Congress At any rate the Western world will listen with interest as Premier Khrushchev addresses the gathering in Moscow As for Geneva it would ap pear that the minimum hope is a better understanding among the neutrals of the Wests sincerity about disarmament the maximum real steps toward agreement The common sense point of view has been stated by Prof Seymour Mel man of Columbia University The greatest safety for man kind is to be obtained from the earliest even if partial dis armament agreements which First test may be seen live on television NEW YORK AP People around the nation may get to the first television transmission from the Telstar satellite Tuesday night at the same time as the communications experts making the initial test The test expected around pm CST will be available in stantaneously to the three televi sion networks from American Telephone and Telegraph Co re ceiving equipment at Andover Maine Whether they carry the trans mission at the time it is received from the satellite or tape record it for later showing is up to them the tryout is suc cessful The Columbia Broadcasting Sys tem said it expected to air the test live that is at the time it is made CBS has a news pro gram from to pm which could be interrupted as could a following halfhour show devoted to the Telstar project Broadcasting Co said that from pm to it would carry a show relayed from the satellite Officials scheduled the first communications experim e n t s with the satellite Tuesday night and if all goes well American television viewers this evening will see the first live TV pic tures beamed by satellite Within two weeks Telstar may serve as a relay point for the first live transatlantic television show and a number of telephone and radio experiments between the United States and western Europe The ThorDelta logging 10th straight satellitelaunching success blasted off exactly on schedule In Washington NASA said the orbit achieved by Teistar ap tJJ iui uic liUlull peared to be almost exactly as trict the same day n I H n i A planned The intention was to o VUC1UUUI send the satellite into a path Roman Hruska RNeb said h ranging from about 600 to 3500 would recommend approval miles in distance from the earth It was to complete every 160 minutes Preliminary calculations fndt cated the spacecraft was circling the globe every 1578 minutes to a grees compared inclination of 45 Officials of said they Praise for two Iowans Judgeships at stake WASHINGTON Senate Jufiiciary subcommittee heard nothing but praise Tuesday for resident Kennedys two nomi nees for federal district judge ships in Iowa But Sen Bourke B Hickenloop er IMowa who gave his un qualified endorsement to both nominations at a subcommittee learing said lack of Senate ac tion on a US attorney appoint ment for southern Iowa is ham pering efforts to reduce a backlog of court cases there H is highly desirable that this matter be resolved he said Hickenlooper referred to Ken nedys nomination last Jan16 of Donald A Wine to be US attor ney for the Southern District Hickenlooper also called it un fortunate that the President wail ed more than a year to select a nominee for the new roving low district judgeship Kennedy named William C Hanson 53 of Jefferson to tha post June 23 Edward J McMan us 42 of Keokuk was name judge for the Northern Iowa Dis Acting subcommittee Chairmai AllStar Game NL 000 002010380 AL 000001000140 Drysdiile Marichal 4 Purkey C Shaw 8 and GrandalJ Banning Pascual 4 Donovan 7 Pappus 9 and Battey Romano 7 Details on sports page both Hanson a Republican an a circuit McManus a Democrat before the end of the week Judari said can be ex by Hrusk an orbit ranging in altitude from f5 3 of om 593 at the low point to 3 502Tl FonductinS Tuesdays 35minute the high The angle of turn to the equator was 447 de Hanson said at the hearing thai planned he would spend much of his time n northwest Iowa He estimated loped to conduct their first test ransmissions to the satellite on about 12 hours the fifth orbit after launch If preliminary tests are pos sible at that time fullscale the backlog of cases in the North ern District at nearly 200 He de scribed the case load in the South ern District as very heavy Hanson is now a judge in the states IGlh Judicial District McManus who said he be within tu M satellite Uke place set up his home is ground stations on its sixth orbit and the next three succeeding ones for from 20 to 50 minutes each time Ground station in Europe the British station at Goonhilly Down near Falmouth England and the French station at Ple mourBodou in may attempt to receive the trans missions during some of the or bits Tuesday night Later they would t u VLlHwC JJ1 about 151 Rapids was lieutenant governor iof Iowa in 1959 and 1960 and later expected to an unsuccessful candidate for of the two governor News in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES Winnie has blood clot Doctors disclosed Sir Winston Churchill is suffering from a blood clot in his brok en left thigh A medical bulletin said There has been no extension of the thrombosis and the left leg is less swollen Until now the circulatory con dition m the 87yearold former prime ministers leg had been described as of a vein A thrombosis however is a blood clot in a vein or artery Soda sought PRAIRIE BU CHIEN service station operator wishes the thieves who made off with the contents of 13 soft drink bottles would return and tell him how they did it The soda was removed irom the bottles without taking the containers from the vending machine New blast by Goldwater WASHINGTON Sen Barry Goldwater R Anz said only the politically naive believe the new ly formed Republican National Citizens Committee will keep hands off party policy and candidate selec tions In a fresh blast at an organization former President Dwight D Eisenhower heads as honorary chairman Goldwater questioned whether members ot the citizens group are real Republicans franco to name deputy Francisco Franco 69 for the first time in his 25 years as head of the government of Spain will name a second in com mand official sources said In a reshuffling of his cabinet Franco has created the new post of vice president of the council of ministers Stock market in surge NEW stock market greeted news of a Federal Reserve Board cut in margin require ments with a surge of bigblock trading and rising prices for RELAYS SIGNALS Ground stations at Andover Maine and Holmdcl NJ are to be used first to test the Telstar communtcations satellite Voice data facscimilc and TV signals will be sent up to the satellite from Andover The satellite is to receive the signals amplify them and send them back to earth would serve to reduce interna tional tensions Such effects would facilitate in turn the ex tension of the scope and work ability of disarmament agree ments and their appropriate in spection methods SAME DATE19613IO Critics of foreign aid prepare surgical knife WASHINGTON AP House critics of foreign aid have sharp ened their knives over the pro gram and called for major sur gery They indicated Monday they want to amputate aid to Yugo slavia and Poland and to cut as sistance to India The programs supporters coun tered that such an operation would be dangerous to the health of the aid program which Presi dent Kennedy has described as vital to our security The carving would come in the form of amendments to the billion authorization measure House members paid scant attention Monday to the amounts involved aiming their major ar guments at expected amendments to limit aid to India and to forbid also will use the satellite transmission purposes If the initial trials are suc cessful the three major US television networks plan to pipe the program into American homes Tuesday night Because of he extraordinary microwave bandwidth require ments of television all 600 of Telstars channels arc needed for oneway television broad cast Transatlantic television now is impossible because there are only a total of 550 chan nels between North America and overseas points Telstar marks the first ven ture by private business into the space field Bell Telephone Laboratories of American Tele phone and Telegraph Co devel oped the satellite and is the National Aeronauticsand Space Administration million to launch and track its orbit On the inside Sen Jack Miller Rlowa en dorsed the two appointments He said both would carry on the high standards set for the federal bench and bar in Iowa McManus would succeed re tired District Judge Henry N Graven At the start of the hearing Hruska read into the record en dorsements of both men from the American Bar Associations Judi cial Committee and the Board of Governors of the Iowa State Bar Association North Iowa Partly cloudy to cloudy scattered showers and thunderstorms Tuesday night and Wednesday Warmer Tuesday night lows in mid 60s Highs Wednesday in mid 80s further assistance to any Commu nist country The Senate which has passed its foreign aid measure cut back the administrations Indian aid re quest of million to about million The foreign aid program is han dled annually in two bills The authorization bill now before the House spells out the programs scope and authorizes Congress lo finance it within limits The sec ond measure appropriates the money The Senate also curbed aid to Communist Poland and Yugo slavia which have been receiving US assistance under the theory that it would encourage independ ence from Moscow The administration has contendtm inmni IOOK OH Tuesday on cd that cutting off such aid wouldsurvey flight for a direct Moscow be a windfall for the Kremlin Havana run Page 4 North Iowa News 5 Society News 91011 Sports 1314 Clear Lake News 15 Latest Markets 16 Mason City News 1617 Comics g Farm Features l9 ROUTE SURVEYED MOSCOW m A giant Soviet TU114 worlds biggest commer cial plane took off Tuesday on i Iowa Partly cloudy scattered showers v and thunderstorms Tuesday night and Wednes day Warmer cast Tuesday night lows in the 60s Cooler north and extreme west Wed nesday highs near 80 north west to the 80s southeast Further outlook Partly cloudy scattered thunder showers and cooler southeast Thursday Minnesota Decreasing cloudi ness cooler Highs Wednes day in 70s GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 a m Tuesday Maximum Minimum At 8 a m Sunrise Sunset YEAH AGO 57 59 Maximum Minimum 82 52 Photofax HOMEMADE Fort Dodge boya con structed this tissuepaper balloon is 22 feet high and 15 feet in diameter The boys are Dave BHek 15 Scott RoJohn 20 and Jeff Brooks 15 They fashioned the balloon from 92 sheets of tissue paper and several bottles of glue The balloon was inflated with hot air over an outdoor barbecue and set free three times last week before it landed in the top of a tree several miles from the launching site in Bileks backyard The boys estimate the bal loon attained an altitude of between 300 and 500 feet on each flight Replace troops in city New threat of rockets MOSCOW AP Premier Khrushchev declared Tuesday that he war threat over Berlin has become ever more ominous and proposed that Western troops here be replaced with a garrison f NorwegianDanish or Belgian 3utch troops plus Czech and Po ish forces The proposal was made after he lad claimed much more powerful weapons than those of the United States said the Soviet Union has developed an antimissile missile and declared Western aggres sors would perish in a nuclear war The U S quickly rejected the troops proposal saying it was offered in private discussion some time ago and does not provide a satisfactory basis for negotiation Khrushchev denounced the cur rent series of American nuclear tests as a challenge to mankind and said further improvement of weapons by the Communist coun tries was now an unavoidable necessity He spoke on the second day of a World Peace Congress in the Kremlin About 2000 delegates rrom 118 countries are attending It was the first time the Rus sians have proposed posting fore es of the smaller European Com munist and Western powers in West Berlin in place of the Amer iican British and French garri sons The new plan obviously was an effort to get the big powers out of the way in Berlin and leave the Communists a freer hand Proposing the substitution of troops Khrushchev said If they dont agree to Norwegians and Danes then let it be Belgians and Dutch Khrushchev said the hotbed of war danger in the heart of Europe is becoming ever more ominous Jin Berlin West Germanyand its armed forces1 he charged are already becoming the backbone of the ag gressive forces of NATO His statement on US tests in the Pacific and the highaltitude hydrogen explosion Monday was unexpectedly mild Two speakers at the congress a Chicago pro fessor and a British Churchman had charged the Soviet Union with part of the responsibility for re sumption of tests by breaking a threeyear moratorium Khrusuchev said the major se ries of tests of the United States were a challenge to Highaltitude tests he said were disregarding the fact that these experiments may have very dangerous consequences for the conditions of mans life The world was in the shadow of catastrophe Khrushchev said be cause of the weight of armament and unless a disarmament plan is agreed upon the atoms will start speaking for themselves American claims that the mili tary balance of power has tipped in favor of the United States lie declared were nonsense and were being made only to put heart into their own armed forces and those of their allies Although the United States ranks first for its scale of war preparation he said mere was no reason to think the balance of strength has changed in their favor If the aggressors start a nu clear war he went on they will inevitably perish themselves in its flames His claim that the Soviet Union had developed an antimissile mis sile were in these words With due account of the fact hat the Soviet Union was forced o develop in the last few years nuclear weapons pf 50 100 and more megatons intercontinental rockets the global rocket which is practically impervious to ind an antimissile he said it will ho seen that the rui ng groups of tho United Statet lave no reason at all to nay M he balance of vtrcngthv tat changed in tbpir favor Sv   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication