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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 2, 1962, Mason City, Iowa                                Edited for T spapi e r t li a t m a a j I N o r f K 1 b wa n s i g h b MASON cmr MONDAY JULY aiiwi HOME EDITION One Mans 4 Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KOLO KWU3 WOt Qobur City lM BM One word makes a lot of difference T HAVEFELT FOR ALONG time that the surest way of communism is to know what communism really is This conviction I should add was deepened andintensi fied by my own firsthand gb servation of in threej Eas Germany and Russia itself As recently as a decade ago the suggestion that students should be taught about Marx ism prompted bristling objec tions among Americans Intro ducing the subject in high school would have been re garded as unthinkable The very idea was regarded as ing on treason Now alhlhat is in process of change Courses on communism are being taught in a rapidly growing number of high schools Impelled by a strong senseof urgency school authorities have been developing new course out lines assembling study materi als drawing1 up reading lists and issuing instructions to teach ers on this newly emphasized field of study In some cases school authori ties have acted under mandate of state legislatures but mostly state departments of education or local boards of education have taken the initiative Either way its clear that schools are responding growingde mand that the risinggeneration havea tbe eneniy with which the free world contends What to be instinctive opposition to enter ing this field resulted from a sadly mistaken assumption The fear was that our schools woulc be teaching communism There was a failure to understand that they would be teaching ABOUT communism And whal a world of difference there is between teaching ABOUT com munism and TEACHING com munism between teaching ABOUT communism and advo cating communism Significant reflection of the new turn of mind has been pro vided by a reversal of position on the subject by such organ izations as the American Bar Association and the American Leglon Both groups are now on recordas favoring such instruc tion Indeed both have insti tuted programs on their own to forward that objective While the high school level is generally favored there are communities in which the pu to the nature of communism is begun in a low er grade Thats a problem Which I personally have always been content to leave with the educators I frankly dont know the answer In Washington D C and In Indianapolis youngsters get their first Contacts withJ the subject at the sixth grade level Geography and cultural charac teristics of the USSR are touched on in social studies courses As the subject unfolds the pupils are introduced to the contrasts between the commu nist and the democratic ap proach to such things tion religion social justice movement of population elec tions freedom of speech press and assembly arrest and search trial jury private property and trade unions The primary purpose ofthe instruction is to strengthen the individual pupils understanding and appreciation of American democracy and to arm him ideologically for any direct en counter with communism or Communists Its our answer to Iho much talked about com munist war for the minds of youth Tn SoVIet Union s a major instrument for mold ing tho people to the needs of the Communist stale From the beginning of theMarxist regime In Russia there has been a heavyaccent on wiping out the ijTurn H 2 PIMM 10c a Paper Consists ol Two AND THEN THERE WAS Miller 32 servinga life term for murder peers from a water tower at Western State Penitentiary in Pittsburgh where he remained the Jone holdout against alleged prison brutality Two other prisoners including AP Kobert Payne 29 who started the demonstration came down Monday Payne climbed the tower last Monday and was joined by 12 other prisoners Tues day No U S If IS Ch WASHINGTON tary of State Dean Rusk Mon day 1 a b e 1 e d as nonsense charges by Soviet Premier Khrushchev that aggressive US circles were supporting a possible Nationalist Chinese at tack against the Red mainland Rusk told newsmen after a twohour closeddoor meeting with the House Foreign Affairs committee that this country has urged the abandonment of force in settling matters in the Forrnosan straits Asked for his reaction to Khrushchevs warning that any attack on RedChina would meet with a crushing rebuff from the entire Communist bloc Rusk saidthat type of comment should be expected if the Sino Soviet security pact meant any Khrushchev accused Chinese Nationalist leader Chiang Kai Shek of preparing to mount an invasion of the Chinese main land with support of ag gressive circles of the US Reaffirming Soviet Chinese friendship as an unbreakable Senate opens its big guns over Medicare N ews in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES 2 bills signed into law Kennedy has signed into lawbills raising the public debt limit to billion and extending for three years his authority to curb trade with unfriendly nations Wants officials fired WASHINGTON Texas Atty Gen Will Wilson says Undersecretary andfour other AgricultureDepartment officials should be fired for granting to Billie Sol Estes Wilson also ex that Secretary of Agriculture Orville shouldresign f or lack of prompt action in the Estes scafidall jt Vetoes reapportionment plan MADISON Wis Gov Gaylord Nelson vetoed Republicanbacked bills to reapportion Wisconsinand the issue appeared headed into the federal courts Nelson a Democrat who hopes to go to the U S Sen ate nextfall said the GOP plan toreapportion Wis consins Congressional and legislative districts was a shameful political gerrymander Party split among governors HERSHEY Pa Democratic governors re ported majority support for a program of medical care for the elderly financed through Social Security But they split wide open as usual on thequestion of a declaration on civil rights Republican state ex ecutives meeting in a separate caucus in this politics packed 54th annual exactly reversed the Democrats stand j Another high Attest planned HONOLULU The United States will makea third try at exploding its biggest and highest atmos pheric nucleau shot of the current Pacific series on Wednesday night the Fourth of July above Johnston Island Two previous tests failed when rocket or tracking systems malfunctioned Iowa tax receipts climb million DES MOINES AP Revenue rom the states various taxes for he fiscal year which ended June 30 totaled more than million an increase of more than mil lion over the previous 12 months Measure to face rough sledding WASHINGTON Sen ate f began debate Monday on one of the momentous issues of the 1962 care for the aged financed under the Social Security System Assistant Democratic Leader Hubert H Humphrey of Minne sota told a reporter he was con fident a tg establish such a system wbulc clear the Senatebythe end of the week despite a Fourth of July break Wednesday Sponsors claimed a good mar gin for the health program and said a number of Republicans would vote for it However many Republicans and some Southern Democrats remain opposed to So cial Security financing Even if the measure clears the Senate it would face rough days ahead The House Ways arid Means Committee hasrefusedto act on the administration measure for more than a year and obsta cles to House action would be formidable The House has arranged to pass an atomic energy authorization bill Monday or Tuesday then adjourn for the holiday Wednes day with no business scheduled or the rest of the week A compromise sugar sion billpassed by the House Saturday also comes up in the Senate Monday The measure may be cleared for President Ken nedys signature by nightfall The Social Security health plan willbe offered by Sen Clinton P Anderson DNM as an amend ment to Housepassed bill amending the public assistance law Democratic leaders are anxious not to delay the House bill for long because a number of its pro visions extend v programs which txpired Saturday midnight the Dr Roy leader in India dies at 82 CALCUTTA Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy 82 Indias best known physician and prominent political figure died on his birthday here Sun day Roy the chief minister of the state of NVest Bengal for many years heldHhe unique po sition of doctor and political consultant to most of Indias top political leaders SAME I i k Figures released Monday by the state treasurers office indicated most of the increase resulted from big jumps in liquor profit and individual state income taxes Total revenue for the yearjust ended was 1305313053 This com pares with for the 196061 fiscal year Liquor profits increased from million in the 196061 year to million for the year just ended The State Liquor Control Com mission increased retail liquor prices by 3 per cent a year ago Total revenue from income taxes increased from to Individuals paid in state income taxes in the year just ended com pared to in the previ ous year but corporationincome taxes dropped from to i i 4 Gasoline decreased from to The use ax dropped more than million from to Increases In cigarette Maxes were beer taxes insurance taxes and road use taxes end of fiscal Andersons proposal worked out after prolonged negotiation with five Republican senators agree to cosponsor it along with 17 Democrats contains tbe same benefits as the administrJion bill pushed earlier this Congress These include lospitalization nursing home care home health services and outpatient hospital diagnostic services They be financed by a onefourth per cent increase in the Social Security payroll tax on both employers and employes In i960 a similar plan to fi nance health benefits for the na tions elderly through higher So cial Security taxes failed to win approval by seven votes with only one Republican Sen Clifford P NJ supporting it on the GOP side Democrats felt the ad ditional GOP backing this time might give President Kennedy the margin he needs JKEDAWiNS L TOKYO W Prime Minister Hayato Ikcda whocaughtthe popular imagination last with his plan ito double won Japans weathervane u p p e r house election North Iowa Scattered showers occasionaithimd e r s tor m s Monday night lows iyjuuuajf iijgui iuwo iicaimeni was in 60s Partly cloudy Tuesday by most of Saskatchewans 700 provided by about 240 volunteer scattered afternoon showers private doctors swept this provdoctors at 34of the provinces 120 nee of 925000 people Monday as hospitals but officials warned warmer highs in upper 80s Iowa Partly cloudy southwest mostly cloudy elsewhere Mon day night occasional rain northeastand scattered show ers thunderstorms east am south in 60s Partlj cloudy Tuesday widely scat tered showers and thunder storms highs 80s1 northeast t near 90 southwest Furthe outlook Partly cloudy Wed nesday scattered showers an thunderstorms southeast cool er northwest FiveDay fowa Temperature will average near norma Tuesday through Saturday Normal highs are 8 to 88 and normal lows 61 to 67 I will be mild until turning a little cooler about Thursday Warmer again Saturday Rain fall will be moderate to heavy averaging onehalf inch to an anch in intermittent showers thunderstorms Minnesota Variable cloudiness showers warmer Highs Tues day near 90 GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Monday Maximum 80 Minimum 64 Precipitation 193 Sunrise Sunset GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Sunday Maximum 82 Minimum 63 Condemned men give up meekly SAN QUENTIN Calif Six condemned murderers sawed heir way out of the cells on San Juehtin Prisons death row early Monday clubbed two guards and beld them hostage for three hours aefore surrendering meekly after prison officials lobbed tear gas into the cell block The guards were hospitalized with head injuries after their re lease Associate Warden Dale B Fra dy in an interview said the pris oners had sawed their bars over a period of time and disguised the cuts On the inside Editorials Page 4 Clear Lake News o Society News 89 Mason City News 1011 Latest Markets 11 Spirts 1314 North Iowa News 15 Comics 16 with a surplusof men the hal Council of Social Scry ce said Monday There already moremenV than iWpmen in 15 age group it said n by the year 2000 there will jbeepOpOO more men thanwomen in this group 700 doctors in Canada on strike REGINA Sask strike1 he Socialist provincial govern ment launched the first big com pulsory medical insurance plan in North America Charging that the plan opens the door to government control over theirprofession doctors took of on vacationerquitthe province Most offices and clinics were closed for the Dominion Da holiday Monday but many dis played signs saying they would re main shut Physicians said they would not give medical advice by telephone and would make house calls only in dire emergencies The government medical and the doctors ef fect Sunday Marble Rock crash fatal MARBLE Richard Schmitt 27 son of Mr and Mrs George Schmitt Marble Rock area farmers was killed in a one carcrash near here between mid night and 4 am Sunday Schmitt was killed when the car te was driving went through a T ntersection one mile northeast of farmer discovered shortly after 8 am here A vreckage lunday Funeral services will be Wed nesday at 10 am at St Marys Ihurch Rosevjrtle with the vic ims brother the Rev Phillip Schmitt C r e s c o officiating Jurial will be in St Marys Cemetery the Hauser Funeral Home Charles City in charge Other survivors include a brother Marvin Evanston 111 and two sisters Dolores Evans ton and Mrs John Bouchon ille Palatine 111 Free emergency treatment was hey may be unable toextend this service beyond two weeks Authorities began moving emer iency and chronic cases to the 34 hospitals The hospitals sak they were busy but were not over loaded One fatality an infant wasrjrepprted Tenmonthold Carl Derhousof f believed suffering from meningi tis died Sunday night enroute from his home in Usherville to an treatment center in Yorkton 75 miles away The provincial government said it would call on some of the 110 doctors in the public health serv ice if they were needed to help in the emergency The Medical Care Commission set up to administer the new in surance plan began bringing in doctors from outside the province o staff hospitals and to serve in communities where local doctors lave walked out Four doctors arrived from Brit f o re Khrushchev recalled similar Soviet warnings the height of the 1958 tension in the Formosa strait warnings that Russia was on the side of Red China Nowwe are saying again that anyone who will dare to make an attack on the Chinese peoples republic will meet a crushing rebuff from the great Chinese people the Soviet peoples and the entire Socialist camp Khrushchev said The Soviet premier spoke n the wake of reports that the Chinese Communists hadmoved strong reinforcements to the mainland coast opposite the Na tionalist offshore islands of Que moy and Matsu Khru s h c h e v s 31minute speech was the toughest warn ing yet from the Kremlin on the situation in the China Formosa area In the speech billed as a report to the people on his recent Romanian visit Khrush chev accused the west of prepar ing a new world war and stock piling weapons of mass annihila tion The premier said the creation of a Laotian coalition govern ment proved that difficulties could be overcome and issues settled peaceably if the desire were present Dwelling at length on the 11 AW Formosa strait tension Khrush chey said Chiang KaiShek lives off American imperal ism ain More are expected The dispute has been raging for 30 months over the plan which s financed by taxes and personal premiums The program modeled after Britains national health service provides for all medical services except drugs dental work eye glasses diagnosis and treatment of cancer and hospHalization Hospital costs are covered un ler a separate government plan Cancer treatment is provided by he provinces cancer clinic All Saskatchewan residents ex cept those covered by federal medical plans must register for he provincial medical care plan Premiums are a year for a single person and for families These will pay only part of the estimated million annual cost of the plan A 5 per cent sales ax and other taxes will supply he rest He added one couk think allrjiesehprovocaf tions are beiug fmade indepent dently by Chiang are leaning on the support of aggres sive circles of the Soviet premier said AH is quiet as Algerians OK pact ALGIERS CAP Algerias Moslems triumphantly celebrated their hardwon independence Mon day paying little heed totian open split between their leaders that promised more trouble for the new nation Throughout the country Algeri ans flocked to the polls Sunday to vote a virtually unanimous yes to independence and collab oration with France Many thous ands of Europeans reluctantly joined in the vote Many towns registered not a sin gle no vote The final result wasexpected to be close to 99 per cent affirmative The vote set a sweeping seal of approval online Evian ceasefire agreement that ended the bitter 7V5year Algerian war It did not yet make Algeria an independent nation legally The seperation from France will be formally decreed by President Charles De Gaulle when the final results of Sundays referendum are known probably within two or three days RULER OF NEW NATION them is Jin Burundi which becanieim iiidepehdent nation and his ife leave church in Usumbura Burundi With i m VTV quickly recognizca themi   

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