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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: March 19, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - March 19, 1962, Mason City, Iowa                                North Iowas Daily Newspaper Edited for T h e VOL 102 J ClTYGLOBE neWspoper that makes 11 N or th lowans MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY MARCH 19 1962 neighbors OOc a Paper Consists of Two SectionsSection HOME EDITION One M tins Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Globe Gazette Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE pm Sun KWLO Decorah pm Sun WOI Ames filOl Xues WTAO Quincy pm Tburs WSUI City 910 am Sat Rough path for our air transport too LONG AGO I DWELT on the troubles facing our roubles caused large ly by competing modes of trans portation Among these were the airlines which have come into popular favor by reason of their speed Now I regret to report it i the airlines that are in trouble financial trouble Their earnings have dipped for sev eral years and in 1961 our 11 trunklines showed a joint deficit of million Barring a sudden spurt of passenger traffic the condition of our airlines is likely to get worse before it gets better The reasons given for this are sev eral and conflicting The ait carriers and the Civil Aero nautics Administration the fed eral agency are of two minds the cause and the cure Airlines put major blame on government Stuart G Tipton president of the Air Transport Association and chief spokesman for the industry last summer proposed these five steps to al leviate the situation 1 Eliminate the 10 per cent tax on airline passenger travel 2 Curtail competition from the Military Air Transport Serv ice r 3 Terminate the government policy of seeking transportation from certified carriers at the cheapest 4 Restrict foreign arilines1 access to American airports and thus reduce competition from that source 5 Put air contract carriers under Civil Aeronautics Boarc Regulation The government agency in contrast views the plight of the airlines as caused largely by overcapacity and too many flights Chairman Alan S Boyc has declared that the airlines have added greatly to their ex penses by acquiring far more equipment than is needed Airline executives admit tha one of Hie causes of their troubles is that more and more travelers are shifting from first class to the cheaper coacl accommodations Coach service introduced by the domestic trunk lines a decade ago costs about 25 per cent less than first class service Coach traffic account for 58 per cent of passenger miles In an effort to check this trend several air carriers ap plied for fare increases aver aging 5 per cent applicable mostly to coach travel CAB authorized a 3 per cent boost for both first class and coach It is estimated will bring of additional revenue a year But these higher fares were FIRST LADY TAKES ELEPHANT HIDE Jacqueline Kennedy her hair p hgh old seat tb Tf fTi u goict seat with the First Lady is her Photofax sister Princess Lee Radziwill The eightfoot tall elephant is painted and decorated and wears false wooden tusks to impress the public authorized for only six months because CAB doesnt consider fare increases as the answer to the industrys long range prob lems More is involved CAB reasons so Airfines have also tried called promotional fares such as shuttle service between New York and Boston and between New York and Washington Un der this plan no advance reser vations were required These promotional efforts have only served to hold down the hoped for revenue increases One solution advanced by the airline industry is the same as that sought by re sort to mergers A plan to merge American and Eastern Air Lines however was greeted by a burst of protest from mem bers of Congress labor leaders and officials of competing air lines Only two weeks earlier Chairman Boyd of CAB had sug gested that consolidation offered a promising avenue for solu tion of airline problems But so much opposition arose that merger plans were dropped at least for now Theres agreement that the major troubles of the airlines can be traced to the introduc tion of jets to replace propeller driven planes Several hundred Torn to 2 Please North Iowa Partly cloudy to clear and cooler Monday night lows in the 20s Partly cloudy and warmer Tuesday with chance of showers south highs in the 40s Iowa Considerable cloudiness with scattered showers ex treme south Monday night and east and south Tuesday Slow ly rising temperatures Lows Monday night 20s northwest to near 40 southeast Highs Tues day 40s northeast to near 60 southwest Further Partly cloudy tered thundershowers south east not much change in temperature Wednesday FiveDay Iowa Temperatures will average near or slightly above normal through Satur Normal highs 44 to 51 Normal lows 26 to 33 Warm er weather will move into Iowa Tuesday but it will turn cooler about Thursday Pre cipitation will average mod erate to heavy occurring as scattered thunderstorms Tuesday and again Wednes d a y night or Thursday Amounts will be onehalf to one inch Minnesota Partly cloudy little temperature change Highs Tuesday in high 30s GlobeGazette weather data 35 19 01 up to 8 am Monday Maximum Minimum Precipitation Sunrise Sunset GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Sunday Maximum 34 Minimum 9 Charles Cityan dies as result of crash injuries CHARLES CITY Carl Leroy Boggess 35 Charles City sales man died at a hospital here Sun day of serious head injuries he received Friday evening on High News in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES More freedom for Okinawa WASHINGTON President Kennedy granted more self government to Okinawa andreaffirmed U SIntentions to eventually return sovereignty over the onetime Pacific battleground to Japan n Ballots counted in Russia MOSCOW An estimated 137 million voters cast ballots for a single slate of Communistapproved candidates for the Soviet parliament Based on past performance more than 99 per cent of the voters are expected to approve the handpicked slate including Premier Khrushchev Results probably will be an nounced Tuesday Orders end to demonstrations FORT POLK La Maj Gen Harley B West ordered 15000 reservists on active duty at Fort Polk to stop we want out demonstrations He said the demonstrators have started reviling President Ken nedy and Congress and he fears a riot Mattress found at sea CLARK AFB Philippines A search ship was reported to have picked up an air mattress in the general area of the Pacific where a missing Ameri can airliner carrying 107 persons last radioed its po sition L Slugged so hard that gun broke EAST DUBUQUE 111 A gunman slugged a rk so hard he broke his pistol Muriel Accola 40 was struck on the head four or five times and 26 stitches were required to close thewound Princess Grace to make a movie for a friend Let No 33 u B a I4 antonehalf miles spokesman for MONTE CARLO Grace of Monaco is due in Hollywood in late summer to resume her movie career in a thriller based on t h e suspense novel Mamie by English wriler Winston Graham Princess Grace the wife Prince Rainier of Monaco is the former Grace Kelly of the movies Annou n c e m en t made vest of CharlesCity the prince who T llle jjiujce wn Investigating officers said the said the prin Boggess car w a s going west 1 j skidded sideways went 52 feet vithout touching the ground then bounced again about 30 feet and struck a power pole Funeral services will be Wed nesday at pm at the First Baptist Church Burial will be n Sunnyside Memory Gardens vith military rites at the grave side conducted by the VFW and Legion Mauser Fu neral Home is jn charge cess will make the film with director Alfred GRACE Hitchcock Grace and Rainier were mar ried on April 19 1956 She has two children a son Prince Al bert and a daughter Princess Caroline she is the Princess dc Chateau Porcicn twice a duchess nine times a countess three times a marquise and six times a bar oness The announcement said Grace will return to Monaco in Novenv ber after completing the film but gave no other details The announcement from the palace said the princess would take advantage of a vacation in the United States to make the film According to an official spokes man for the prince Rainier will most likely be present during part of the filming depending on his schedule Friends safd the princess agreed to make the film out of friendship with Hitchcock andi had no intention of returning to a regular film career HAS HEART ATTACK EXETER N H us negotiate Atest R u s s Strikes follow Algeria pact An official closing to 7year war Secret Army still loose ALGIERS ceasefire ending the savage Algeri an nationalist rebellion went into effect at noon Monday But the third force in the ordeal of Algeria the European Secret Army struck back with crippling general strikes and terrorist attacks Vowing to keep Algeria French he secret armys call for a 24 hour strike halted all but essential services in Algiers and brought business to a standstill in Oran Algerias second largest city The underground army warned the real fighting was just beginning Terrorist attacks erupted in Algiers despite reinforcements of French soldiers sent into the city Gunfire andexplosions rang through Oran where AP corre spondent Rodney Angove said no French troops were seen in the center of the city Authorities gave no casualty figures Oran a rightwing stronghold had all communications cut with France by seciet army saboteurs Angove reported He said all stores were closed as Europeans rallied to the secret armys strike calf Air France and Air Algeria canceled all flights from France to Algeria because airport person nel in Algiers and Oran joined the general strike Fugitive exGen Raoul Salan HERBERT R OHRT ALL1N W DAKIN Ohrt Dakin given top scouting award A Mason Cityan and a formerjization As chairman he be Mason Cityan were among three lowans presented the Silver An telope Boy Scoutings highest award in a ceremony Sunday night at Wichita Kan The award dinneraddressed by John E Dolibois of Oxford Ohio was aVhighlight of thi threeday convention of Region 8 of the Boy Scouts of America The regional convention is be ing attended by GOO adult scout ers from the states of Kansas Missouri Nebraska Iowa Colo rado and Wyoming Honored were these Silver Antelope recipients Herbert R Ohrt Mason City iugjuYt txuen naouj saian j t head of the secret army a executive lis Fnrnnpar as Served the SCOUt IC iis European followers on a war footing Sunday even as President Kas executlve committee Charles de Gaulle was annnnnrino member vice chairman and the ceasefire agreement and rea cua ng Frenchmen and Moslem alike C Ioeal COUnci1 to forget their differences The secret army has called the ceasefire agreement betrayal and its announced campaign to service area chairman and on the local council level has served as board member com mittee chairman commissioner and president AJlin W Dakin Iowa City ad UOIMM mwd viTy aa challenge DC Gaulles authority ministrative dean of the State brought uneasiness among AlgeriUniversity of Iowa was an an nationalists who signed the Eagle Scout in his youth He agreement with France at Evian served one local council as vice The ceasefire has not brought President and another as presi peace to Algeria declared Al fe a momKnC gerian nationalist Premier Ben Youssef ben Khedda whose group vill share with France the main jurden of ruling turbulent Algeria until a selfdetermination vote this charts the territorys summer uture There still are enemies of i n 11 vui 11VIUV As the wife of RainierGraceWesley H Powell 46 who suf is one of the most titled women fercd a mild heart attack was in the world today In addition reported in satisfactory condi to being the Princess of Monaco tion Monday peace there he said in Rome en from Tunisia to Morocco referred to groups whose nterest it is to sabotage the peace Throughout Algeria the Mos em majority was under orders rom its leaders to refrain from demonstrations or contacts with uropeans that might lead to disorders In an order of the day Gen lharles Ailleret French supreme commander in Algeria told the French army to continue to make sure that disorder docs not whoever are those who would attempt to unleash it again He also paid tribute to the Al erian nationalists who fought the war that cost the lives of 17250 French soldiers and 141 000 Moslems He called the rebels an adversary frequently exalted but always courageous On the inside Editorials page 4 Society News North Iowa News 13 Latest Markets 14 Mason City News 1415 Comics Clear Lake News W NEW CARDINALS VATICAN CITY ttfi Pope John XXIII created 10 new cardinals Monday None from the United States was dent Dakin is a member of the regional executive committee Active also in Rotary Interna tional he has been club presi dent district governor and in ternational director and vice president Dakin was born reared and educated in Mason City Raymond A 1 v i n Kennedy Sioux City manufacturing ex ecutive serves his home area as council commissioner and previously has held the posts of council president and vice president The three men previously had received silver Buffalo Awards Monday Ohrt received anoth er honor when he was elected chairman of the Region 8 organ omes the volunteer head of al Scouting activities in the 6stat area He succeeds Jo Stong Keosauqua in the chairman ship As chairman of the regio he also becomes a member c the national executive commi tee Ohrt is executive vice pres dent of Lee Radio Incorpor ated the parent organization o the Forward Group of station and includes besides KGLO Radio and TV in Mason City radio broadcasting station in Quincy III and television sta ions in QuincyHannibal Man kato Minn and Madison Wis Ohrt has been an active Scout er in the Winnebago Counci since 1944 when he became mate of a Sea Scout Ship and squad leader of Air Scouts He has served two terms as presides of the Winnebago Council anc or the past three years he has served as chairman of the Hawkeye Service Area which embraces the Scouting program or the entire state It was the first time in Re ion 8 that the Silver Antelope vent to Scouters from one state The Silver Antelope Award has been presented to only two ther Mason Cityans They are udge William P Butler in 1948 and the late M C Lawson in 950 Both of these latter served is members of the regional ex iculivc committee and Butler till serves on that committee SAME VDay One minus one Oral polio vaccine facts VDay One in Mason City is Tuesday Purpose To give the oral Sahin polio vaccine to 30000 persons Anyone may take the vaccine The clinics are not limited to Mason City or Cerro Gordo County residents Charge 25 cents a dose Clinic sites for public All Mason City schools except the Mason City High School and the Mason City Junior College the YWCA and a building at 1st and N Federal Forms to be filled out before receiving the vac cine are available at clinic sites and at Wicks Phar macy Key Rexall Drug Medical Arts Pharmacy and Park Clinic Pharmacy Mason City Junior Chamber of Commerce and the Cerro Gordo County Medical So ciety See story page 15 Outlook at Geneva brightens But demands remain stiff GENEVA AP The Soviet Union announced Monday it was to negotiate with the United States and Britain on a nuclear est ban treaty But it stood firm against allowing international in spection teams on its soil The action opened new pros pects of EastWest talks on the deadlocked issue although it did lot resolve any of the differences blocking a treaty If agreement an be reached on a test ban pact President Kennedy has an nounced he will cancel next months scheduled start oa a new eries of US atmospheric tests The Russian announcement was made by Deputy Soviet Foreign Minister Valerian Zorin at a news conference His statement coin cided with information from West ern delegations that the United States and Britain have finally agreed on concessions to offer Russia in an effort to meet Soviet objections to international inspec tion The offer probably will be made Tuesday It is understood that the Western pouers would reduce the lumber of inspection trips which earns of international inspectors could make around the Soviet Union Much Soviet territory also vould be eliminated from any in pection at all British Foreign Secretary Lord Home returned to Geneva from veekend consultations in London vith Prime Minister Harold Mac Tiillan Allied diplomats said they elieved Macmillan had been in ouch with Kennedy on nailing town the concessions Macmillan s said to be even more anxious ban Kennedy to show that if the US tests are held every possible ffort was made to avoid them Zorin said the Soviet Union vould like to negotiate here with he United States Britain and on a nuclear test ban The great powers would form a ubcommittee of the 17nation isarmament conference Since France is boycotting the onference Zorin said Russia was also ready to continue negotia ions among the three powers At the news conference Zorin also 1 Said the Soviet draft treaty or total disarmament by three tages in four years should be the asis for negotiations here espe ially since he said the United tates has not laid down a com lete treaty proposal 2 Rejected the proposal ad anced by US Secretary of State ean Rusk last week that Russia nd the United States each trans ei50000 kilograms ofnuclear ex losive material to a stockpile or peaceful uses Zorin said that lould be done only at a time nuclear weapons came un er a total ban 3 Declined to say whether Rus a would walk out of the disar mament talks if and when Ken edy starts nuclear explosions in ie atmosphere assuming there no test ban treaty meanwhile 4 Declared that national in pection systems for detecting uclear explosions are sufficient o police a test ban treaty This the heart of the treaty dispute he United States insists interna onal inspectors must be admit d to the Soviet Union DOGS POISONED PRICHARD Ala ast 18 dogs died over the cekend from poisoned frank furters and police hunted their killer fearful the fatal bait might fall into childrens hands   

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