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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, October 31, 1961 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 31, 1961, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper for Hit Hent ON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE The news po per that mokes all North I owans neighbors VOL and United Prew International Full Wirei MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY OCTOBER 31 1961 7c a Paper ef Two SectionsSection One NO IT Nikita jests Ablast bigger than planned MOSCOW j Premier Khrushchev declarec Tuesday the giant bomb exploded Monday exceedec the 50megaton calculation of the scientists but we wont get angry with them for this The statement was made in a brief speech at the closing session of the Communist party congress in the Kremlin It was the first announcement in Russia that the bomb had been ex ploded and even then it was made first only to a restrictec Russian civilians are calm Civil defense not stressed By HENRY SHAPIRO MOSCOW would you do if a nuclear war started said Ivanto Dmitri I would get into a shroud and walk slowly toward the ceme tery replied Dmitri Why slowly said Ivan In order to avoid panic an swered Dmitri This grim joke is typical of the sophisticated toward civil Russians attitude defense There ap nuclear weapons did pears to be little widespread civil defense preparations here and lit tle public interest in such prep arations At least part of this at titude is due to the general feel ing that there can be no defense in a nuclear war The Soviet press treats Ameri can civil defense ing shelterbuilding as hys teria Many Russians seem to agree This does not mean Soviet au thorities neglect the problem There are reports that shelters exist for top government offices and ministries and important in dustrial plants But no foreign observer has seen any shelters The average citizen is unaware of the exist ence of shelters in contrast to the period before World War II when most apartment houses had improvised basement shelters Moscow subway stations some of which are very deep under ground were used as bomb shel ters during the war But most of them were built in the midthir ties when not exist There are subways only in Mos cow Leningrad and Kiev and they could accommodate only a fraction of the population of the three largest cities in the Soviet Union Ventilation systems of the sub ways are prewar and entrances are wide open There is no pro vision for storing food or water Considerable alteration would be necessary to make the subways immune to radioactive fallout The last time this correspond ent heard air raid sirens here was in 1943 when German troops were several score miles from the capi tal There have been no public drills or alerts since before the war when whole factory crews and school student bodies walked the streets in gas masks It is possible that key factories occasionally have drills but they are unknown to the general pub lic Nor is there anything com parable to the practice alerts in the United States which the So viet press ridicules as artificially fostered mass hysteria A dozen Soviet citizens on the street were questioned about what they would do if nuclear war started suddenly Most shrugged their shoulders in surprise as if to say are you out of your mind Others indignantly muttered something to the effect he must be an Amer ican provocateur Housing in Russia is largely a state enterprise and the state ap pears too busy with a fantastic housing program to worry about shelters Cellars of new eight to 10floor housing compounds are too shallow and two small for conversion into shelters There has been no campaign for homebuilt shelters nor have stores advertised doityourself kits If a private individual wanted to build a shelter he would have considerable trouble finding bricks cement nails or wood However there have been sev eral books and pamphlets on the dangers of radiation and what to if and when exposed to it session of tue congress The scientists made a slight mistake in the evaluation of the bomb Khrushchev said It proved somewhat bigger than 50megatons but we wont ge angry with them for this The announcement brought a storm of applause of cheering and some laughter from the cpri gress Khrushchev quickly calmed the delegates with a warning that to achieve the program we will need work work and only work The statement was made to the full membership of 4500 with no Western foreign correspondents present Earlier in the brief concluding session Ekaterina Furfseva only woman member was droppec from the Presidium ruling group of the party There was no explanation She presumably retains her job in the government as minister of culture Premier Khrushchev was re elected the partys first secretary Also dropped from the Presid ium was Nuritdin Mukhitdinov only representative of the Asian peoples in the USSR Reelected to the Presidium were Khrushchev President Leonid I Brezhnev party Secretary Fro R Kozlov First Deputy Premier A N Kosyginparty Secretary 0 V Kuusinen First Deputy Pre mier Anastas I Mikoyan N V Podgorny first secretary of the Ukrainian Communist party D S Polyansky the Russian Republic premier party Secretary Mikhail A Suslov and N M Shvernik chairman of the partys Contm Commission Chrysler studies union concession DETROIT United Auto Workers Union Tuesday noped a new economic offer it made to Chrysler Corp re ported to contain some major concessions would lead to a complete new contract agree ment for the firms 60000 work ers It was believed the conces sions could cost workers five cents an hour over three years UAW president Walter P Reuther who made the offer said it took into account Chrys ers 20milliondollar lossthis year and should provide the groundwork for a new three year contract EINAUDI DIES ROME Einaudi 87 he Italian Republics first pres dent died Monday He had been suffering from a heart and circulatory ailment Einaudi served as president from 1948 to 1955 when he was succeeded by Giovanni Gronchi Photofax HELLO wasnt the voice by on the University of Maine campus from the hollow tree that startled The student was ambushed by a stu Virginia Dyer but the hand that grab dent who found the hollow tree made bed her tresses as the senior strolled to order for his Halloweenprank A time for fun PETER PETER PUMPKIN EAT Strieker 8 1424 Hamp shire NE and his sister Kathy 6 have a good time playing the old nursery rhyme game as part of their Halloween fun The big pumpkin was GlobeGazette photo by Musscr formed out of papermache as was the head on the bears costume worn by Terry It took them two days to make them Oh yes their mother helped a little bit OUR WIRE SERVICES LONDON Russia is build ng up a major diplomatic of ensive against the Scandinavian nations NATOs exposed north ern flank diplomatic sources warned here Tuesday This was an interpretation of Moscows surprise approach to ridland for emergency negotia under the 1948 RussoFin nish mutual assistance pact Immediate Russian aims were not spelled out but there was Scandinavians feel pressures wide speculation the Soviets may want a base or bases or other military facilities on Finnish territory Above all Russia was believed anxious to force Finland into strict isolation from the West with which the Helsinki govern ment developed increasingly friendly ties recently The Soviet move rather strangely came while Finlands president and foreign minister were visiting the United States Adlai should have been fired says Van Fleet TAMPA Fla Tampa Tribune quotes Gen James A Van Fleet as saying Adlai E Stevenson ambassador to the United Nations should have been fired because of the Cuban inva sion which fizzled Van Fleet said also that Berlin and Laos are lost and that there is only a 5050 chance of Keeping South Viet Nam out of Commu nist control the Tribune said in todays editions Van Fleet former commander of the 8th Army in Korea was to report to Ft Bragg NC to day He was called out of retire ment to supervise the training of Army units in guerrilla warfare He was quoted as saying Berlin was lost when they made the agreement at the end of World War II The Tribune account added He said Viet Nam has a strong national pride but a white face has no place in that country Van Fleet said Stevenson should have been fired when he said he would not support the armed action bythis country against Fidel Castro duringthe illfated Cuban invasion The general said this country sponsored the invasion and gave full Navy escort and air cover o and from training bases that he United States established Aft r Stevenson took his stand Van Fleet said the United States re fused to go through with plans to give direct support to the landing Eorce Every household to get booklet on shelters WASHINGTON Pen tagon hopes to begin mailing to every household in November a 106page booklet of advice and in struction on family fallout pro tection The booklet will suggest meth ods of improvising home shelters or or less and offer sugj gestions for apartment house PARTLY CLOUDY North Iowa Partly cloudy through Wednesday Lows Tuesday night 3542 Warmer Wednesday highs around 60 Iowa Fair northwest partly cloudy south and east through Wednesday Lows Tuesday Whatever the Soviets have in mind diplomatic observers be lieve Moscows move had as one objective a tighter Russian grip on Finland But the wider Soviet concern is all of Scandinavias impact on the Russian defensive position in the Baltic The Kremlin showed this In these first shots Sweden is attacked for failing to live up to her role as a neu tral in the area Norway and Denmark mem bers of NATO have come under heavy fire for their alleged co j operation with German milita rists Norways Foreign Minister Hal vard Lange has been invited to Moscow for talks next month A policy of intimidation ap pears part of the new Soviet dip lomatic offensive which coincides with a reported steady Russian military buildup in the Baltic RussoFinnish relations have oa the whole been friendly and earlier this year Russia gave Hel sinki the goahead to align itself with the Britishled sevennation European free trade area asso ciation The cabinets of the Scandina vian countries were summoned to meet in their respective capitals o consider the startling request Pending the outcome of the cabi net meetings the Scandinavian iress speculated freely the So viet demand might be aimed at procuring bases night 30s northwest to near 50 southeast Warmer north Wed nesday highs 50s southeast to 60s northwest Further out look partly cloudy little temperature change Thurs day Minnesota Mostly fair cool Highs Wednesday in 50s GlobeGazette weather data upk to 8saJni Tuesday Maximum Two sentences for hijacker EL PASO Tex Leon Bearden 38 was sentenced to life plus 25 years in federal prison for hijacking a Conti 3 Minimum At 8 am Sunrise Sunset YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 55 37 42 48 39 SAME mum punishment for violating three federal laws in the hijack ing His son Cody 16 who pleaded guilty to similar charges was sentenced to an undesignated federal institution until he is 21 A federal court jury found the elder Bearden guilty Oct 18 of kidnaping interstate transpor tation of a stolen airplane and obstruction of interstate com merce BRUSH FIRE SIERRA MADRE Calif More than 500 firefighters bat tled Tuesday to save 25 to 50 homes in Pasadena Glen Can yon near Sierra Madre from t roaring brush fire Swedish jets on patrol in area of new Congo unrest LEOPOLDVILLE the Congo jshelters and cooperative The UN command said hood projects a spokesman said Tuesday five Swedish jets are pa A spokesman for the Office of trolling the Katanga frontier to Civil Defense said Tuesday Katanga planes from at of the 60 million illustrated booktacking forces of the central Con N ews m a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES Britain calls reserves LONDON Queen Elizabeth announced Britain would beef up its armed forces by calling up some reservists and keeping some regular troops in uni form an extra six months In her traditional speech at the reopening of parliament after the summer recess the Queen pledged the government to continue full cooperation with Britains allies to keep NATO strong Fatal train accident PINE BLUFF Ark A Missouri Pacific freight train smashed into the rear of a passenger train in foggy predawn darkness killing the en gineer of the freight and injuring at least 11 Deer me CARMI 111 Richard Matheney was driving along Illinois 460 when he swerved off the road to avoid hitting a deer The car was badly damaged and Matheney obtained anotherauto to continue his business He headed down the same highway a short time later and ran off the roadand into a fence to avoid hitting another deer More Atest protests LONDON Angry demonstrations against the Soviet Unions monster nuclear bomb erupted in Italy Britain and Japan On the inside Editorials Page 4 Society News 101112 Spprts 1314 North Iowa News 15 Latest Markets 16 Mason City News 1617 Clear Lake News 18 Comics 20 Farm Features 21 Transit schedule 22 ONLY THE NEWSPAPER has the variety to make read ing a pleasure for everyone Stories about the curious the strange the lighten the news of interna tional crises BROADCASTER QUITS NEW YORK Colum bia Broadcasting System has announced that veteran news analyst Howard K Smith is leaving the network because of a difference in interpretation of CBS news policy lets probably wont be delivered until December or January how ever because of the massive printing and distribution job CHIANG IS 74 TAIPEI Formosa alist China put out its flags Tuesday for President Chiang Kaisheks 74th birthday go government The announcement did not make clear however whether UN forces would take any ac tion against central government troops which the Katanga govern ments claims have invaded the secessionist province arid are raz ing villages and murdering wom en and children Premier Cyrille Adoula an nounced a virtual declaration of war against Katanga Monday The premier said the Leopoldville government had launched a po lice action to liquidate Katan gas secession U N headquarters here im mediately cabled all available information to the secretariat in New York and said New York headquarters had been asked to rule whether the bombings were to be considered a breach of the KatangaU N ceasefire But some Russ have mixed emotions To the dump with Stalins body MOSCOW of Russians milled about in Red SquareMonday night and openly talked about the eyic tion of Josef Stalins body from the giant tomb it shared with the remains of Lenin For Moscow it was a depar ture from the long silent lines of peoplewho over the years had filed through the mauso leum to gaze in awe at the former dictators enshrined re mains Foreigners who have spent many years in Moscow could remember nothing quite like the open discussions which re placed decades of whispering Most Russians overheard in theSquare favored Stalins de motion to nothingness by the 22nd Soviet Communist party congress But whatever view they held they expressed it without flinching from the dozen plainclothes police and civilian police with red arm bands circulating among the crowds The groups talked of the years when Stalin gripped the Soviet Union with a rule of terror But he won the war said one ruddyfaced middleaged man in Stalins defense No cried another he should have concentrated troops on the Western front A teenager pressed forward from the rear to hear better Everything was bad under Slalin argued a youth in the center of another group An older man in a blue cap and coat replied You are too young to judge him If you lay his good side next to the bad the good outweighs the bad A whitehaired lady in a green felt hat and black coat lectured to three boys towering above her He was true to Marx ismLeninism she declared They laughed She turned on her heel and strodeaway furi ously Other young groups were almost boisterous with their ex uberance To the garbage dump with him said one youth Theyll build a monument to him in Peiping said another They laughed and pushed each other Older people talked as though to disgorge memories of the past Everybodys known for years what happened a mid dleaged man explained but you never dared speak against Stalin or you might be arrested Now you can talk And talk they joy fully some sadly some with puzzlement in their voices One welldressed man in his early 30s pointed out that nearly every family lost some body in the purges and the bad days But a portly w o m n in a group of housewives looking at soldiers guarding the closed tomb said quietly He was everything to us for many years 1 dont know what think   

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