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Mason City Globe Gazette: Saturday, October 28, 1961 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 28, 1961, Mason City, Iowa                             Worth Iowa Daily Newspaper torttw HWM CITY GLOBEGAZETTE VOL IN The newspaper that makes all North lowans mat tad OWtid fttu tounwtiontj Mil LUM MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY OCTOBER 28 1961 neighbors 7o t Paper Consists Of Two If Gripes by ore few Callup taken in stride By JANE SCAVENGER New York Herald Tribune News Service WASHINGTONThe Penta gon is watching its mail bag very closely these days The question What does the public think of highly tentative plans to extend the activeduty tours of mobilized reservists beyond one year if world crises re quire it Officials were delighted with what they call the low gripe level of mail which commented on the mobilization itself Re servists dropped their civilian pursuits sometimes at a genu ine sacrifice and rallied to the colors with becoming patriotic fervor But would they be equal ly so if asked to continue in khaki for more than a year There strong suspicion that Adm George Anderson new Chief of Naval Operations may be the White Houses chosen instrument to end once and for all Americas inter service rivalry The admira talks publicly as well as pri vately like a member of the Pentagon thanas the Navys top uniformed hand steeped in the traditional my Navy right or wrong but my Navy The big tipoff would be His selection as the nexi chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Administration officials fear that President Kennedys tax incentive program recommend ed last spring has temporarily slpwed business purchases o new machinery instead of speed ingthem up Some companies are eager to get the 8 per cent tax credil that the plan now provides and are postponing major equip ment expenditures Thetax pro posal will strengthen business activity in 1962 but its taking some of the steam out of this year The Presidents Council of Economic Advisers is unhappy about the reception that indus try has given its model of the 1963 U S economy The C E A suggested that national out put could hit a record bil lion in 1963 and yield a thump ing billion of corporate profits The White House ex perts thought the estimates would give industry a useful starting point for making ap praisals of production and in vestment programs But some industry critics charge that the C E A is making gestures to ward a planned economy Here is the real reason be hind Gen Maxwell D Taylors mission to Viet Nam Presiden Kennedy has been receiving conflicting reports from the field on the extent of the Red rebe danger to that Southeast Asian country Some administration advisers have warned the Pres ident that South Viet Nam is at the brink of disaster Others say the danger is not that im mediate Kennedy decided to send Gen Taylor his personal military representative for an on the spot investigation Arthur Goldberg secretary of labor is an active member of the Presidents psychological warfare committee Goldberg and the other committeemen have concluded that a main reason Soviet Russia gets away without arousing world opinion against nuclear tests is that Washington has never seriously tried to persuade special groups in foreign countries to take ac tion So far as trade unions are concerned Goldberg has prom ised to change all this His first soundings with leaders in the International Trade Union field have led to results within three months Demonstrations speeches symbolic strikes by labor unions in Africa Europe Asia etc against such things as Sovietcreated fallout CHURCHMAN DIES BOONE tfi Charles A John son 95 the last survivor of the group that attended the found ing of the Evangelical Free Church of America 77 years ago died Friday j AP Phdtofax US AND SOVIET ARMOR FACE TO F Army tanks foreground and Soviet Army tanks face each other at Friedrichstrasse checkpoint m Berlin They faced each other at a 200 yard range for more than 16 hours before withdrawing from the border front line USRussia pu back tank forces Aimsto avoid new incidents WASHINGTON ffl The United States apparently has decided to avoid if possible futrher armed incursions into East Berlin and o concentrate instead on seeking a diplomatic solution of the war thefatening Berlin border dispute Officials here declined to say flatly that there would be no more trips of US civilians into East Berlin with armed escorts They indicated they could not foresee immediately what steps might be necessary in the fastmoving and highly dangerous situation But one high government au thority declared Friday night that the focus of this situation now moves from Berlin to an inter governmental level where it is under urgent and serious discus sion If this report means what it seems to mean it indicates the United States Britain and France now prefer not to carry the bor der quarrel into further risks of a shooting conflict between U S and Soviet tank forces U S and Soviet tanks were drawn up on opposite sides of the border at the Friederichstrasse crossing point Friday Barely 200 yards apart they aimed their guns at each other The effort to get a solution oi the dispute through diplomatic FATAL INJURIES FORT MADISON UP Fred erick C Leafgreen 24 Fort Madison was fatally injured Saturday in a twocar crash on Highway 2 just west of here MacNlders donate 20acre site for retirement home channels began Friday when US Ambassadpr Llewellyn E Thomp son conferred in Moscow with So viet Foreign Minister Andrei A The United States which does not recognize the East German regime resisted any interfer ence with American civilian of ficials entering or leaving East Berlin To demonstrate its right not to submit to East German po lice checks the U S Army staged brief armed forays into Communist territory four times this week Thats when Soviet armored units appeared in the heart of Berlin for the first time since Soviet tanks helped crush the 1953 antiCommunist uprising there To avoid unscheduled inci dents in the explosive situation the U S authorities asked Americans to stay out of East Berlin for the present The Communists still allow American and other Allied sol diers in uniform to cross un hindered U S authorities said the Rus sians by sending tanks had un masked their pretense that the East Germans alone are run ning the show in East Berlin Gromyko Thompson made a bic for Soviet action to end East Ger man insistence on examination o the identification documents o U S officials crossing from Wesl to East Berlin Gromyko is un derstood to have rebuffed the The State Department said Fri day night the ThpmpsonGromy o meeting was unsatisfactory rom the U S point of view But t referred to the meetings as initial talks leaving no doubt that Secretary of State Dean Rusk and presumably President Ken nedy intend to have further ef orts made Trustees of the planned Meth odistsponsored retirement home lere have accepted an offer by Gen and Mrs Hanford MacNi der to give a 20acre building site for the project The land valued at is on the west side of Carolina just be if extended It is a short dis tance beyond the present south end of Carolina The land was offered by the MacNiders in a conversation with Dr George Truman Carl First Methodist Church pastor south of where 23rd SE wouldlast Labor Day The offer now has been accepted unanimously by the homes board It has long been a dream o Mrs MacNider that such a home be erected Methodist of ficials were told and that dream was shared by the gen eral Dr 0 W Brand executive Police chief 5 others indicted LEXINGTON Ky AP The Newport Ky police chief stood accused Saturday of framing George Ratterman a man run ning for sheriff on a pledge to clean up the county surrounding that northern Kentucky gamblers haven The foul odors of vice corrup tion and bribery cover Campbel County like a pall a federa grand jury reported Friday as il returned indictments against New port police chief Upshere White two of his detectives and three other men The indictments charge the de fendants conspired to arrest Rat terman in a hotel room with a strip tease dancer last May 9 al hough they knew Ratterman was innocent11 of any law viola tion MUMS THE WORD MOSCOW the So viet press nor radio has men tioned the launching Friday of Americas giant Saturn rocket SAME N ews m a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES No more bomber money WASHINGTON The Kennedy administration announced that the military buildup will give the na tion a nuclear capability several times that of the Soviet Unions and thus the Pentagon will not spend million ticketed by Congress for big bombers Attack by Cambodia SAIGON South Viet Nam South Viet Nams government announced its southern province has been under attack by Cambodians There was no in dication whether the attack had come from the out side or was a local revolt by Cambodian residents UN appeal to Riiss UNITED NATIONS The UN General As sembly confronted the Soviet Union with a solemn appeal to call off its 50megaton test set for the months end The international body approved the resolution by a smashing vote of 8711 with 1 ab stention but the Russians indicated before the ballot they would turn down the appeal Shell stayin Corps WASHINGTON A young woman Whose post card touched off a furor about the Peace Corps in Nigeria will stay with the Washington The announcement that Margery Michelmore 23 would be assigned here came shortly after it was disclosed that President Kennedy had written her a brief letter of encouragement Chrysler gets deadline DETROIT Chrysler Corp had what amount ed to a Thursday strike deadline from the United Auto Workers Union director of the new home said the offer qf a particular build ing site makes possible the planning of home construction on amore firm basis than be fore Dr Brand former pastor of the Forest City Methodist Church is now living at 611 Grant SW and devoting full time to development of the home plans The first unit of the home is to provide for 100 to 150 residents An infirmary and other facilities are to be added later The present hope is that con struction will begin next year The land donation offer when legal arrangements are com pleted will represent the third large contribution toward the re tirement home project The firsl was a gift from an anonymous Mason City couple and the second was an do nation by the Mason City Develop ment Corp The development group stated that the project will careate new jobs in Mason City both during construction and af ter the home is in operation The planned home will be simi lar in many ways to the Meth odistoperated Firendship Haven retirement home at Fort Dodge Home residency is not restricted to Methodists Former Goy Robert D Blue Sagle Grove is president of the oard of trustees for the new lome and also heads the Friend ship Haven trustees Charles E Cornwell a Mason City attorney s vice president and has been handling the legal details in ac cepting the land offered by the rfacNiders Jack MacNider a son of Gen and Mrs MacNider is one of the trustees The new retirement home is ex pected to cost one to two million lollars In addition to major gifts it is expected that room endowments and smaller gifts will financethe project Maximum Minimum At 8 am Precipitation Sunrise Sunset YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum On the inside Editorials Page 4 Clear Lake News5 Church Features 67 Mason City News 89 Latest Markets 9 Society News 10 Sports1112 The Surveyor15 Comics16 Business News1718 Transit Schedule 18 North Iowa News 20 SHOWERS Iowa Mostly cloudy with oc casional showers or thunder storms Saturday night and Sun day Not much change in tem peratures Lows Saturday night in the 40s Highs Sunday in 60s Globe Gazette weather data up to 8 am Saturday 63 140 51 trace 59 38 Fallout on quick trip across U S WASHINGTON m high flying fallout cloud from Rus sias big nuclear explosion passed over the northwestern United States during the nighi and was headed across the northern states toward the Great Lakes and southeastern Canada The Weather Bureau mad this estimate Saturday and re peated there is no alarm Fallout expert List said he would expect the same general1 levels of radio activity as were observed with some of the earlier Soviet bomb clouds We would be surprised he said if we get any more de jris from this than any other Russian explosion List said the invisible concen xation of radioactive ash from Mondays big detonation passed over Washington Oregon and Northern California He esti mated it was being carried by about 80mileanhour winds and that it was possibly a couple of hundred miles wide 22 FLEE BERLIN BERLIN W During the night 22 East Germans escaped o freedom through the concrete and wire barriers encircling West Berlin police reported Three of them including two girls swam across canals r rivers HURRY BACK had her little lamb and Brad Curry 11 has his little fawn but he cant take it to school so every morning the fawn sees him to the school bus from hisfront steps near Galesburg Mich Then the fawn goes roaming in the woods to return at night The Currys found it in the yard when it was few days old and it has stayed for five months v Berlin tension eased Plane sent over scene BERLIN AP Soviet and American tanks withdrew quietly and without fanfare Saturday from the Berlin border front line easing tension at the EastWest checkpoint where they had re mained facetoface at gunpoint range for more than 16 hours The 10 Russian tanks pulled back to their East Berlin quarters about a mile away first Then about 75 minutes later the four American tanks withdrew Defying Soviet protests against flights over East Ber lin a US Air Force plane cir cled for 10 minutes over the area where Soviet tanks were parked The Soviets had pro tested against flights over East Berlinby US helicopters US authorities said the Western al lies have the right to fly over all Berlin under postwar four power agreements As soon as the Soviet tanks left the border area East Ger man police relaxed their stiff controls at the border and waved traffic through with a smile on the Friedrichstrasse crossing point after the huge armored vehicles rumbled away in opposite direc tions The critical Berlin dispute over Allied rights of entry into East Berlin was by no means settled But it obviously meant that the road to possible negotiations would be easier with American and Russian tank guns no longer trained on each other But the abrupt aboutturn from the front answered the hottest question in this tense divided city Would the Soviet Union or the US tanks be the first to back away from the explosive border Only a painted white line a twofoot high barrier and 200 yards of asphalt had separated he 10 Soviet and 4 American tanks which zeroed in on each other at pointblank range at am the Soviet crewmen calmly mounted their anks some decorated with flow ers closed down the hatches then urned around and rumbled out of he Friedrichstrasse checkpoint area and into a side street leading owards the ruins of the palace if Kaiser Wilhelm II There were tense moments until t became known in which direc ion the Soviets were going to move The American crewmen jumped nto their tanks and waited gun ning thenmotors But when it be came apparent that the Red tanks wre moving back instead of for vard a US captain signaled for he engines to be switched off A large US Army sedan carry ng five uniformed Americans gassed through the checkpoint into Berlin soon after the Soviet anks had departed US Army cars had been travel ing back and forth from the Com munist sector all night But it marked the first time during that eriod in which they were spared he trouble of detouring around he Red armored vehicles The Soviet tank departure was nreceded by a visit by a group if East German army officers to he border The group included a ull colonel three lieutenant colo nels and several other officers who looked around and apparently were briefed by East German police The movement came after a ear gas battle had flared up dur ng the night between East and West German police LONDON spokes man for the Brazilian embassy icre said Saturday that former president Janlo Quadros wai en route to Australia by ship   

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