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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 9, 1961 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 9, 1961, Mason City, Iowa                             North Iowas Daily Newspaper Idittd for Hw CITY GLOBEGAZETTE VOL 99 The newspaper that makes all North lowans neighbors Associated Prcu tad United Frew faterwfloBM Fun Wim MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY OCTOBER 9 1961 7o Two SectionsSection On 311 One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL GlobeGazette Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KGLO U30U pm Sun KWLC Decorata 1240 pm Sun WOJ Ames 640 Tuet WTAD Quincy 930 pm Thurs WSUI CKy 910t SSO am The Kremlin would love to trade worries s TN our everpresent concern 1 about Berlin Cuba the Com munists and nuclear fallout we are prone to forget that Russia is beset by practically all of the worries known to us plus a lol more wholly unknown to us one which conies to mind first in this connection is food Our problem of course results from our overproductive econ omy We have wheat corn and a lot of other virtually running out of our ears In the Communist w o x 1 d including Russia itself food is in short supply The range is from Red China which is at this very moment experiencing one of historys worst famines to the USSR where the excess of starchy foods such as black bread pro duces a nation of overweight but undernourished people In its way the Russian daytbday menu is as drab and monotonous as that of the riceeating nation of southeastern Asia In a commentary about my ex periences and observations in Russia it was actually written in Finland where I knewmy writings would not be I noted this v During my stay in Russias three largest Len ingrad and didnt see one woman on the street whose looks would not have been im proved by a weightreducing diet discipline In a subsequent paragraph I mentioned one exception to this rule Feminine members of the famous Russian ballet were trim of figure at least on a com parative basis Whether this was the result of their vigorous exer cise or a special diet I never learned Probably it was a little of both On a collective farm out of Moscow I saw 300 workers busy ing themselves at a task which could have been better done by onefifth as many American farm people In Yugoslavia under Titos brand of I saw short rations in the midst of farm land reminiscent of my own Iowa Alongside Moscows magnifi cent subway system and lofty university I saw Russian peo ple living in what would be clas sifiable as slums in America or Western Europe The Russian people can neither live in nor eat their subways or their sput niks A trip to Vienna would be ever so much more inviting to them than that much talked about trip to the moon TWAS A BEAUTIFUL IOWA Crowds Sunday filled Ledges State Park 3 miles south of Boone as rich autumnal color spotted the rocky bluffs of the Des Moines River scenic spot Many waded in the springfed stream Photofax barefooted picnic tables were scarce the newly opened Wildlife Exhibit in the south part of the park drew an esti mated 20000 and cars were bumperto bumper through the park Russ ambassador punched in scrap over defectors wife FROM OCR WIRE SERVICE AMSTERDAM Soviet em bassy officials and Dutch po lice clashed here Monday in an airport fist fight over cus tody of the wife of a Soviet defector and the Soviet am bassador was punched in the nose Russian Ambassador P K Ponomarenko took the blow from a Dutch policeman when he and nine other fistswinging Soviet officials stormed a po lice office at Schiphol airport to regain custody of Mrs Alexei Golub wife of a Soviet engineer who defected to the West The Russian officials dragged the woman from the airport police office and took her to the office of the Soviet Aeroflot airline where she was held under heavy guard The infuriated Soviet ambas sador declared there would be farreaching conseque es if Dutch police failed to return the passport of Mrs Golub so she could return to Moscow The Dutch police had stopped Mrs Golub just as she was preparing to board an airliner with a party of Soviet tourists returning to Moscow They took her passport and asked her whether she was returning home of her own free will Mrs Golubs 35yearold hus band defected from the same Soviet tourist group Sunday and asked the Dutch for political asylum After she was dragged into the Soviet airline office Mrs Golub burst into tears and said I wish to return to my country My husband did not know what he was doing she said sobbing while Soviet officials around her nodded He did wrong I have written a letter to the Dutch minister of for eign affairs because I love my husband An experimental drug being given to Mr Sam DALLAS Tex AP Speaker Fiveday isam Rayburn a relentless fight A second thing that would injections that may help ry me deeply if I held a position Mm jn h5is battle with cancer of authority or responsibility in the Kremlin is that communism and Communists are detested the world around feared in er for all his 79 years has begun receiving injections that may him in his battle with cancer Rayburn is taking an experi mental drug called 5 Fluoroura cil If he responds well he will many places and perhaps even respected by those who respect a bully but universally hated No where is this more mani fest than in the satellite coun tries It came to the surface in a big way eight years ago when the people of East Germany rose up in a shortlived protest They discovered however that bare hands are a poor weapon against tanks and machine guns But the hatred that Germans bear for their Russian masters is a little more deepseated than their dislike of communism It stems from an ancient enmity between German and Russian There would be hatred even if there was no such thing as Marx ism involved And the same can be said of the Poles who have been restive under the Kremlins yoke A more representative mani festation of hatred occurred in Hungary five years ago Work ers who had been subjected to the Marxist discipline for sev eral years and youngsters who had never experienced even a whiff of pure air within their entire memory span joined in manning the barricades on Bud apests streets get daily injections for around two weeks Dr Ralph Tompsett chief of in ternal medicine at Baylor Uni versity Medical Center said the first treatment was given Rayburn Sunday It will be several days he said before it is known wheth er the drug produces undesirable side effects Iowa Temperatures 3 more air units called WASHINGTON Labor leaders face major issue Teamsters back in AFLCIO NEW YORK AP Organized labor leaders open a weeklong meeting today to decide whether to take back James R Hoffas expelled Teamsters Union or start a rival truck drivers unit It appeared likely that the AFL CIO would continue its fouryear exile of Hoffas organization on corruption charges A number of AFLCIO unions have been actively urging read mission of the Teamsters They point out that despite court convic tions of several Hoffa aides lie himself has emerged unscathed from a barrage of charges Joseph A Curran president of the National Maritime Union and a federation vice president and Michael J Quill head of the Transport Workers Union are leaders of the proHoffa group Still other AFLCIO unions are equally insistent that not should the doors be kept shut against Hoffa but a rival union should be established to try to woo Teamsters members away from him Among those seeking formation of a new AFLCIO Teamsters or ganization are Presidents James B Carey of the International Un ion of Electrical Workers and Joseph A Beirne of the Com munications Workers The Teamsters were ousted in 1957 after extensive corruption disclosures by the Senate rackets investigating committee headed by Sen John L McClellan D Ark Since then the Teamsters and the federation have gone their separate ways in a sort of armed truce Considerable cooperation continues however between AFL CIO unions and the Teamsters on state and local levels George Meany AFLCIO presi dent recently has been extend ing active encouragement to a few scattered Teamsters locals that bolted from Hoffas union Prison break veday Iowa Temperaluresm6re Air National Guard ignt during the next five days Tuesdav through Saturdayer squadrons and their support will average 2 to 5 degrees umts are belnS ordeml to low normal with main cooling occurring Thursday or Friday Normal highs will be in the low 60s Normal lows will be near 40degrees Rainfall will average 10 to 20 of an inch with occasional rain Monday night and again Thursday or Friday North Iowa Rain and cooler Monday night lows 4548 Lo cally heavy rain likely Tues day highs 5058 active duty Nov 1 in Americas military buildup to meet the Berlin crisis the Defense De partment announced Monday The new edict involving 65 jet planes and 2250 men brought to 21 squadrons and 500 jets the total additional combat strength added to the regular air force since the start of the buildup in August The new squadrons called up were the 197th fighter intercept jor squadron Phoenix Ariz the QG CIIcULb i The drug is not a cure but Rain Monday night cooler157111 fighter interceptor squad uu northeasti lows Iiear 40 north ron Eastpver SC and the 101st may halt the spread of cancer Rayburn appears to be doing about as well as can be expected Each medical bulletin has said rested fairly comfortably or ate reasonably well BUTLER DID IT LOS ANGELES UPI Wil liam Paul 46 the Britishborn butler of Mary Pickford and bandleader Buddy Rogers was arrested Sunday on charges he stole a ring given Miss Pickford by her late husband Douglas Fairbanks Sr On the inside Editorials News Quii Society News Comics 10 Sports After the battle had beenj North won the Kremlin in Litt Markets violation of a pledge sent in Turn to 2 Please west to 5560 southeast Locally heavy rain likely Tuesday cooler southeast highs 40s northwest to near 60 south east Further outlook Cloudy with chance of rain Wednesday Partly cloudy warmer Highs Tuesday in 60s GlobeGazette weather data up to 8 am Monday Maximum 77 Minimum 50 At 8 am 50 Sunrise Sunset YEARAGO Maximum 72 Minimum 37 ATEST WASHINGTON UPI The Soviet Union Sunday set off the Masori falloutproducing atomic Clear Lake News iblast in the scries of weapons Transit ScheduleW jlesls started Sept 1 fighter interceptor squadron Knoxville Tenn All three are equipped with needlenosed F104 Slaughters capable of flying more than 1 400vmiles an hour A total of 155250 reservists and National Guardsmen have now been ordered to active duly in the event of a military show down over Berlin Another 75 000 are a special alert category With aid from a steppedup draft nearly 250000 men are to be added to the 2500000man armed forces WATER SPOUT DAMAGE OCEANSIDE Calif UPI Two towering water spouts of hurricane force ripped into San Diego Countys resort coast Sunday injuring three persons Guards were overpowered DES MOINES AP Six in mates of the criminally insane ward at the Anamosa Mens Re formatory attempted to break out early Ben Baer state pe nal director said Monday Baer said the six men bverpow ered two guards and sought to break out of a window in the ward He said the six were the only mental patients in the ward at the time They overwhelmed and tied up guards William Boland and Mar ion Dirks and were using a pipe wrench on one of the windows when their escape was discov ered Baer said that John Folkers a guard who was patroling the out side of the building heard a noise and called in help The break attempt occurred about 2 am All six inmates are now in individual cells of the hos pital unit Baer said He identified the inmates as Willard Otto 34 committed from Polk County in 1957 for a 10year term for breaking and en tering Paul Wilson 19 of Buchanan County committed last August from the Independence State Men al Health Institute after he was involved in a fight Henry Osborn 28 sentenced to a oneyear term at the Peniten iary from Poweshiek Bounty last May for a jail break in Monte1 uma then transferred to the re formatory for psychiatric treat ment Sept 1 Floyd Mortley 23 sentenced to a 10year term at the Penitentiary from Page County for forgery last February then transferred to the reformatory for psychiatric obser vation last August William Thomas 41 sentenced to a 10year term at the penitenj tiary from Winneshiek County inj 1957 for car theft and breaking and entering then transferred to the reformatory later Robert Pennington 32 sen tenced to a 10year term at the penitentiary in i960 from Linn County for forgery then trans ferred to the reformatory last Aug 11 Neither guard was hurt 20 Russian seamen spurn Danish help CHRISTIANSOE Denmark UPI A Soviet tug Monday picked up 20 Russian fishermen who preferred to huddle on a rock in the sea for two nights to being rescued by Danish seamen The Russians had brushed off offers of aid from friendly Danes since their traw ler ran aground on the rocks northeast of thisDanish Baltic island Saturday They waited in the cold without any shelter for the Russian tug slightly and estimated dollars in causing damage the thousand of SAME DATE WO 443 BUek Meant In Faif tt HourK But woman is silenced Boom brinm a roar AUSTIN Tex UPI The Air Force said Monday it has learned a lesson in public relations from Jim Wilson assistant city manager of Austin where Bergstrom Air Force Base is located As happens several times a week a sonic boom from one of the jet planes at the air base had just shaken up a section of the city when Wilsons telephone jangled I want you people to stop that plane that just flew over and broke the sound barrier an irate woman demanded of Wilson He thought for a minute then asked soberly Did you get the license number They both laughed I guess it was silly wasnt it the lady said and hung up take Series 735 CINCINNATI Ohio UPI The thunderous New York Yankees won their 19th World Series in 26 tries Monday by overpowering the Cincinnati Beds 135 for their fourth victory in five games before a stunned Crosley Field crowd of 32589 With Hetor Lopez subbing for the injured Yogi Berra and knocking in five runs the Yankees rolled up five runs in both the first and fourth innings as they blasted a record total of eight Cincinnati pitch ers en route to their seriesclinching victory Johnny Blanchard hit a tworun homer off start er Joey Jay in the first inningand Lopez who had tripled in the first drove in three more with a homer off Bill Henry in the fourth Bill Skowron joined those two in leading the Yankee assult by knocking in three runs on long singles in both the two big in nings All five Cincinnati runs came on homers with Frank Robinson driving in three in the third inning with a blast to right center off Yankee starter Ralph Terry and Wally Post homering off reliever Bud Daley with a man on base in the fifth Daley a lefthander who relieved Terry in the third after Robinsons home run went the rest of the way without serious trouble setting down the des perate Reds on a total of five hits for his five and twothirds innings of pitching He was credited with the victory Yankees 510 502 15 1 Cincinnati 003 020 11 3 Winning pitcher Daley Losing Pitcher Jay N ews in a nutshell FROM OUR WIRE SERVICES decision delayed VIENTIANE Laos Rightwing Laotian lead ers forced a 24hour delay in seeking King Savang Vatthanas approval of a plan to form a coalition gov ernment with Prince Souvanna Phouma Communist backed neutralist as premier Courts verdict stands WASHINGTON The Supreme C9urt refused to review a decision that states having righttowork laws may ban agency shop agreements Such an agreement requires nonunion employes to pay union dues on the theory that the union as bargaining agent for all workers is entitled to financial support from all Drive against housewives MIAMI Fla An antiCastro organization says the Cuban government plans to execute housewives to stop public protest about food shortages The first publicly known execution of a woman since Fidel Cas tro came to power will take place on Tuesday a Cuban holiday Reds stiffen stand WASHINGTON The United States and its al lies faced the problem of deciding on their next move in the Berlirf crisis in view of a stiffened Soviet stand There appeared to be differences among the western powers as to the wisdom of continuing to probe for a soft spot in the Russian demands which call for abandonment of the Allied position in Berlin Kennedy flies to Dallas NEWPORT R I President Kennedy flew to Dallas Tex for a brief visit with ailing House speaker Sam Rayburn A rebuff to prof it sharing AMC local rejects it By BEN PHLEGAR DETROIT future of he auto industrys first workers rofit sharing plan American Motors contract with the United Auto cast in doubt Monday AMCs Local 72 of the UAW at Senosha Wis acting contrary to the four other locals of the com pany rejected the plan formally Sunday night An official spokesman for AMG said the company would make no comment until the UAW makes a statement on the situation The spokesman said that as faras AMC was concerned a contract had been agreedto in negotia tions and ratification was up to the union International officers of tha UAW reportedly were in a hud dle on what step next to take The AMC development came as another nettlesome problem in the monthslong effort to settle on new threeyear contracts in the auto industry Ford Local 600 of the UAW set out picket lines barring office workers from entering the com pany administration building iu he weekold strike against Ford Since last Tuesday Fords 120 000 hourly workers have been on strike over local plant issues Ford and the UAW already had agreed on a threeyear economic jackage But local disputes pre vented a general settlement Ne otiations have been continuing Office workers made no attempt to go through the picket lines In stead they joked with pickets and stood around Pickets barred their cars from company parking lots Only General Motors has finally settled with the this came only after a strike of nearly wo weeks over local issues that died more than 200000 GM vorkers AMC local 72s contract rejec tion reportedly by a sum mar gin came at a sparsely attended mass meeting of the local at Kenosha Wis Only about 3000 of the locals 12000 members cast ballots These reportedly included elimi nation ofa fiveminutes washup period changes in the seniority system and the dropping of one cent an hour in cost of living pay in exchange for a fiveminute washup period at the end of a shift CJAW President Walter P Reutber declined comment pend ing official from Kenosha Reuther said he felt contract ratification would have to be effected by the total vote of the AMC union membership 25000 men The four other AMC locals had voted ratification earlier These included two in Detroit one in Grand Rapids Mich and one in Milwaukee A total vote has not been an r unced However it is known to have been close Under profit sharing the AMC worker gets a 15 per cent cut of the profit after 10 per cent of the firms net worth is deducted for stockholders The worker gets 10 per cent in cash and 5 per cent in stock SNOW IN WEST LANDER Wyo sudden savage storm covered western Wyoming with more than a foot of snow Monday blocking traffic and snarling communications   

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